very old caplock.

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Dibbuk

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My opinion only: After a thorough cleaning and oiling, I would shoot it a few times before I gave up on the bore. If it had a false muzzle at one time, I would have a replacement made. If you feel it absolutely MUST be rebored, I would rebore it as little as possible: if it is .32, rebore to .36. If it is .36, rebore to .40. etc
 

andy52

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As much as I appreciate being given this rifle if I had the barrel rebored to .40 I really don't know what I'd do with it. It's way to big to use for hunting and I don't see myself taking up chunk shooting. I had contemplated a shorter barrel in .45 which I could do but having taken a good look at the stock I'm not sure it could deal with the recoil of a .45. The stock is very delicate and with the back action lock my concern is that it would snap at the wrist.
 

TFoley

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IMO, it did not have a false muzzle.
I agree - it lacks the oft-seen locating pins used to attach such a device. The pattern punches are a common decorative feature of guns of this era. I'd love to see it being shot the way it was meant to be - chunk-gun shooting is not widely known outside the USA, and watching it on Youtube it looks like a real family occasion for shooting and meeting up.
 

Tanselman

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Based on details on this rifle, it was made near Louisville, KY, but could be from either side of the river. The guard has a typical Louisville style "square shoulder" on the rear spur where it runs up to meet the guard's rear extension. In addition, the guard has two flats filed on it, and slightly pointed ends, both details found on guards sold in Louisville to local gunsmiths. The exceptionally long barrel also suggests a KY-made rifle, since they loved longer barrels on that side of the river. The back-action lock came into use in Louisville and central Kentucky almost simultaneously with the start of the percussion era, and was perceived as a superior lock over the front action percussion locks by most of the better builders in Louisville. This rifle has the remnants of a rounded side facing in front of the back-action lock, suggesting it is an earlier use of the back-action lock. The gun most likely dates to the late 1830s, possibly to mid-1840s. When you get into the 1840s, the remnant of the side facing disappears on guns made in Louisville... if made outside of Louisville as this one probably was, the remnant of a side facing probably lasted a little longer, since rural areas were not as progressive as Louisville. The capbox is engraved too simply to be a Louisville product, and the comb is terminated too high off the wrist to be a Louisville gun, despite having Louisville-related parts, barrel length, etc. I think the gun most likely was made in KY near the Ohio River, but outside of Louisville where its influence was still strong, but the gunmaker didn't feel obligated to follow the "big city" pattern exactly. It could also be from southern IN or OH near the Ohio River, but that long barrel suggests it came from below the rifle, at least to me. Shelby Gallien
 

Baggy270

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As much as I appreciate being given this rifle if I had the barrel rebored to .40 I really don't know what I'd do with it. It's way to big to use for hunting and I don't see myself taking up chunk shooting. I had contemplated a shorter barrel in .45 which I could do but having taken a good look at the stock I'm not sure it could deal with the recoil of a .45. The stock is very delicate and with the back action lock my concern is that it would snap at the wrist.
Okay I gotta ask! What is chunk hunting.....

Dave
 

andy52

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Okay I gotta ask! What is chunk hunting.....

Dave
Chunk shooting is a type of competition normally done with long barreled small caliber guns. It's generally done from the prone over a log or "chunk" of wood.
 

Treestalker

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Based on details on this rifle, it was made near Louisville, KY, but could be from either side of the river. The guard has a typical Louisville style "square shoulder" on the rear spur where it runs up to meet the guard's rear extension. In addition, the guard has two flats filed on it, and slightly pointed ends, both details found on guards sold in Louisville to local gunsmiths. The exceptionally long barrel also suggests a KY-made rifle, since they loved longer barrels on that side of the river. The back-action lock came into use in Louisville and central Kentucky almost simultaneously with the start of the percussion era, and was perceived as a superior lock over the front action percussion locks by most of the better builders in Louisville. This rifle has the remnants of a rounded side facing in front of the back-action lock, suggesting it is an earlier use of the back-action lock. The gun most likely dates to the late 1830s, possibly to mid-1840s. When you get into the 1840s, the remnant of the side facing disappears on guns made in Louisville... if made outside of Louisville as this one probably was, the remnant of a side facing probably lasted a little longer, since rural areas were not as progressive as Louisville. The capbox is engraved too simply to be a Louisville product, and the comb is terminated too high off the wrist to be a Louisville gun, despite having Louisville-related parts, barrel length, etc. I think the gun most likely was made in KY near the Ohio River, but outside of Louisville where its influence was still strong, but the gunmaker didn't feel obligated to follow the "big city" pattern exactly. It could also be from southern IN or OH near the Ohio River, but that long barrel suggests it came from below the rifle, at least to me. Shelby Gallien
Thank you, Shelby, for the good opinion/insight. I once knew a man who had inherited a .32 half-stock caplock (front-action), 32" barrel, 7/8-15/16" atf, stocked in cherry with brass furniture and no patchbox, had been in his family since the early days time, with a history of use in Kansas. Small game gun, with that same bold comb as on the OP's rifle. I believe his (OP's) rifle is definitely a target gun, probably used in 'chunk' or 'meat' shoots. I once held a fullstock flint rifle with a heavy 50 cal. barrel 1 inch atf, 42-44" long stocked in fine curly maple with brass furniture and patchbox, no carving or engraving, just a working man's gun, about late 1700's, a dealer from Illinois had. It had probably been freshed out a few times. It bore the name of a Pennsylvania maker, maybe Schroyer. I tried to imagine a man packing that thing around. Point being, sometimes a man bought what he could afford or was available, used it for everything from squirrels to hogs and deer, to competition. If only they could talk, as the saying goes, but sometimes they do, a little. Thanks again for your knowledge, George.
 

