What happened to Pedersoli's diet and exercise program?

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The only generalization I'm making is that shotgun barrels were thinner before choke tubes. It is an overgeneralization, but not that far from reality. I gave some examples of meat and potatoes guns that anybody could buy. Before choke tubes, these had barrels as thin as choke tubes are today. Absolutely, there are some thick barrels out there from pre-choke tubes, especially when you are talking the off gauges like 16 gauge. For 12 gauge though, the majority were too thin to have normal choke tubes installed. Some of them could, but I wouldn't call it the majority by any means. That's why Pedersoli made their barrels thicker. It wasn't for any safety reason, it was so they could thread them for choke tubes.
Not so sorry. Pedersoli put their most weight on around the hips! From the breech and about 7" forward.
The early ones almost look parallel and narrow at the breech. The later ones are much wider at the breech so it could be argued it was done for, in your words " safety ". My words would be " lawyer proof"!
 
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Some time in the 80's. Early 80's.
My guess is some lawyer advised Mr Pedersoli that if some fool loaded one of his doubles badly and harmed himself he might find himself being sued.
Similar to what happened to American rifle producers and their triggers in the early 90s.
Early 1980s I was 185-195, as soon as my pants felt a little tight I would be careful for a few weeks
Now I’m 220 and have to be careful, and in usually not
I’ve noticed the ground has gotten harder, hills steeper cold nights colder over the years.
 

SDSmlf

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Early 1980s I was 185-195, as soon as my pants felt a little tight I would be careful for a few weeks
Now I’m 220 and have to be careful, and in usually not
I’ve noticed the ground has gotten harder, hills steeper cold nights colder over the years.
Eating one’s self out of their clothes seems to be pretty common and easy as we age.
 
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Not the ones I've seen friend🧐
i'm with Brit Smoothy on this. While there is probably a lot of variation in 19th century guns, depending on their intended use, 3 of the four I have are lighter than the newer Pedersolis. The Henry Egg is just over 6 1/2 pounds, the Moore and Harris is just under 7, and the Joseph Manton (which looks to be a live pigeon gun) is just over 8.

That doesn't mean that Hardware Store guns made for the New World market were not heavier, which would be less skill intensive to produce.

I love my 1978 Pedersoli, which is just under 6 pounds (unloaded).
 
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I have now acquired an "old", lightweight Pedersoli. I have had the "new" model in 20 and 12 gauge and they each weigh the same. According to the website and For Sale ads, the 10 gauge weighs the same as the 12 and 20. Mine are each 7 pounds, 4 ounces. The "old" 12 that I just got is 5 pounds 12 ounces. It is thinner between the locks, the locks are smaller and the wrist is thinner. The barrels are quite a bit narrower at the breach. Although a 12, the barrels at the breach are a bit thinner than my current 20. The 5 pounds 12 ounces is well balanced between the hands. For upland hunts, this "old" 12 can readily take the place of my "new" 12 and 20, as it is much more pleasant to carry and balances and swings more fluidly.

I'm tempted to part with my "new" fat 12 gauge and replace it with a 10 gauge. I would use the fat 12, or a 10 for waterfowl and driven birds, where volume shooting is more likely and carrying it around isn't much. My fat 12 has the choke tubes making it pretty versatile, but for the same weight a 10 gauge would do just as well. Right now the only advantage the fat 12 has is the shared components with the "old" 12. One less item to buy and store. Either way, I am set for all my wingshooting needs. Well, I would like a SxS percussion 36 gauge (410)!
 
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Some more discovery:

My 12b percussion shotguns bores vary from .727 to .733 (pretty common for a 12 gauge). This "old" lightweight Pedersoli measures .716. That's a 12 1/2 gauge technically. Not quite 13 gauge that would be around .710.

I've heard references to these older Pedersoli's having "tight" chokes. Well you might think so if you use a conventional "choke gauge" or just measured the chokes. The chokes are .706 and .698 respectively. When taken in comparison with the nominal bore diameter of .716, the chokes are .10 constriction (Improved Cylinder) and .18 constriction (Light Modified).

This gun is going to be perfect for the job I got it for.
 
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I have had two of the Pedersoli 12 gauge percussions i the past.! it seems like i am not able to hold on to the good stuff.? I should perhaps look for a smaller 20 gauge or 36 gauge in order to compensate for age and gaining pounds/kilos..?
 

Bigpete

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I don't find the recoil harsh in my 6lb Pedersoli sxs with ounce plus loads at all.
In my 10g I shoot 2oz over 90gn 3f or finer.
No recoil pads.
No problem.
I like recoil, tells me something good just happened.
I always suggest an airgun for low recoil.
Or a 22 lol
 

Bigpete

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I have a mid 1800s 12 bore double from probably Belgium that weighs ten pounds with 36 inch barrels. Certainly not an upland bird gun.
My old Gerty weighs around 8lb,similar time frame and place of manufacturing
 

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