Using Tallow

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Andrewmtnman

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Not sure about the leather piece but I was told by a reliable source that there can be enough salt in deer tallow to rust up a gun barrel. He also stated that the longer you "cook" it the more salt is boiled out. I still have been using in my ML and have found no issues
 
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Not sure about the leather piece but I was told by a reliable source that there can be enough salt in deer tallow to rust up a gun barrel. He also stated that the longer you "cook" it the more salt is boiled out. I still have been using in my ML and have found
I know they say animal fat is pretty much a perfect source of nutrients. So it only seems to make sense that it would have plenty of salt and other minerals in it. I was just curious. Thanks for the reply
 
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Isn't salt added to bacon as part of the process of making bacon? In other words, it is not naturally salty?
Yes. Unfortunately a lot of it has phosphates and a lot of unnecessary stuff added to it. That's a good point though. Processed meats, such as bacon, have a lot of stuff added to it. At least the commercial stuff does.
 

Mousegunguy

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I just dressed two lambs last week, like I do every year. I always render the fat to make tallow with it. Then it gets made into candles or gets mixed with beeswax to make lube.
I’ve cooked with it occasionally and don’t taste any salt at all.
Maybe my taste buds just don’t pick it out?
 

Tom A Hawk

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Mutton tallow is great greasy stuff. I have been using it for patch lube for several years. When I first got into muzzle loading back in the 70's there were not so many commercial options for lube other than the Thompson Center grease, the smell of which always reminded me of finger paints in kindergarten. My maternal grandfather was a great source of historical information on muzzle loaders as that's what he used in his youth. I asked one time about what grease did they use in the old days. He said, "mutton tallow".
 
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What if you filter the bacon grease (warm) through a cloth. Would some salts remain?
Walk
Yes. The salts impregnated the meat and fat.
Today the meat is quick cured and has to remain refrigerated. Old bacon was dry salted then fluid poured off and resalted then fluid poured off again. This went on for several days. After the bacon was smoked and then let hang for several weeks.
In both cases meat and fat was saturated with salt.
Not as heavy in quick cured, you can go from packaging to frying pan. Old bacon had to be soaked in water before frying or it was too salty to eat
Just taste a little of the fat and you can taste the salt
Lard, or tallow fat goes in a cooker raw. As it melts the melted portion is skimmed off leaving pure fat. In the bottom the collagen is left that gave structure to the fat on the animal
 
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I've been using bacon grease that I render and strain. I mix it with old candles and a little olive oil. Its greasy, tacky, and doesn't run when its hot outside. I use it on the arbors of my cap n ball revolvers to grease the cylinder. Works pretty well and smells like bacon when its fired!
 
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