Using Nessler Balls?

Discussion in 'Smoothbore' started by Stantheman86, May 13, 2019.

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  1. May 22, 2019 #21

    Stantheman86

    Stantheman86

    Stantheman86

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    I was just going to try making an 1861 Pattern cartridge for these since I don't quite have the skills to make Pritchett type stuff.

    It would seem the original intent would have been to use these like a Minie ball and load just the bullet, and have them "bump up" from the charge.

    But they are awfully loose in the bore. I'm just going to leave them in the paper and see what happens.
     
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  2. May 22, 2019 #22

    DaveC

    DaveC

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    OK! Yes, I got one of the limited run moulds from you! Mighty glad I did!

    Good to know about the 80 grains. At some point, I may have to build a frame and put it way out like in the French tests cited above... As you say: 110 grains with .64 or .65 undersized ball, and 70 grains--give or take--with the huge whopper 730 grain MiniƩ/Burton... So what is the charge for the NC tar heel "Nessler?" It'll take some doing and experimentation. I suspect that it may get a bit greater range out of the smoothbore...
     
  3. May 24, 2019 #23

    gemmer

    gemmer

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    I've been curious about the Eras Got By Nessler since I read about it on the N-SSA bulletin board. His website notes that it casts .680 which seems way too small to me, but he doesn't say anything about paper patching it. It also seems to me that patching a compression style bullet properly would be rather difficult, plus, I'm not sure what would happen to the patch when compression takes place. I'm anxious to read about results of test shootings?
     
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  4. May 25, 2019 #24

    Eras Gone

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    Gemmer, there is so much that is unknown about this bullet. I dont think there are any surviving bullets to tell us how they were loaded or the original intent. I just copied the bullet as it was historically. I'm also looking forward to seeing the paper patch results.
     
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  5. May 25, 2019 #25

    yulzari

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    The Austro Hungarian Lorenz used a compression bullet and was used in a paper cartridge in the French manner like the Enfield cartridge.
    lz.jpeg
    lz1.jpeg
     
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  6. May 26, 2019 #26

    Stantheman86

    Stantheman86

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    If this is a copy of a CSA bullet, it makes sense that they would attempt a similar cartridge for the Nessler to the Pritchett cartridge for the Enfield
     
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  7. May 27, 2019 #27

    DaveC

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    The bullets themselves turn up on battlefields. They are often identified as "shotgun slugs" used in the very many double guns that were shouldered and carried to war. Nonetheless, it appears that these were manufactured on imported machinery in Raleigh North Carolina for use in smoothbore .69 caliber arms, of which there were many in seceding states. The Eras Gone By mould produces a dead-ringer for the "Type II" variant. The cartridges were apparently manufactured in the State Institute for the deaf, dumb, and blind. No one has produced a cartridge yet, so of course there is some speculation as to how the cartridge was constructed. As yulzari has demonstrated, bullet base down cartridges were relatively common in French, Austro-Hungarian, and British usage... U.S. Model 1855 cartridges were a bit complex, what with three pieces of paper of different sizes, like the British Enfield cartridge, but with the bullet faced forward. By 1861, U.S. cartridges were two identical paper tubes, one holding the bullet and forming the exterior sleeve, the second forming the powder cylinder behind the bullet. By 1863, the cartridge was simplified further by eliminating thread or string to tie off the front.

    At war's outset, there were a number of cartridge styles in use in the South, but over time a marked preference for Enfield types emerged in the secessionist CSA states.

    I just fired a bunch of smoothbore .670 Alox-lubed round balls through my original Model 1842, and it gets seriously difficult to load past the fouling after a dozen or so shots! The issue round ball was .643" or .65 of course, not .67. I'm thinking that if the NC "Nessler" seals the windage interior to the bore with its skirt, it might scrape it clean. The paper patch, if used, might have helped with sealing the bore and assisted with fouling too. Certainly it will be higher velocity too. I'll have to make more bullets and get out to test these back to back with the round ball. I figure it might do to make a large target frame for an "area target" and count hits like tests of yore... It would be fun to try on a large metal target too... But that might have to be at closer ranges.
     

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