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Watching Jeremiah Johnson

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Two Feathers

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Mornin' gentlemen:
I too have JJ on DVD and watch it regularly, probably once a month? My wife keeps saying "Oh Lord, are you watching that movie AGAIN?" In the meantime she watches the same episode of House Hunters on HGTV at least 300 times? There's some kind of Irony in there, I'm just not sure where?

I also wondered about that "settling for a .32 cal. Hawken" statement myself? Truthfully (and somewhat embarrassingly) I never knew they made a .32 cal. Hawken?
Thanks fer lettin' me in here guys.
God bless:
Two Feathers
 

Atticus69

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I think your thinking of Wind Walker, made about the same time. All Indian story though Trevor Howard played the lead.
Winterhawk was about the kidnapping of a white woman and her young brother
You're right. Thanks for straightening me out. Hope other guys on here looking for that kind of show see your post.
 

Hatchet-Jack

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JJ and the Mountain Men are both just about is good as it gets. I remember watching A Man Called Horse quite a few times when I was a kid. I thought the Indians were scary. I just watched it with my wife the other night and now it comes off very silly. The Indians are all hoping around like little bunnies. We we're laughing quite a bit. Funny how things get dated and lose their affect after so many years.
 
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JJ and the Mountain Men are both just about is good as it gets. I remember watching A Man Called Horse quite a few times when I was a kid. I thought the Indians were scary. I just watched it with my wife the other night and now it comes off very silly. The Indians are all hoping around like little bunnies. We we're laughing quite a bit. Funny how things get dated and lose their affect after so many years.
Well, both those movies are good solid productions I agree with you on that...But as good as it gets, I'd have to disagree and state that Last of the Mohicans is as good as it gets...or The Patriot, with Mel Gibson is as good as it gets.

Bout fortunately its only opinion and like certain anatomical parts everybody has one. :cool:
 

Hatchet-Jack

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Well, both those movies are good solid productions I agree with you on that...But as good as it gets, I'd have to disagree and state that Last of the Mohicans is as good as it gets...or The Patriot, with Mel Gibson is as good as it gets.

Bout fortunately its only opinion and like certain anatomical parts everybody has one. :cool:
I was referring to movies about the western fur trade era. What other movies are better than those two when we're talking about Western Fur Trade era Mountain Men? They are probably the biggest reason most of us old timers got into Rendezvous and Black powder.

If we're talking Colonial 18th century movies I would agree Last of the Mohicans and The Patriot are bigger, newer productions, that had much larger budgets. I love both of these as well.
 
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I was referring to movies about the western fur trade era. What other movies are better than those two when we're talking about Western Fur Trade era Mountain Men? They are probably the biggest reason most of us old timers got into Rendezvous and Black powder.

If we're talking Colonial 18th century movies I would agree Last of the Mohicans and The Patriot are bigger, newer productions, that had much larger budgets. I love both of these as well.
I was talking about movies in general...definitely a broader topic. My apologies...
 

Jkil

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Just watched The Revenant. Several closeups of DeCaprio’s rifle. Looks to me like a well made Lehigh Valley, possibly a Herman Rupp. Soldier’s guns look like they should, early Springfields. Story was an amazing presentation of very early 19th Century Rocky Mtn culture; especially liked how Native Americans were done. Typical Hollywood though - one shot one kill on the run, never a misfire, never a time out for reloading.
 

Kenn

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Sigh . . . "Nothin' wrong with quiet."

I've thoroughly enjoyed "JJ," "Mohicans" & "Patriot."It's also surprising to discover little errors allowed to remain in films, such as jet contrails in John Wayne westerns, etc. What bugs me a little is that either very brief footage is devoted to showing reloads or it's not included at all. As for misfires -- quite rare unless the script calls for continued action as a result. Ah well. If that's all we have to concern ourselves, we must not have many serious problems.
 

Artificer

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I still get chastised for laughing at the inside joke in Jeremiah Johnson. In the beginning he laments that he had to buy a 32 Hawken. I am always reminded that the source literature documents the 32 caliber statement. Of course no one realized that in 1840 caliber, gauge, bore were used almost interchangeably. JJ had a 32 gauge Hawken certainly, which is roughly a 0.526" diameter bore. But that didn't fit well in the plot line, so they used caliber incorrectly.
This is sort of a "Duh" moment for me I never thought about them using caliber instead of gauge.

However, in September 1971 I saw a Hawken Mountain Rifle artfully displayed behind glass in a small museum in Denver, CO. At the bottom of the case, there were tiny round lead shot laid out next to a small bag, which I glanced over UNTIL I went around the side of the case and saw that .22 cal. hole in what otherwise was a "Mountain Rifle Size" Barrel Muzzle.

So by the time I saw the movie in 1972, I figured the ".32 Caliber" line in the movie, was just a typo made in the script, because I had seen an original Hawken in .22 caliber.

Gus
 

tenngun

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This is sort of a "Duh" moment for me I never thought about them using caliber instead of gauge.

However, in September 1971 I saw a Hawken Mountain Rifle artfully displayed behind glass in a small museum in Denver, CO. At the bottom of the case, there were tiny round lead shot laid out next to a small bag, which I glanced over UNTIL I went around the side of the case and saw that .22 cal. hole in what otherwise was a "Mountain Rifle Size" Barrel Muzzle.

So by the time I saw the movie in 1972, I figured the ".32 Caliber" line in the movie, was just a typo made in the script, because I had seen an original Hawken in .22 caliber.

Gus
Famous for their big bore rifles they made lots of small bore dainty guns, very Ohioish in looks.
Not Hawken, but western guns, Ive seen several Lemans in 30,or .36 caliber that looked otherwise like his big bore trade rifles, including full sized barrels
 

jonathan butcher

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Agree with you, the Revenant was really well done, maybe my favorite flintlock arms movie of all time. I'll also add that, unless a reload or a misfire were part of the plot development there really isn't any reason to include it, realism not withstanding. I worked with a movie company for a number of years and picked up a lot about how movie making is done and why. From the screenwriters and directors standpoint, every act no matter how insignificant should have a bearing on the story. For instance, if DiCaprio had a misfire, that misfire would have to have a plot angle, a reason important to the story. Example; DiCaprio's rifle misfired and as a result he was captured or wounded by the Indians. Or if his rifle misfired that misfire would occur again in a pivitol point of the movie, say with his final confrontation with Fitzgerald.
So even though misfires would realistic to depict, espeically for us gun guys, it would make no sense to include that detail which dosen't have relevance elsewhere and for a larger plot reason.
With all that said the makers really did a fine job in depicting the dirt, cruelty and tensions of early frontiersmen, more than any other movie that comes to mind. I've watched the Revenant six times. So far.

Just watched The Revenant. Several closeups of DeCaprio’s rifle. Looks to me like a well made Lehigh Valley, possibly a Herman Rupp. Soldier’s guns look like they should, early Springfields. Story was an amazing presentation of very early 19th Century Rocky Mtn culture; especially liked how Native Americans were done. Typical Hollywood though - one shot one kill on the run, never a misfire, never a time out for reloading.
 
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