Which is the better rifle type ?

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I am trying to figure out what would be a better hunting rifle type. A local hunting club are selling some flintlock rifles and they are kind of pricey but as I have seen most flintlock rifles that aren't made of plastic and synthetics are. They are selling a Thopmson Center Renegade that was bored to .58 caliber, a Pedersoli Jaeger Target Rifle in .54 caliber, a Track of the Wolf 1792 Contract Rifle in .54 caliber and various American longrifles in calibers ranging from .32 to .62. The Renegade is $850 and was bored by a man named Bobby or Bob Hoyt, the Pedersoli Jaeger is $900 and the 1792 Contract is $800. The long rifles in calibers .45 to .62 go from $700-$1800. I will be exclusively hunting white tail deer as there is nothing else in my area worth hunting with a rifle. Which of these weapons would you here on the forum more experienced than me make your hunting rifle if you could only have one, I don't really know much about hunting with muzzleloaders as I only ever hunted with a Single Shot Westernfield 12ga, Traditional Muzzleloaders seem like something I could get into but I want to find out which one of these rifles would be the best overall as I don't want to have 5 rifles to do the job of one rifle. Thank you to all who add their input to this thread.
 

deermanct

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I personally don't know flintlock rifles as I only shoot percussion lock guns.
Probably any one of those would be good. I'm partial to 45's though. It's a good deer caliber.
Bobby Hoyt does excellent work and is well known and respected.
I'm sure that others here will have some input on the subject.
 
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Well darn, I guess you are abandoning deer hunting with your Brown Bess. Well if I was to buy one of these rifles I would be torn between the Renegade and the 1792. The man who bored that Renegade is good at his craft and Mr. Hoyt delivers. The 1792 Contract Rifle is just neat because it is out there and not many people I know have hunt with one much less own one. The Pedersoli Jaeger seems decent as well. I'm sure others on this forum will give better input as I am also new to Traditional Muzzleloading and I have a smoothbore that is long enough to touch a target. The Renegade is a Hawken style I believe so you would get good handling and it has an adjustable rear sight I assume so there is that. .58 cal will knock down a white tail effectively. The 1792 Contract is definitely a longer rifle than T/C .58 and the Jaeger and .54 once again will kill a deer, your weapon will be unique and it will be yours. The Pedersoli Jaeger is cool but the target version has those wierd target sights that throw the whole gun off. Lastly Long Rifles are the most popular flintlock rifles around and you can make your own at any time. In my opinion I would let them slide and focus on the Jaeger, Renegade and 1792. Personally I wouldn't know what to buy but the 1792 sounds cool.
 

PathfinderNC

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It would really be great if you were able to shoot the ones you are most interested in. For a caliber targeting larger game like deer I agree with the fellow above that .45 would be a good one, certainly not smaller. So many choices!
 

Grenadier1758

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I would like to know the rate of twist for the Jaeger or the 1792 Trade Rifle.

As a strictly hunting rifle, the Renegade in 58 caliber would be the top choice. In terms of interest, the 1792 would be a very effective hunting rifle and historically interesting. The 1792 rifle was originally specified as a 49 caliber rifle and some may have been bored out to 54 caliber for Meriwether Lewis and the Corps of Discovery. The Jaeger rifle or the Renegade might be the handiest for use in heavily forested hunting territory.

In other words any of the three rifles would be good hunting rifles.
 
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I would like to know the rate of twist for the Jaeger or the 1792 Trade Rifle.

As a strictly hunting rifle, the Renegade in 58 caliber would be the top choice. In terms of interest, the 1792 would be a very effective hunting rifle and historically interesting. The 1792 rifle was originally specified as a 49 caliber rifle and some may have been bored out to 54 caliber for Meriwether Lewis and the Corps of Discovery. The Jaeger rifle or the Renegade might be the handiest for use in heavily forested hunting territory.

In other words any of the three rifles would be good hunting rifles.
All 3 flintlock rifles have a rate of twist of 1:66.
 

Grenadier1758

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Based on the twist and how the rifle felt on the shoulder as to which one I would pick. All are round ball rifles.

I would have to like what I see being offered.

Of the three rifles, none are the necessarily better than the other.
 

Artificer

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I am trying to figure out what would be a better hunting rifle type. A local hunting club are selling some flintlock rifles and they are kind of pricey but as I have seen most flintlock rifles that aren't made of plastic and synthetics are. They are selling a Thopmson Center Renegade that was bored to .58 caliber, a Pedersoli Jaeger Target Rifle in .54 caliber, a Track of the Wolf 1792 Contract Rifle in .54 caliber and various American longrifles in calibers ranging from .32 to .62. The Renegade is $850 and was bored by a man named Bobby or Bob Hoyt, the Pedersoli Jaeger is $900 and the 1792 Contract is $800. The long rifles in calibers .45 to .62 go from $700-$1800. I will be exclusively hunting white tail deer as there is nothing else in my area worth hunting with a rifle. Which of these weapons would you here on the forum more experienced than me make your hunting rifle if you could only have one, I don't really know much about hunting with muzzleloaders as I only ever hunted with a Single Shot Westernfield 12ga, Traditional Muzzleloaders seem like something I could get into but I want to find out which one of these rifles would be the best overall as I don't want to have 5 rifles to do the job of one rifle. Thank you to all who add their input to this thread.
DON'T BUY ANY OF THEM......until you get a chance to shoulder them and if at all possible, with you actually wearing the Hunting Shirt/Vest/Jacket/Coat that you will hunt with. Yes, I know it is Late Spring/Early Summer and it is warm to hot (depending on where you live), but I'd take the Hunting Clothes I would wear that cover the top of my body to the sale, put them on and try the rifles for best fit.

