What do you use to keeps nipples from seizing?

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This is one of those things that never goes away. I believe the key thing is to
bust the nipples loose after every shooting session or two. You can use
anti-seize,mobile 1 grease, Bear grease, crisco or vaseline or your choice.
That Bruce Waugh guy in Arizona makes the best cylinder blocks for ease
of working on nipples. What I have noticed is that if I take the short cut and
skip cleaning nipples, that after several times out at the range, the nipples tend
to take more torque to loosen up. People that skip cleaning the nipples pay for
it, given some time, in tough to loosen or stuck nipples.
 
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A good day at the range today. Only fired about 10 rounds. When cleaning I tried to get the nipple out and it was the most difficult one I can remember. Siezed is probably a bit strong but even when I got it loose it continued to be a mother to unscrew, After about 3 turns my hand was so sore ( 3" bar ) I changed tactics. I put in my bucket of water and gave it a few pumps, pulled it out and the nipple was still tight as hell. I figured I must be pulling crud up with it in the threads so I screwed it back in about a full turn and that was enough to clear it . I always put a tiny dab of oil on the threads after cleaning and wipe off any excess before screwing it back in. I was wondering if any of you have a more reliable method.
Regardless of if it's my percussion rifle or my cap & ball revolver I remove the nipple(s) and place it into a small container that has a secure top, fill with clean water and a drop of dish soap, shake then set aside while I clean the rest. I also always replace the factory nipples with stainless steel ones or the bronze if available. No chance of rust that way plus the factory nipples are lousy. Anyway, after rinsing the nipple with clean water then drying, I put a drop of Birchwood Casey Barricade on the threads. One drop only, and if you put too much on just wipe with a paper towel. I've done this on all my percussion guns and there has never been a problem even if I don't shoot those guns for several years. Barricade is my favorite rust prevention oil so it goes on all my guns anyway. Hope this helps and good luck to you.
 
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waksupi

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Myself and other gun builders will advise to only remove the nipple once a year, to put on fresh anti-seize, or replace if accuracy has fallen off. What you are experiencing, is why. Cumulative thread damage, eventually resulting in blowing the nipple out
Taking the nipple out is actually detrimental for cleaning procedures. Do you wash your vehicles with your garden hose, and not use a pressure nozzle? Same theory applies, high pressure cleans better. Liquid can not compress, so developing pressure is all that it can do when under force, making it more efficient in cleaning. Definitely a plus in those cursed patent breeches.
Just clean with the nipple in, dry the bore well, and put oil in the nipple to prevent corrosion.
 
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What others say; there is difference between Oil and Grease, and there are different types of Grease.
Most oil are not heat resistant nor are the "ant-sieze".
Now what did they use in the olden days? I don't know but I assume the same grease they used on wagon wheels.
As for them who clean only once a year (or never at all), I say to each their own. I clean after every outing, unless going out again the next day. Just take care when threading, don't 'cross thread' - begin by turning Counterclockwise until you feel the 'drop' then Lightly turn clockwise, if it resists then STOP, begin again or find out why it's binding - and Don't Over Tighten, it's not going to fly off and 'put your eye out'.
I like Birchwood choke Lube myself, never had a problem.
 

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Notchy Bob

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Just for the record, it is my understanding that pine tar was used for lubricating wagon axles. A heavily loaded wagon created quite a lot of friction on the axles. Friction produces heat. Pine tar is thick and heavy, but I think it would soften up pretty quickly once the wheels started turning, but would not totally disintegrate. It would "cling," or stay in place. A softer grease, such as lard or tallow, would probably liquefy and disintegrate in a very short time. The two-wheeled "Red River carts" used by the Metis people apparently got very little lubrication. People who traveled in company with these carts commented on the infernal screeching they made as the wheels turned.

I would agree with @Mad L 's recommendations in post #71, particularly with respect to preventing cross threading when the nipple is installed.

Best regards,

Notchy Bob
 

morehops52

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Wow, a lot of good info and suggestions. Me thinks that since I have a good variety of auto lubes around I'll start there. I don't need to buy anything more that will last me 900 years!
Thanks to all for your input.
 

Brent

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Shotgun choke tube grease works perfectly, and I recommend pulling your nipples every time you clean. I have never had a nipple problem doing this.
 
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A good day at the range today. Only fired about 10 rounds. When cleaning I tried to get the nipple out and it was the most difficult one I can remember. Siezed is probably a bit strong but even when I got it loose it continued to be a mother to unscrew, After about 3 turns my hand was so sore ( 3" bar ) I changed tactics. I put in my bucket of water and gave it a few pumps, pulled it out and the nipple was still tight as hell. I figured I must be pulling crud up with it in the threads so I screwed it back in about a full turn and that was enough to clear it . I always put a tiny dab of oil on the threads after cleaning and wipe off any excess before screwing it back in. I was wondering if any of you have a more reliable method.
Walrus plasma-just kidding. Automotive anti-seize that is used on spark plug threads.
 

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