When did yarn stitching show up on capotes?

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Clanman92

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So I am sewing a capote for a late era 1840’s style rendezvous capote using the reservation box pattern. I’ve seen some capotes stitched together on the outside with wool yarn, is that pc? Whether it is or not I’m dead set on stitching it this way but I’m just curious if there are any examples of them being sewn that way in history or if it’s a modern thing, thanks.
 

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Loyalist Dave

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As decorative or as a means of holding garment pieces together, or both ??

I think that's a tough call, because we know a huge portion of the population in Canada used the garment, a lot of folks in the United States and in Territories also used it, but..., very very few examples survive and only slightly more are documented in artwork.

THEN you have the question, since you're asking if it's modern, you have the question "who" would've done it. IF a garment is embellished, and with WHAT it is embellished, can be culturally specific. For example, I made a beaded Native dress for a woman, and had to be very careful to use the same size glass beads that would've been available to her, AND I had to also be careful not to use a pattern or symbols in the beadwork that had significant meaning to Native Americans, that did not apply to the garment.

I think the only real way to answer the question is to get some home spun yarn, and see if it can even be used for sewing or for embellishment. It might be too weak. A lot of modern yard, even when it says "100%" wool is not..., because they need in some cases just a tiny bit of synthetic fibers to give the wool enough strength to be spun in certain machines.

IF home spun yarn is too weak, you have your answer..., it would not have come about until modern spinning methods made the yarn strong enough.

LD

PS the above is to answer "when"..., as far as "should" you do it, well it's your coat, and you can do what you want, eh?
 
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The yarn stitching on capote is the same as blanket stitching used to keep wool blankets from unraveling. The idea for yarn stitching capotes, at least the raw edges, came along with the blankets themselves.
 

old ugly

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if you have a blanket to make a Capote that means you have all the yarn you would need to sew it up.
when making your Capote you rip the blanket, don't cut it .
once it is ripped you can probably remove a few rows of yarn which you could use to sew it together with.
this is just a guess i don't know if it was done.
i do know whenn i made mine i had lots of pcs left over and if i had planned ahead i could have got enough threads/yarn from the scrap to sew the whole thing.
ou
 

tenngun

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We know of a Capote from Canada cr 1830 that is embroidered with dyed moose hair. And from the 1780s we have a reference to a silver tasseled capote. So we know some decoration was done on the capotes.
Paintings from the north woods often show a white capote with red trim at the edges
So no one can say X or big blanket sticking was not done by some one at some time.
However it looks like it was done in the 60s, 70s and eighties. Even when the Indian cut became popular we don’t see paintings or photographs
As far as we can tell capotes of the 1840s and before we’re more tailored and not boxy. Should you wear both styles once you figure out real quick why there was a preference for tailored
If you haven’t cut out your blanket yet you might look at Northwest Traders as they offer easy to use patterns.
The “Old Tailor” is a direct copy from a coat in the museum of man in Ottawa Canada
A Duffle style was also common. These have one piece bodies with a cut to give it a yoke. Fitted sleeves and can be fitted to the waist
Miller’s ‘Trappers Bride’ shoes a man in this style capote, it’s just as easy to make as boxy capote
And authentic to the time.
Note the fitted sleeves and the lack of seam under the arm pit. This looks to be a fitted one piece body but a tailored fit.
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tenngun

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These seems are sew on the inside so ‘fancy yarn’ stitching would not be seen
 

waksupi

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The first I know of it was 1890's natives doing it. That is the actual period the pattern you used came from. Something to make yours more like the originals, cut that fringe off the shoulders!
 
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