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SOLANCO

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Put a dumpster behind the house. Convenient to the garage/barn and our basement door. Cleaned out open half of the barn. Wood and construction scraps. Old leaky hoses. "Precious" wood saved from the old barn. Old hanging baskets. Two old steel patio chairs. Lord knows what all. Still got more garage and basement to do. Only been in this home 15 years but if you have space you will fill it. Not always wisely.

Mail lady delivered a sweet .36 Repro Colt 1846 police and gorgeous holster. Thank you griffiga!
 

eggwelder

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Had 2 showings of the house today, both parties booked second showings for tomorrow. Made brass ramrod pipes for my .22 flint build
 

Rum River

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Worked on my wife's Farmall Super A tractor. Had drained the gas tank to work on a fuel leak on/around the sediment bowl. Dealer in antique tractor parts suggested replacing the standard rubber gasket with a cork type. Cork model was a slightly larger size. Hmmm, why? Trimmed it to fit. Put a half gallon of gas in the tank and watched fuel start to leak out of the on/off valve itself - while it was closed. Great. Pumped out as much of the half gallon as I could, turned on the valve to drain the remainder into a gas can. My trim job on the cork gasket did NOT work, a couple cups of gas everywhere. Proceed to remove the sediment bowl assembly so I can have it with to buy a complete replacement. A 3/4" wrench is too big, an 11/16" is too small - 18mm is just right. Huh? On a Farmall tractor from 1952? Now I know why the cork gasket didn't fit. Time to find the correct assembly and move on.......oops, the store closed 20 minutes ago.

Of course it did.....
 

Eric Krewson

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I have lived in my current house for 20 years, the concrete driveways have never been cleaned. I never though much about it until I sold my 32' camper and noticed one side of the concrete in front of my shop was white from where the camper protected it and the other side dingy black and gray.

Knowing how tedious using the spray nozzle on my pressure washer to clean large expanses of concrete is I ordered a surface cleaner to fit my rig.

First I had to retrieve my pressure washer from my neighbor, I never used it, he needed one often so I let him keep it in his shop. While I had it I decided to change the oil and found he had never checked the oil level level while he had it, the dipstick has a tiny smidgeon of oil on the very end. When I drained the oil there was less than a cup, dang. I topped off the crankcase and started the motor, it ran OK, I guess any damage done from lack of oil will come back to haunt me later.

I spent half a day going back and forth to Home Depot trying to find quick disconnects that would couple the surface cleaner to my pressure washer wand. On my third try I finally had pieced together the right parts to hook everything up.

The surface cleaner actually worked and worked quite well, slow and steady passes left a streakless concrete surface clean of all but the toughest stains. I did a few touch-ups for the very few places I had missed after the pad dried out. In the picture you can see the difference between the pad in front of my garage doors and the uncleaned filthy driveway I haven't cleaned yet. I quit for the day while working on the sidewalks, my botched hip replacement told me it was time. The sidewalk picture shows the daylight and dark contrast between the cleaned portion and 20 years worth of stains.

driveway washer.JPG

driveway day and night.JPG
 

bisleyjohn

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would be interesting to learn more about your competition, the format, courses of fire, results, photos, etc.
Unfortunately I shot like a (insulting term omitted) that, coupled with some extremely heavy rain meant that I stopped after an hour. I did discover that my Euroarms doesn’t like .375 conicals and a light load (12g Swiss No. 2). I didn’t shoot the second gun. Back to the drawing board.
 

eggwelder

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Went out to the shop to make a trigger plate and tang bolt For my .22. Was removing the breech plug to weld up the misplaced lock plate bolt hole, and of course, twisted it off due to the misplaced lock plate bolt hole. Plug was 3/8 Inch. Spent the afternoon drilling that out, retapped the hole and made a bigger (1/2 inch) breech plug. Lock plate bolt hole should not affect breechplug shear strength now. Done on the vice with a hand drill and a guide Jig, same way i breeched it the first time. Had no 27/64 end mills, so had to modify my only 27/64 drillbit into a “end mill“to flatten the bottom of the breech plug hole. If you do this, make sure you also grind off the cutting edges of the twists as they will shave away the sides of the hole if you do not hold it exactly straight, giving you a tapered hole. cut the bit at least in half if it is a standard length bit. The shorter one is much easier to control. Also, don`t use cheap-az taps. As i ground down the tap to thread the hole to the bottom, the thin leading cutting edges kept breaking off. Not always or catastrophic but it did get frustrating enough to to dig out the expensive taps and use those. Barrel is a touch shorter now and will re-inlet the barrel tang and re-drill the pin holes in the barrel lugs today if the weather does not clear.

lessons learned-(some lessons are the second time)
1. Cheap tools suck
2. Use a drill press or lathe if you possibly can- my barrel is too long for my drill press, and i have no lathe.
3. 3/8 breech plug is probably too small for a .22 if your lock plate bolt hole has to go thru it
4. Hands on experience is the best teacher-

Thats what i did yesterday
 

Bob McBride

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I have lived in my current house for 20 years, the concrete driveways have never been cleaned. I never though much about it until I sold my 32' camper and noticed one side of the concrete in front of my shop was white from where the camper protected it and the other side dingy black and gray.

Knowing how tedious using the spray nozzle on my pressure washer to clean large expanses of concrete is I ordered a surface cleaner to fit my rig.

First I had to retrieve my pressure washer from my neighbor, I never used it, he needed one often so I let him keep it in his shop. While I had it I decided to change the oil and found he had never checked the oil level level while he had it, the dipstick has a tiny smidgeon of oil on the very end. When I drained the oil there was less than a cup, dang. I topped off the crankcase and started the motor, it ran OK, I guess any damage done from lack of oil will come back to haunt me later.

I spent half a day going back and forth to Home Depot trying to find quick disconnects that would couple the surface cleaner to my pressure washer wand. On my third try I finally had pieced together the right parts to hook everything up.

The surface cleaner actually worked and worked quite well, slow and steady passes left a streakless concrete surface clean of all but the toughest stains. I did a few touch-ups for the very few places I had missed after the pad dried out. In the picture you can see the difference between the pad in front of my garage doors and the uncleaned filthy driveway I haven't cleaned yet. I quit for the day while working on the sidewalks, my botched hip replacement told me it was time. The sidewalk picture shows the daylight and dark contrast between the cleaned portion and 20 years worth of stains.

View attachment 77443
View attachment 77450
Hey Eric, because I live rural surrounded by 125’ Poplars, power washing the concrete and house is a twice a year ‘must do‘ job. I use the same setup as you. I’ll be doing mine next week. It takes me about 8 hours. I bought a big commercial power washer and a 15”surface cleaner much like yours this year. I sure hope it cuts an hour or two off of this very drab job. I have about 3k square feet of concrete. Ugh.
 

pooch156

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Hey Eric, because I live rural surrounded by 125’ Poplars, power washing the concrete and house is a twice a year ‘must do‘ job. I use the same setup as you. I’ll be doing mine next week. It takes me about 8 hours. I bought a big commercial power washer and a 15”surface cleaner much like yours this year. I sure hope it cuts an hour or two off of this very drab job. I have about 3k square feet of concrete. Ugh.
That's a lot of concrete
 

Trooper

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This afternoon, I cut up an old taekwondo shirt into 1-1/4" strips rolled each strip into a loose bundle then soaked them in melted mink oil. I have a few hundred pill bottle containers, the yellow plastic ones and some 35mm film canisters that will hold each loose roll. I then heated up a flat blade screwdriver tip to burn a slot into the cap of the roll container. Grap the center of the roll and feed the end through the canister slot then pack your completed patch material away for future use.
 

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