Uberti Belt Revolvers

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by mec, Feb 3, 2005.

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  1. Feb 3, 2005 #1

    mec

    mec

    mec

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    [​IMG]
    I picked up these two 2003-4 made Ubertis after I decided I needed to shift gears and try to learn something about the caplock revolvers. I already had a navy that I had completed from a run that had apparently been rejected and sold for scratch by one of the importers. It had the grip shape peculiar to Piettas but no markings of any kind. I got it working after replacing some of the brittle and ill-fitting parts that I had come to expect with Italian replicas.

    The two above clued me in that Uberti- once just the best of a bad lot, had gotten very serious about percussion revolvers. I ordered spare parts from VTI gunparts and Cimarron Arms and they actually CAME. Just as amazing, I haven't had to use any of them.

    Both have light trigger pulls and perfectly timed actions. The Remington was quickly sighted in by drifting the front sight and then filing it down for the correct elevation. The Colt Army need slight elevation and windage adjustment that I accomplished by working on the hammer/rear sight. Bench groups would suggest that this is the more accurate the two but both shoot fine enough groups that I really can't be sure.

    The Colt-type had a loose loading lever retainer. I fixed this by tightening the dovetail with a brass punch. I also had to stake in the little guide pins in the front of the frame to keep them from falling out during disassembly.

    I find that I like these johnny-come-lately designs more than I thought I would. I was kind of stuck on the earlier designs because they got to go through more history than these- the Army came out in 1860 and the Remington evolved to the current form from 60-63. Still, after they got that war out of the way, there was still plenty of civilian history to be made with these. There were still Bison on the plains and the trans-continental rail road was still a few years away. The Remington stayed in production until 1875 and the Colt was popular enough that JW. Hardin had one on him when the rangers caught up to him in 1879.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Feb 3, 2005 #2

    RussB

    RussB

    RussB

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    Mec....In all honesty, which of the two would you say you prefer for "point-ability", and accuracy, using the best load in both.

    Russ
     
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  3. Feb 3, 2005 #3

    mec

    mec

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    My irrational choice is the 1860-just because. The sights (after I widened the notch) are still a bit less visible than the Remingtons but still work very well. The "pointability" is the strong point that a lot of people cite when they call the 1860 their favorite revolver. Nevertheless, the Navy is pretty pointable too and if you haven't been gunwriter educated, you might find it actually preferable. I'd call it a toss-up as far as sweeping it up and hitting the target.

    The remington gets low points for gumming up with fouling but the truth is, both of them get pretty gummy with black powder and not so much so with pyrodex or other subs. Gumming up doesn't become an issue if you take them apart and clean them every cylinder full or two.

    I have often picked the 1860 when I wanted to dazzle myself with shooting success and the Remington when I wanted an easy clean up. Here lately, I've had some very accurate sessions with the Remington. With my cleaning method-which doesn't require full disassembly, the Remington is a bit easier. After taking out the cylinder, all I have to do is take off the grips and the trigger guard. With the Army, I have to remove both halves of the grip frame and the mainspring. Not much difference when you get right down to it.
    I still prefer the Army but wouldn't argue with somebody who prefered the Remington.
     
  4. Feb 3, 2005 #4

    RussB

    RussB

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    "I still prefer the Army but wouldn't argue with somebody who prefered the Remington".

    I'm glad you said that. I'm not quite sure why, "I'm glad you said that", but none the less I am.

    It is my opinion that most people who pick up these guns, will at least "think" they can shoot the Colt better. This does not always prove to be the case, but the Colt does possess that certain feel. Perhaps it is as you described...."just because".

    Russ
     
  5. Feb 3, 2005 #5

    mec

    mec

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    "I'm glad you said that. I'm not quite sure why, "I'm glad you said that", but none the less I am."

    That has the same ring to it as my comments about my preference for the army. We appear to have landed on the exact same wavelength.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2005 #6

    RussB

    RussB

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    Ya know, I really liked the picture of the Remington you posted the other day. The engraving seemed very "tastful".

    I say that, but yet...you could put everything I know about engraving in your eye, and never blink....but I still like engraving.

    Of course I also liked the Colt, and the Dragoon too. Heck, I just like guns I guess. However, there are some guns I like better than others. I just haven't sorted those details out, yet.

    I have never seen a Revolver that was "To Fancy"!
    I have never seen a Revolver that was "Ugly"!
    And, I have never seen a Revolver but what I didn't kinda wish it was mine.

    Russ
     
  7. Feb 3, 2005 #7

    mec

    mec

    mec

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    A local guy did that. The late Harry Claire. This was the first gun he engraved and believe it or not, he actually got better. Here's a Single Action Army he did. In the background is a Bowie knife and sheath he did as a companion to the remington. By that time he had learned to interwine his scrollwork very well.
    http://gallery.sixshootercommunity.com/displayimage.php?album=search&cat=0&pos=0

    Move the mouse finger around until you can click it up to full size.
     
  8. Feb 3, 2005 #8

    Rebel

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    I think the most hip shootable if you will gun made is the 1851 Navy followed closely by the '60 Army and '61 Navy. The Remingtons just don't have that FEEL. Nothing wrong with a Remington. In fact if i had to stake my life on one that's what i would go with. But for just plain 'ol fun shooting, you can't beat the Colts.
     
  9. Feb 3, 2005 #9

    mec

    mec

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    I seldom do hip shooting- results too humiliating. I did rip one off at a gallon jug with the Remington the other day and hit it. Stopped while ahead.
     
  10. Feb 3, 2005 #10

    Rebel

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    Maybe i should have used the term INSTINCTIVE Shooting instead of hip shooting, although with enough practice you would be surprised how well you can shoot from the hip.
     

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