What would you have done?

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Loyalist Dave

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Wait on him, take pics of the incident With your cell phone or better a video, make sure he comes too you on your property, record the exchange, then immediatly call the D.N.R. AND HAVE THE IDIOT ARRESTED, YOU DID SAY HE THREATEN TOO SHOOT YOU RIGHT. PRESS CHARGES FOR TRESPASSING AND TERRORISTIC THREATS. Or wait till he goes somewhere one day and saw the [email protected]@@@s tree stand down.

Careful, he may have cameras as well.....
NO, his having a camera will not be an issue, so long as you're not breaking the law. I'd just tell him right off when you see him next that you're video taping him, and if he doesn't wish to be video and audio recorded, he can leave with his mouth closed, but remaining and speaking with you is consent. Be sure the cameras are running first so that your warning is captured on the video.

You will need some trail cameras too. He will mess with your area if he gets too frustrated. I'd also put up "No Hunting" signs on your side of the property facing his....,

The bit about "my shooting lane" is a huge giveaway..., this is the same type of person that thinks the space in front of their home on a public street is "theirs". The other commenters are correct, he has no business tossing a shot over your boundary.

What he's likely to do, is make false complaints on you to force you to stop using the land for hunting.

LD
 

Tom A Hawk

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Lots of good advice above. As mentioned, his elevated platform stand is 680 yards away from the boundary line. There is no place for him place a trail cam on his side and I have no need to go there. On the other hand, he has to pass through a hedgerow to enter my property and there are numerous placed for a hidden camera. We will see how this develops. My impression is that of an odd, immature person. I do understand his resentment regarding out-of-towners however. Many years ago we had a group of hunters from Long Island who would cruise into town once year, form deer drives through everybody's else's property without concern. Everybody hated them.

In my situation he is actually the out of towner having purchased his place in the past couple of years. My property has been in the family for nearly 100 years and the road bears my name.
 

Woody Morgan

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Sounds like a nice place for informal target shooting and baring your backside frequently 🤣
In the spirit of British humo(u)r...
1637971249739.png

By the way, did you know that "humour" is also defined as "moist vapor"?
Lends a whole new meaning to "humourous", doesn't it?

wm
 
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retrieverman

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I see both sides of this situation. If the OP is hunting his property, it’s his right to hunt where he wants to even if it’s on the fence line. However, as a property owner that has to deal with fence hunters, it p*sses me off that my neighbors (leasers not owners) set up their stands within rock throwing distance from my property. I get at least one call a year for permission to track a wounded deer onto my place.
 

Brokennock

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He says, "You're in my shooting lane." "I might shoot you".
If you are on your own property you can't be in his shooting lane,,, unless,,,,, he is planning to shoot deer on your property from his stand.
You could always take, "I might shoot you," as a threat, him stating he might shoot you because you are in his shooting lane (which apparently extends onto your property), and turn him in under the "red flag" laws. It'll take him until passed the end of deer season to get his guns back, if, he does manage to get them back.
 

Tom A Hawk

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I see both sides of this situation. If the OP is hunting his property, it’s his right to hunt where he wants to even if it’s on the fence line. However, as a property owner that has to deal with fence hunters, it p*sses me off that my neighbors (leasers not owners) set up their stands within rock throwing distance from my property. I get at least one call a year for permission to track a wounded deer onto my place.
At least they have the curtesy to ask.
 

Tom A Hawk

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If you are on your own property you can't be in his shooting lane,,, unless,,,,, he is planning to shoot deer on your property from his stand.
You could always take, "I might shoot you," as a threat, him stating he might shoot you because you are in his shooting lane (which apparently extends onto your property), and turn him in under the "red flag" laws. It'll take him until passed the end of deer season to get his guns back, if, he does manage to get them back.
Oooo. I like the sound of that.
 
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First be sure of your data. If possible ,know your surveyed corners. Do not guess.
Find out who the man is and what he does. See if you have a mutual friend
who can sponsor a truce between him and you. He needs you and you need him if
the best experience is to be had. You can totally ruin his hunting by scaring away
all deer-- as he can do to you. See if you can do a friendly sit-down with him and
get to know him. Become a Dale Carnegie. Avoid confrontations. Make friends,
and share the experience out there at the place you hunt. See who the ag owners
are and if you can make friends there. Always offer a written release of liability to
anyone who allows you to hike, hunt or camp on their land. chances are you have
a lot in common with that guy--IF ONLY YOU KNEW HIM. NOW GET TO KNOW HIM.
 

retrieverman

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If you are on your own property you can't be in his shooting lane,,, unless,,,,, he is planning to shoot deer on your property from his stand.
You could always take, "I might shoot you," as a threat, him stating he might shoot you because you are in his shooting lane (which apparently extends onto your property), and turn him in under the "red flag" laws. It'll take him until passed the end of deer season to get his guns back, if, he does manage to get them back.
Personally, I wouldn’t invoke the “red flag” crap, because in my opinion, that’s a democrat move. He could also turn it around and make something up to use it on the OP. In my opinion, that’s a bad precedent to set.
 
