Whiskey Flask Liner

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SAOutdoorsman

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How was moonshine handled then. In frontier America many distilled at home, but it was primarily done by a local maker who served a community
It was a never ending competition between he who brewed and he who taxed
Hi tenngun,

When I speak to farmers here, many recount stories of their fathers or grandfathers running home-stills. Indeed some were noted for their particular moonshine that they made and probably went on to supply their communities, but I think most would have just catered for home-use, if I judge by the number of people who recall their parents' brewing activities.

Kind regards,
SAO
 
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but I damn-well wanted a whiskey horn and I made one and I will see it functional.
And THAT my friends pretty much sum's up the topic.
So it's not really an issue of function or history, it's a matter of seeking personal validation at this point
Not concerned about history or experience,, just wanting to be told it's Ok.
:dunno:
So it's Ok I already told ya,, if you want a horn to store whiskey,, that is any way palatable in a 2022 manner then,
Your going to have to use a modern lining. If you don't then expect your whiskey to have a horn taint.
It's not complicated at all.
 

SAOutdoorsman

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And THAT my friends pretty much sum's up the topic.
So it's not really an issue of function or history, it's a matter of seeking personal validation at this point
Not concerned about history or experience,, just wanting to be told it's Ok.
:dunno:
So it's Ok I already told ya,, if you want a horn to store whiskey,, that is any way palatable in a 2022 manner then,
Your going to have to use a modern lining. If you don't then expect your whiskey to have a horn taint.
It's not complicated at all.
Ok, let me say this simply so you will understand:

If I didn't care about doing this as historically accurate as possible, then I wouldn't be here. I would have just used a food-grade epoxy and the job would be done.
Hence, I posted a thread asking people for advice on how to line my whiskey horn concerning the materials I mentioned and which would be most safe and effective.

However, you've done nothing but argue that horn flasks never existed in the sense of prolonged alcohol storage. I'm not here to argue that or else this would have been posted elsewhere on the forum. I already know horn flasks to be a fact of history as they were used in parts of Africa (by my forefathers the Boers for one) and I know in Scotland. So whether you believe that or not, it's your problem, but please, keep it off of this thread because I've asked about something entirely different.

Lastly, it is ironic that you speak of personal validation because it seems to me that you just want to be right. And, you cannot tell the difference between determination and validation. I am determined to see my project completed because I am trying to keep my own heritage alive. It also presented a challenge to me to make a whiskey horn flask as they did in the old days. And so what if I feel a sense of accomplishment in achieving what I set out to do? Is that not a good thing?

So I implore you to challenge yourself to read a bit more, and to stop looking for online arguments to start and win. Perhaps then, you may also feel accomplished and validated. But remember, you need to be determined.
 

Brokennock

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Ok, let me say this simply so you will understand:

If I didn't care about doing this as historically accurate as possible, then I wouldn't be here. I would have just used a food-grade epoxy and the job would be done.
Hence, I posted a thread asking people for advice on how to line my whiskey horn concerning the materials I mentioned and which would be most safe and effective.

However, you've done nothing but argue that horn flasks never existed in the sense of prolonged alcohol storage. I'm not here to argue that or else this would have been posted elsewhere on the forum. I already know horn flasks to be a fact of history as they were used in parts of Africa (by my forefathers the Boers for one) and I know in Scotland. So whether you believe that or not, it's your problem, but please, keep it off of this thread because I've asked about something entirely different.

Lastly, it is ironic that you speak of personal validation because it seems to me that you just want to be right. And, you cannot tell the difference between determination and validation. I am determined to see my project completed because I am trying to keep my own heritage alive. It also presented a challenge to me to make a whiskey horn flask as they did in the old days. And so what if I feel a sense of accomplishment in achieving what I set out to do? Is that not a good thing?

