William Buchele unsigned rifle?

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Brianc

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Kinda looking at a William Buchele (attributed ) flintlock from the 70s the vendor that has it is asking just shy of 2 grand and while I like the look of it I’m not sure about the fact it’s unsigned. Do any of you all know anything about this builder? Not sure if we’re allowed to link to the people that have it or not . Thank you
 

Captjoel

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My best advice to you would be totally about the gun itself without any regards to an attributed maker. If the piece displays the fineness of a well built custom rifle; fit and finish, well designed and executed carving, inlays, patchbox, engraving, and everything falls into the correct elements of a particular school. Are the parts from top notch makers? Barrel maker identified, swamped, tapered, or straight? All in good condition especially the bore?

If all of these things listed come up positive and the piece fits you then you can search within yourself if the asking price is acceptable and you have the means and desire to purchase.

I base my advice from experience with other unsigned rifles that have been attributed to well known builders. A signed rifle by Buchele can go for a premium just because it is signed. No signature, it takes a lot of salesmanship and often most is just a repeat of previous owners ideas without any true provenance of truth. (BS)

Good luck
 

dave_person

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Hi,
Buchele was a well known maker during the 1950s through the early 1970s. He died in 1977. Most consider his guns representative of the long rifle revival period and he was known for his extensive carving and inlays. Many of the parts he used were hand made or by commercial makers that no longer exist because few of the commercially made parts of which we are familiar were around when he worked. Many of his guns were modern fantasy pieces that do not copy any originals. That said, he was a skilled carver and very creative. He also was the original author of the book "Recreating the American Longrifle". I've not seen an unsigned Buchele rifle.

dave

Here are some photos of a Buchele for comparison:







 

Brianc

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Hi,
Buchele was a well known maker during the 1950s through the early 1970s. He died in 1977. Most consider his guns representative of the long rifle revival period and he was known for his extensive carving and inlays. Many of the parts he used were hand made or by commercial makers that no longer exist because few of the commercially made parts of which we are familiar were around when he worked. Many of his guns were modern fantasy pieces that do not copy any originals. That said, he was a skilled carver and very creative. He also was the original author of the book "Recreating the American Longrifle". I've not seen an unsigned Buchele rifle.

dave

Here are some photos of a Buchele for comparison:







Thank you all for the help I passed because I’m absolutely not sure and unsigned is unsure in my opinion
 

EC121

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Ask the vendor if he/she can come with the provenance for the rifle to prove who the builder was. If he can't, then the rifle stands on its own with no premium paid for the name on the barrel. Buchele had his name on the lock. Looked stamped, not engraved, to me.
 

EC121

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The name on the lock always looks the same. He must have ordered several of those locks and had them stamped with his name.
 

Notchy Bob

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I discovered Muzzle Blasts when I was about nine years old, and became an avid reader. Some time in the sixties, Mr. Buchele wrote a serialized group of articles for that magazine on building a longrifle. He was one of relatively few masters of the craft at that time, and he was a good writer, too. I remember reading his articles. Precision kits with pre-carved stocks didn't exist then, to my knowledge. Mr. Buchele told people how to make a stock from a plank, and how to fit all the other parts so they would work together properly. He was very highly respected.

You'll be lucky today to find an entry-level longrifle from a custom builder for $2,000. Add carving, a patchbox, and some inlays, and the price will spiral skyward. Worth every penny, too. The point being that I agree with @Captjoel in his assessment. If you need a longrifle, consider that one on its own merits, regardless of who built it. I would not buy it strictly as a collectible Buchele, if it isn't marked or signed as such.

I would also agree with @dave_person in that many of Mr. Buchele's rifles were not built as copies of specific early guns in adherence to any traditional "school" of gunsmithing. Mr. Buchele sort of founded his own school. The carving on the rifle in Dave's post exemplifies this. The relief carving of the two native men, aft of the cheek piece on that rifle, is extraordinary.

Notchy Bob
 

Spence10

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The name on the lock always looks the same. He must have ordered several of those locks and had them stamped with his name.
I've been told that Buchele made locks, himself. Does anyone have definitive information about that?

Spence
 
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