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Women's leggings

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Flintlock

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We now have loads of information of what men wore while on a expedition, whether military, hunting or just traveling but am now curious as to what the women possibly wore on their legs as protection from the snow and cold. Did they wrap their legs with wool scrap, maybe on occasion used knee high wool leggings like those popular with native women of the time or did they just suffer through with a extra pair of stockings. What do women today use if trekking in 18th century fashion during the cold months.
 

tenngun

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This is western. Dress drawings show legging/high top mocc below hem.
Woman rarely hunted. When on hunting parties or war parties tended to stay in camp, or go to the kill site.
White did paintings of the Indians in the Carolina. They were dressed in skirts of Spanish moss, bare legged and bare foot.
Our distaff documentation is rare until women were buying cloth and white clothing
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I can’t speak specifically to documented garments, but I can say that as far as your legs actually being kept warm, traditional 18th century women’s clothing is warmer than you’d think. I’ve camped out in below freezing and windy conditions wearing 18th century period correct clothing and was able to stay toasty. Three or more wool petticoats will keep any wind or moisture out from your legs down to your ankles. Two sets of wool stockings takes care of the rest. A cloak over the top keeps you dry.

I have seen examples of Georgian era women’s riding boots that come up to the high ankle, so perhaps there was something similar used in snowy conditions as well.
 

Brokennock

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I can’t speak specifically to documented garments, but I can say that as far as your legs actually being kept warm, traditional 18th century women’s clothing is warmer than you’d think. I’ve camped out in below freezing and windy conditions wearing 18th century period correct clothing and was able to stay toasty. Three or more wool petticoats will keep any wind or moisture out from your legs down to your ankles. Two sets of wool stockings takes care of the rest. A cloak over the top keeps you dry.

I have seen examples of Georgian era women’s riding boots that come up to the high ankle, so perhaps there was something similar used in snowy conditions as well.
Thank you
And welcome friend.
 

Artificer

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I can’t speak specifically to documented garments, but I can say that as far as your legs actually being kept warm, traditional 18th century women’s clothing is warmer than you’d think. I’ve camped out in below freezing and windy conditions wearing 18th century period correct clothing and was able to stay toasty. Three or more wool petticoats will keep any wind or moisture out from your legs down to your ankles. Two sets of wool stockings takes care of the rest. A cloak over the top keeps you dry.

I have seen examples of Georgian era women’s riding boots that come up to the high ankle, so perhaps there was something similar used in snowy conditions as well.
Indeed, WELCOME ABOARD!!

Very much looking forward to more of your thoughts and experiences of the feminine side of the hobby!!!

Gus
 

Brokennock

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Thanks so much! I’m not very well versed in a lot of historical survival skills, but the clothing is something I understand!
Truth.
but the clothing is something I understand!
Having seen some of what you have made, or at least pictures thereof,,, I'd say you do. And, you should really share some of it with us along with some how to info.
I know there is a gentleman with a post in the clothing section that could use some help with some pleats.
 
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