So I implore you to challenge yourself to read a bit more, and to stop looking for online arguments to start and win. Perhaps then, you may also feel accomplished and validated. But remember, you need to be determined.
I've been meaning to formulate a more in depth topic about what I am going to try to say here. I think what Necchi is saying is relevant to it.
I understand where you are coming from on this. You know these were used historically in you're area of the world. You wish to emulate that in a historicallycorrectway. You want your whisky to taste like it always does.
These last two are the rub that causes the friction.
One of the hardest things for us to do, I think, is, as modern people trying to do things in a historical way, to put our modern expectations aside when it comes to assessing the results of an experimental/experiential archeology project.
We seek subconsciously to use historically correct materials and techniques to get a modern result.
Well, maybe, not getting that result is the correct answer.
Period footwear did not keep your feet dry. Think on the men, and women who's wet feet came before us.
The whiskey from their horns may not have tasted the same as at home. It was part of their life. Think on the circumstances of their lives that lead them to be carrying whiskey afield in a horn. What were they going through that made it okay that the whiskey tasted slightly of horn? That they were grateful just to have that whiskey?

If we seek the experiences of our ancestors we may occasionally just have to except them for what they are. And often what they are may be uncomfortable or less than ideal by our standards.
 

paulab

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Have a look at this wee laddie with his sheep horn flask
My wife was born in Scotland and she assures me that her clan would need a horn that would hold several gallons..................and that would be only a day's ration!
 

SAOutdoorsman

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I've been meaning to formulate a more in depth topic about what I am going to try to say here. I think what Necchi is saying is relevant to it.
I understand where you are coming from on this. You know these were used historically in you're area of the world. You wish to emulate that in a historicallycorrectway. You want your whisky to taste like it always does.
These last two are the rub that causes the friction.
One of the hardest things for us to do, I think, is, as modern people trying to do things in a historical way, to put our modern expectations aside when it comes to assessing the results of an experimental/experiential archeology project.
We seek subconsciously to use historically correct materials and techniques to get a modern result.
Well, maybe, not getting that result is the correct answer.
Period footwear did not keep your feet dry. Think on the men, and women who's wet feet came before us.
The whiskey from their horns may not have tasted the same as at home. It was part of their life. Think on the circumstances of their lives that lead them to be carrying whiskey afield in a horn. What were they going through that made it okay that the whiskey tasted slightly of horn? That they were grateful just to have that whiskey?

If we seek the experiences of our ancestors we may occasionally just have to except them for what they are. And often what they are may be uncomfortable or less than ideal by our standards.
Hi Brokennock,

I agree with what you're saying, it makes sense.
But the taste of the whiskey was not really my concern. In my initial post here, I asked concerning the safety of un-lined horns and the materials aforementioned. If I can get a pure whiskey taste, then all the better - and one gentleman who commented here has found success in preserving taste in his beeswax-lined horns - but, it wasn't my primary concern.

Kind regards,
SAO
 

Brokennock

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Hi Brokennock,

I agree with what you're saying, it makes sense.
But the taste of the whiskey was not really my concern. In my initial post here, I asked concerning the safety of un-lined horns and the materials aforementioned. If I can get a pure whiskey taste, then all the better - and one gentleman who commented here has found success in preserving taste in his beeswax-lined horns - but, it wasn't my primary concern.

Kind regards,
SAO
Unless you used a modern adhesive that is soluble with alcohol, which you didn't, or the wood you used for a cap has toxic oils that are alcohol soluble, I wouldn't worry about it.
But, lining it with beeswax the way one might a gourd canteen couldn't hurt, and may help prevent leaks.
 

Crown_Pointer

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If we seek the experiences of our ancestors we may occasionally just have to except them for what they are. And often what they are may be uncomfortable or less than ideal by our standards.
Having had a lot of experience with alcohol (distillation) I would say you just have to remember (esp if over 35%) it's a solvent. Rumour has it that alcohol will even leach the tanins out of oak ;-) It's something to be cautious of. Lead pipes used to be common and I wouldn't want to be using them. Alcohol can leach many plastics (harming you) while others are fine. My advice would be to use natural materials that would be OK to eat (beeswax, wood etc). Just be cognizant of the potential.