TFoley

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Chunk shooting is a type of competition normally done with long barreled small caliber guns. It's generally done from the prone over a log or "chunk" of wood.
Yup, we got that.

But what is 'chunk hunting'? See post #29.
 

andy52

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Yup, we got that.

But what is 'chunk hunting'? See post #29.
I'm not sure the person who posted that even knew what chunk shooting is.... ;).
The hunting of chunks will have to be defined by someone other then me...:dunno:
 

Tn poor boy

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Id like to have this old gun fo chunk shooting if you consider passing it down some one
 

andy52

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Considering the gun was given to me by a friend it would rather rude of me to pass it along while I'm still on the green side of the dirt.... ;)
 
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Lets see chunk hunting---- first thing is ya gotta find a place in the woods where there has been logging activities, there is usually a few chunks hangin around there, once the chunk is found ya gotta put the sneak on em very carefully as they blend in with the woods pretty well, once in shootin range take careful aim and schoot em, now a chunk aint hard to clean I would recommend just remove the bark, tote the chunk home, if ya got a long hike ahead I would recommend harvesting a small chunk, put in a kettle of water and boil, boil, boil, once ya think the chunk is done take it out of the water and give the chunk a toss they be tough on the teeth. The broth aint worth much either.
 

andy52

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Lets see chunk hunting---- first thing is ya gotta find a place in the woods where there has been logging activities, there is usually a few chunks hangin around there, once the chunk is found ya gotta put the sneak on em very carefully as they blend in with the woods pretty well, once in shootin range take careful aim and schoot em, now a chunk aint hard to clean I would recommend just remove the bark, tote the chunk home, if ya got a long hike ahead I would recommend harvesting a small chunk, put in a kettle of water and boil, boil, boil, once ya think the chunk is done take it out of the water and give the chunk a toss they be tough on the teeth. The broth aint worth much either.
That would be kinda' like stick Bass which I've caught many of but I've yet to find a recipe that makes them eatable.....:)
 

Tn poor boy

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Lets see chunk hunting---- first thing is ya gotta find a place in the woods where there has been logging activities, there is usually a few chunks hangin around there, once the chunk is found ya gotta put the sneak on em very carefully as they blend in with the woods pretty well, once in shootin range take careful aim and schoot em, now a chunk aint hard to clean I would recommend just remove the bark, tote the chunk home, if ya got a long hike ahead I would recommend harvesting a small chunk, put in a kettle of water and boil, boil, boil, once ya think the chunk is done take it out of the water and give the chunk a toss they be tough on the teeth. The broth aint worth much either.
Unless you are a termite lol
 

hawkeye2

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As much as I appreciate being given this rifle if I had the barrel rebored to .40 I really don't know what I'd do with it. It's way to big to use for hunting and I don't see myself taking up chunk shooting. I had contemplated a shorter barrel in .45 which I could do but having taken a good look at the stock I'm not sure it could deal with the recoil of a .45. The stock is very delicate and with the back action lock my concern is that it would snap at the wrist.
I spent a good portion of my life up in Maine and guns with back action locks were very common, specially smoothbores. I have a number including 3 made in Augusta and can see no issues with a back action lock significantly weakening a stock with average usage. Now if you were going to beat a black bear or moose to death I might expect it to break but I'm getting too old to hunt that way. You mentioned the stock being delicate and that may be the limiting factor but again I wouldn't worry about the lock inlet so much. Have you considered having it lined to a smaller caliber?
 
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