Unloaded muzzleloader at the range?

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The range I shoot at has process when the range gos cold. All receivers open and a bright red plastic flag like device threaded through receiver to demonstrate an unloaded condition. As the only ML there, I have no idea what to do with the flag thing. As the RO walks the line, they just shake their heads and move on. How do you guys handle this issue. How does one show an unloaded muzzleloader at the range?
 
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The range I shoot at has process when the range gos cold. All receivers open and a bright red plastic flag like device threaded through receiver to demonstrate an unloaded condition. As the only ML there, I have no idea what to do with the flag thing. As the RO walks the line, they just shake their heads and move on. How do you guys handle this issue. How does one show an unloaded muzzleloader at the range?
Don't allow a "Cold Range" call by anyone until you have discharged your firearm.

You'll always get some guy that needs to run down range because he used a kite or a sail for a target stand and it blew over two minutes after he set it up.

Tell everyone to hold tight. In fact, demand it.
 
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I'm not sure your average RO understands muzzleloaders or related safety procedures. I could offer up examples but I'll bet some of you could too, you get it.

I will not leave a muzzleloader even partially loaded during a ceasefire and cap or prime only on the line with the muzzle pointed down range. I witnessed more than once people capping or priming before pointing down range and have cautioned the regular RO at my club to watch for this behavior especially just ahead of hunting season when the once a year muzzleloader shooters hit the range. I often wonder how many of those otherwise okay looking guns have sewer pipes for bores.

When shooting muzzleloaders at a range under officer control I explain to that person I might need more time ahead of a ceasefire to make sure my firearm is clear. If the RO wants an explanation I give it.

When using an unregulated or self managed range I let the other shooters know I'm shooting a muzzleloader and ask them to give me time before any ceasefire to clear my gun.

So far it's worked.
 
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The range I shoot at is good at calling 2 minutes till range gos cold. I get my flint lock discharged well enough, I was just wondering how to display a cold flintlock, caplock? I shoot both at this range.
I lay the caplock at half cock with no cap on the nipple. And the flintlock with frizzen open and cock fully lowered. Both pointing down range. Just wondering if you guys do something else. The RO shaking his head bugs me a little.
 

Brokennock

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The range I shoot at has process when the range gos cold. All receivers open and a bright red plastic flag like device threaded through receiver to demonstrate an unloaded condition. As the only ML there, I have no idea what to do with the flag thing. As the RO walks the line, they just shake their heads and move on. How do you guys handle this issue. How does one show an unloaded muzzleloader at the range?
Can you clamp the flag between hammer and nipple?

Buy a dowel or ramrod blank and tie an orange ribbon to one end. Drop the other end down the bore so the colored ribbon shows at the muzzle when they ask for a clear line?
 

Uncle Miltie

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Most range flags I've seen usually can't say bang but it's what we did when we used muzzleloaders on a couple modern ranges in FL. The range officers knew what's what and they didn't have to take heat for allowing folks to not comply with the range rule.
 

Loyalist Dave

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Buy a dowel or ramrod blank and tie an orange ribbon to one end. Drop the other end down the bore so the colored ribbon shows at the muzzle when they ask for a clear line?

Another option is, I've seen guys who painted the shaft of the jag blaze orange, so that if they ever had to clean in the woods or a range with high grass (for whatever reason) if they dropped it before they attached the jag..., they could find it. Simply screw it onto the rammer, invert it and insert it into the barrel with the jag left out, and you have a florescent marker in the barrel.

Illustration, not the actual jag as written about :
ROD AND SAFETY JAG.JPG




LD
 

ord sgt

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I am a RSO and a black powder enthusiast. When shooting, if there is a call for "cease fire", I inform the RSO about the status of my rifle or pistol. If fully loaded, they allow me time to get the shot off. Otherwise, I refer to the state Game & Wildlife rule for muzzleloaders. An uncapped or unprimed pan of M/L is considered "unloaded". It is then safe for transport after a day's hunt.
This is applied to the range too. The rifle is left in the upright position, safe from falling down while at the loading bench on the firing line. All personnel stand clear of all benches during cease fire while people are down range.
 

new2bp

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Range rules are usually one size fits most

For my revolver I remove cylinder. For inline shotgun I crack action open (converted single shot) For my rifle, half cock and uncapped and if possible an empty barrel


But nonstandard stuff can be confusing

"All bolts must be open" But this is an open bolt MAC10, bolt closed is safe
 

TFoley

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My rifle is stood vertical at the side of the shooting bench, held there in the same clamp-on device that holds it while I'm loading, and with the range-rod in the muzzle. Revolvers get the ramrod lever inserted in the chamber and a flag in the muzzle. Single shot pistols get the flag in the muzzle. All percussion arms are visibly uncapped - the one guy with his flintlock does the same as a percussion arm with the range rod, but adds a flag between the cock and frizzen.

Here in UK the NRA runs a separate RCO course for black powderists - we recommend that ALL our RCOs take it.
 

Loyalist Dave

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I would either tie the flag around the end of the muzzle or place it between the hammer and frizzen/nipple. I don't like the idea of putting anything in the bore that could be a projectile.
AH but the reason for a "chamber flag" is to show at a distance there is nothing in the barrel. Using a ramrod that is bottomed on the breech, does the same thing, and the orange part on the protruding jag makes it easier and simpler for a person at a distance to visually confirm the same situation as a chamber flag, Not fool proof by any means but much more of a true indicator than a piece of cloth at the muzzle or between the hammer and frizzen or nipple, which doesn't actually verify the barrel is empty.

LD
 

Mrg5

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Luckily, the one club I shoot at has a fair number of black powder shooters and usually I’m not the only one with a flintlock. Most of the RO’s shoot muzzleloaders themselves and are aware of what it takes to clear our rifles. They will usually give a two minute warning before calling cease fire. Once cease fire is called they ask if any muzzleloaders still have a “hot one” and if so they allow you to discharge it before allowing anyone down range.

The other club I shoot at has a dedicated muzzleloader range. There aren’t very many black powder shooters who shoot regularly here and no RO unless there is an organized shoot so I often am the only one on the range or occasionally with one or two other black powder shooters at the most.
 
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