And above all else remember.....always drink in moderation! ;-D

Moderation.JPG
 

PhDBrewer

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SAO, as with wood barrels, one must keep them wet to seal. If the only seal is the interface between the wood and the horn, and it leaks, cut in a grove on the wood and inlay a cork strip. Cork & wood will swell to seal. Clean your horn the best you can. Fill and store with cheap (drinkable) alcohol to keep the seal wet, even when stored.
Drain (keeping "storage" alcohol to refill when storing... ) and fill with quality consumption fluid when required. Most horn flasks I have seen are carried with the seal (wood) end upright as your image depicts. Great looking horn.
Best of all!
PhDBrewer
 

SAOutdoorsman

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SAO, as with wood barrels, one must keep them wet to seal. If the only seal is the interface between the wood and the horn, and it leaks, cut in a grove on the wood and inlay a cork strip. Cork & wood will swell to seal. Clean your horn the best you can. Fill and store with cheap (drinkable) alcohol to keep the seal wet, even when stored.
Drain (keeping "storage" alcohol to refill when storing... ) and fill with quality consumption fluid when required. Most horn flasks I have seen are carried with the seal (wood) end upright as your image depicts. Great looking horn.
Best of all!
PhDBrewer
Hi PhDBrewer,

Thanks for the reply, I appreciate it.

Indeed, a big challenge was making sure the flask is watertight. I will keep in mind to store it with cheaper spirits.

As I was making it though, I was thinking of ways to prevent leaks and what I did essentially was make an "o-ring" from hemp fibers and waxed it with black pitch that I made, and this I put into a groove I gouged on the inside lip of the lid. Secondly, you can see in the picture, I put another hemp ring in the gap between the lid and horn after packing the gap full of that black pitch, and it works very well, only a drop or two came out. But, I think after swelling, it should be 100% watertight.

Thanks again!

Kind regards,
SAO
 

PhDBrewer

Buckskin Baxter
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Hi PhDBrewer,

Thanks for the reply, I appreciate it.

Indeed, a big challenge was making sure the flask is watertight. I will keep in mind to store it with cheaper spirits.

As I was making it though, I was thinking of ways to prevent leaks and what I did essentially was make an "o-ring" from hemp fibers and waxed it with black pitch that I made, and this I put into a groove I gouged on the inside lip of the lid. Secondly, you can see in the picture, I put another hemp ring in the gap between the lid and horn after packing the gap full of that black pitch, and it works very well, only a drop or two came out. But, I think after swelling, it should be 100% watertight.

Thanks again!

Kind regards,
SAO
Now fill it with some peri-peri sauce for real "fire" water...
 
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I've been meaning to formulate a more in depth topic about what I am going to try to say here. I think what Necchi is saying is relevant to it.
I understand where you are coming from on this. You know these were used historically in you're area of the world. You wish to emulate that in a historicallycorrectway. You want your whisky to taste like it always does.
These last two are the rub that causes the friction.
One of the hardest things for us to do, I think, is, as modern people trying to do things in a historical way, to put our modern expectations aside when it comes to assessing the results of an experimental/experiential archeology project.
We seek subconsciously to use historically correct materials and techniques to get a modern result.
Well, maybe, not getting that result is the correct answer.
Period footwear did not keep your feet dry. Think on the men, and women who's wet feet came before us.
The whiskey from their horns may not have tasted the same as at home. It was part of their life. Think on the circumstances of their lives that lead them to be carrying whiskey afield in a horn. What were they going through that made it okay that the whiskey tasted slightly of horn? That they were grateful just to have that whiskey?

If we seek the experiences of our ancestors we may occasionally just have to except them for what they are. And often what they are may be uncomfortable or less than ideal by our standards.
Bneck, I heartly endorse your seniments. The old business I inherited dates from earlier than 1756. I still have tools and samples from it's Incorporation in 1786 and still use the methods they used. Doe's any one know how silver wire was made for the embroider's ?? O.D.
 

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