Wedge pin insertion- Right to Left or Left-Right ?

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Anybody know if it matters how you insert the wedge pin ?
Was reading a Lyman Great Plains rifle label literature, and it states inserting the pin "right to left".;
I've always seen it done opposite most of the time.
Would it affect anything ?
 

CTShooter

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I was wondering this the other day, the pictures of the one I’m modeling my GPR build on has them in with the heads on the left.
 

Rudyard

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All Govt and most all English makers run the KEY (its not a wedge) from the left to the right . So I do the same , and any screwed item is the same sling swivles , captive rods ,ect R to Left . Of course this isn't cast in stone so you put them as you fancy .
Rudyard
 
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my hunting rifles are left to right. reason being they are a tad long and the wedge end digs into my palm when i grip the forarm with them inserted right to left. could shorten them but just as easy to reverse them. bottom line if it works for you and your gun do it as you like.
second the slotting and capture pinning them. once had to use the small blade on a pocket knife temporary to keep the barrel from flopping when i pulled the RR . never did find that wedge.
 

SDSmlf

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Most manufacturers insert the wedges so the head is on the same side as the lock. Because most of the world is right-handed and it looks better in pictures.
@bubba.50 has as good as any answer. But personally, I am right handed and go left to right because I like how they ‘feel’, and then I also pin my wedges so as not to lose them or forget where they go. No right or wrong way in my opinion.
 

Notchy Bob

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Many years ago, my dad taught me that pins go “in from the right, out from the left.” However, original Hawken rifles used keys or wedges that went in from the left. I think @deerstalkert identified the reason for this, which I had not thought of before. It probably doesn’t matter which direction with pins, because they are typically flush with or even slightly below the level of the wood surface. Keys usually have a slight protrusion on the exit side.

Notchy Bob
 
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Just to keep my mind straight as it makes no real performance difference which side the keys, pins, bolts, or sights enter the stock or barrel, I like to have the keys (et al) enter the same direction as the lock bolts so I have a visual reference for the direction they should be installed.
 
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I had to go check my GPR! I built one 20 yrs ago, pins are right to left!
 

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How about revolver barrels? I always put the wedge in on the screw side. After turning screw in and out it doesn't seem to affect the wedge at all. Am I doing something wrong and/or can I put wedge in either side?
 
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Hi,
American makers did not seem to have any convention for orienting barrel keys. However, as Rudyard wrote, all British guns with keys have the heads on the side plate side of the gun. Here are examples:
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Snake Pleskin, it is not hard to pin the keys in place. I believe the GPR has escutcheon plates surrounding the keys that are screwed into the stock. Simply drill a series of 1/16" holes in a line down the center of the flat key. Cut between the holes with a jeweler's saw and file the slot even. Make sure it is long enough and close enough to the end of the key to clear the barrel lug. Remove the escutcheon plates on right or left side of the stock, doesn't matter. Cut short 1/16" pins from finishing nails or brads that will fit vertically inside the plates and go through the slots in the keys. Cut a little groove in the wood to fit the pin behind the plate and then put the key in the plate, position the pin in the slot behind the plate and place the whole assembly in the mortise for the plate. Screw it in place. Make sure the slot is filed wide enough so it slides easily on the pin. On guns without removable escutcheon plates, cut and file the slot in the key, place the key all the way in the stock, mark for a hole in the barrel channel such that it will allow the key to be slid out far enough to clear the barrel lug. Then, using a tiny drill (#58 or #59) drill into the barrel channel down into the slot of the key. Drill only as far as the bit reaches the key and goes through the slot but no further. Cut a short pin from the pointed end of a tiny (1/16" or less) brad. Place the pin in the hole in the barrel channel and tap the pin in until the point digs into the stock below the key. Don't be too aggressive. Just tap enough to sink the point and keep the pin in place. Grind or file off any excess pin sticking up in the barrel channel. Once pinned, the key can never be removed so make sure it fits the stock and barrel well and , slides smoothly. You can test how well it works with the pin in place but before setting the pin. On thicker stocks with big wide keys, you can replace the pin with a tiny screw that can be removed.

dave
 
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The screw is to retain the wedge by the little spring on a open top(Colt) type revolver. It doesn’t seem to work very well at that on several of my old reproductions. They are designed for the wedge to go in from the left side.
 
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