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I would just call the game warden, and tell him what you've experienced...not only is it hunter harassment, but also threat of wanton/reckless discharge of a firearm...the game warden doesn't need any proof at all. He is allowed to respectfully ring the guys doorbell and ask him questions about it. He can't make an arrest or issue a citation over it unless you have proof...but a game warden is a citizen who is allowed to ring another citizens doorbell and ask any question he wants, at least until asked to leave, in which case he will have to respectfully leave...and they do do this...

The guy will get the message, and probably leave you alone afterwards, in which case you can record further incidents.
 
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Tom A Hawk

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I would just call the game warden, and tell him what you've experienced...not only is it hunter harassment, but also threat of wanton/reckless discharge of a firearm...the game warden doesn't need any proof at all. He is allowed to respectfully ring the guys doorbell and ask him questions about it. He can't make an arrest or issue a citation over it unless you have proof...but a game warden is a citizen who is allowed to ring another citizens doorbell and ask any question he wants, at least until asked to leave, in which case he will have to respectfully leave...and they do do this...

The guy will get the message, and probably leave you alone afterwards, in which case you can record further incidents.
Thank you. It is harassment as I see it, but since there is not a direct game aspect, I think I'll start with the State Police and get their input.
 
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Thank you. It is harassment as I see it, but since there is not a direct game aspect, I think I'll start with the State Police and get their input.
No. The game warden is in fact a state police officer with all of the same power as one and his purpose is to handle these issues, as it is an area of specialization that general state police officers just don't have the time and knowledge for. The CO's exist as a department inside of the state police department specifically to take this work off of the state police's hands, as busy as they are...

If it is related to something that happens while hunting, the game warden is the one who can best handle it. A state police officer will have other work to do, which he will have to leave, in order to come talk to you. You would likely get a very brief and unsatisfactory service from a standard state police officer.
 

Tom A Hawk

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No. The game warden is in fact a state police officer with all of the same power as one and his purpose is to handle these issues, as it is an area of specialization that general state police officers just don't have the time and knowledge for. The CO's exist as a department inside of the state police department specifically to take this work off of the state police's hands, as busy as they are...

If it is related to something that happens while hunting, the game warden is the one who can best handle it. A state police officer will have other work to do, which he will have to leave, in order to come talk to you. You would likely get a very brief and unsatisfactory service from a standard state police officer.
Good information. Thanks.
 
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I wish you luck...sometimes just a simple knock on the door can solve matters without further issue. You should not be having to deal with this, as you are acting within the law, and have earned your days off...
 
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My wife and I like to watch the warden shows on TV. Saw one situation a lot like you are experiencing, only a bit worse. Everytime the complainant would sit his stands that were within sight of the border line, the neighbor would fire up the chain saw and pretend to be cutting things along the border fence and/or run back and forth on the ATV, etc. Clearly hunter harassment.

Two of the local wardens sat the complainant's stands, then video documented the jackass next door with his chainsaw and ATV antics. They then proceeded to arrest him for hunter harassment.

DO NOT become the harasser via revenge actions like making noise, etc. to disrupt him as others have suggested. The law is on your side.

I'd contact the area warden and start building the case.

On the lease I used to be on we had to deal with a very similar neighbor who thought our land was his. He verbally assaulted one of our female members as she left our property on an easement through another property his land bordered. She was scared to death. The coward wasn't so bold when her 6'4" ex- marine husband came off the lease the same way the next evening. Well, he started out the same yelling every four-letter obscenity, but the husband just went face-to- face with him in firm but reasonable manner that shut him down. The confrontations were documented with the local warden as well as the county sheriff. We had a few other issues and finally law enforcement paid the jerk a personal visit at his house. That pretty much ended it. I say "pretty much" because we would find deer testicles on our gate by the easement, etc. The warden said he was half a bubble off plumb.
 
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