I would ask permission to try the lock on each rifle to see how it sparks, as well as I would really like to dry fire the ones (if any) that don't have set triggers - to see how the trigger feels.

If it were me, I would tend to favor the 1792 contract rifle, though some of the other long rifles might be even better, depending on how they fit you.

The Renegade in .58 might be faster handling in the brush and trees you have in Maryland, though if you EVER have an inkling to do any kind of living history or re-enacting, that AINT the gun for it.

Gus
 

Artificer

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P.S. Just for your information, Bluebook Gun Value on a 54 Cal. 90% condition Renegade is $535.00. That is MORE than enough rifle for Eastern White Tail Deer. So, frankly, I would not be interested in the Renegade for your hunting at $ 850.00 even though Bobby Hoyt reamed/rifled it.

Gus
 

Art Caputo

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I went through the OP’s mental process a few decades ago, with a similar goal of being predominately a whitetail hunter, and wanting to give the flintlock a try after having success with the percussion muzzleloader. I have since been a flintlock shooter, but it wasn’t without having to go through some trials and tribulations. While have shot and hunted with calibers ranging from 40-62, the bulk of my deer hunting success has been with .45 and .50 cal rifles using LRB’s....plenty with a well placed shot at my average distance of 50 yards or less, furthest about 110 paces. My first flintlock was one of the many mass produced models. In hindsight, this was truly a false economy, ultimately finding out that my preference in styling, barrel/lock quality, and overall ergonomics and shooting performance could be had for not that much more in price, and perhaps the same or less if one accounts for time and energy expended. Its not to say that one cannot be successful with a factory rifle, but, there can be a quite a bit of difference in the aforementioned characteristics between them, vs one of the many semi-custom(IeTVM), kits(ie Kibler), or a good used custom or semi-custom rifle. It’s wise that you are doing some homework before making a decision. Just some thoughts.
 
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If I were to. Buy one it would be the 1792 rifle. I have a particular interest in Contract rifles, and will be building my version of one. The original 1792s were essentially unadorned base model Lancaster hunting rifles. The Track version in my estimation is essentially a fantasy piece meant to represent something Lewis and Clark might, again might have commissioned for their trip west. That doesn't make the Track rifle any less desirable as a hunting rifle. Given it is more of a period correct longrifle and is based on hunting rifle design of era I'd chose it over the others, whether I was hunting in modern clothes or period clothing. As for handiness in the woods hunters were using long rifles in more heavily forested land in 1792. Why should it be any harder today?
 
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n3wyu

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If I may add my 3 cents ( 3 cents because of inflation) I would check first to see what caliber's are legal to hunt deer with in you area or the area you intend to hunt in. Some areas, you have to use 50 caliber or bigger. All of the flintlock you mentioned would do the job, however you wouldn't want to purchase one just to find out you couldn't use it for hunting.
 

Kingwalter

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P.S. Just for your information, Bluebook Gun Value on a 54 Cal. 90% condition Renegade is $535.00. That is MORE than enough rifle for Eastern White Tail Deer. So, frankly, I would not be interested in the Renegade for your hunting at $ 850.00 even though Bobby Hoyt reamed/rifled it.

Gus
That’s very true. I live out west and proffer larger heavier calibers, but not really necessary for deer.
 
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martin9

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Like Nameless said I'd look a lot closer at the "various longrifles". Look at the ones that DON'T have stuff stamped all over the barrel you may find a nice hand built custom there for the same money as the production guns.
 

SDSmlf

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The Renegade is $850 and was bored by a man named Bobby or Bob Hoyt
P.S. Just for your information, Bluebook Gun Value on a 54 Cal. 90% condition Renegade is $535.00. That is MORE than enough rifle for Eastern White Tail Deer. So, frankly, I would not be interested in the Renegade for your hunting at $ 850.00 even though Bobby Hoyt reamed/rifled it.
To have Mr. Hoyt open up a bore to 58 caliber will cost about $150 plus what it costs for you to get it to him. Currently have a couple one inch TC barrels (one each flint and percussion) he rebored to 58 caliber with 1-60 radius rifling. They are two of my best shooters.

But at $850, agree with @Artificer, the asking price is more than a bit high for a Renegade, even with a Hoyt rebore, although I haven’t purchased one lately, and prices are going crazy…. Suggest you look around more. Maybe place a wanted ad in the forum classified.
 
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