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Uberti 1862 Pocket Police

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Clukmyrooster

32 Cal
Joined
May 16, 2024
Messages
6
Reaction score
7
Location
Houston, Texas
Hello all tinkerers and craftsmen and what-have-ye's, I come bearing a multitude of questions regarding my latest impulse buy. Usually with my impulse buys I know what I'm getting into, this is not one of those occasions. So to start off, I had bid on what was listed as a functional 1851 Navy replica, but this non-functional 1862 Pocket Police (manu.1983) showed up instead. I did a bunch of research and reading to find out what I had actually been sent and if parts were available to fix it myself, and during that research I had figured I'd already spent too much effort into learning about it that it just wouldn't be worth sending it back. So I decided to keep it, it didn't hurt that the gun grew on me in that short period, it's a gorgeous piece.

So I disassembled it to diagnose what the problem was, and was able to learn the internal mechanisms and going-on's pretty well. The mainspring was cracked, the hand assembly spring was loose from its little housing crevice, and the flatspring broke while I was fiddling with the action a few days after I got it. I ordered some replacement parts from Taylor's and Co. to work on the revolver myself, only to find that Taylor's current production Uberti parts are apparently made to an oh-so slightly different spec than my 1983 manufactured Uberti. Emails exchanged between me and Taylor's also confirmed these differences in spec being because my particular revolver was made 41 years ago.

The mainspring required some dremel/filing work to actually fit underneath the hammer roller properly, and still provides what feels like more tension than it requires, but I don't know the gun well enough to confirm and since my sample size of 1 isn't good enough to not be biased I may be wrong but it could probably use just a little more filed off.

The cylinder locking bolt was not necessarily broken, but I figured I'd get a spare in case I needed it in the future, the actual locking nug is a bit too fat to squeeze into the cylinder notch, and quite flatter than the original. the two arms are also more flexed outwards, I'm not sure if that's by design or what. In the pictures you can see the difference in flex. And the original locking bolt, has a small bit on the end of the face that is more filed down whereas the replacement is squared off. But would I need to hand file down the locking nug to fit perfectly to my cylinder myself? Or did I get a lemon? The original is on the left, the new one from Taylor's is on the right.

Lockingbolt2.jpg
Lockingbolt7.jpg



The hand assembly and hand spring that came in the gun when I bought it are functional albeit the spring had come loose from its housing along the backside of the hand. I just slid it back in, and the hand now turns the cylinder again. I know this is a wear part and will likely need to be replaced at some point, so I got a replacement too. But the replacement hand assembly and spring are slightly different spec dimensions than the original, the spring is not as hook shaped, and is quite a bit longer. And the hand itself is a bit more narrow than the original.
Would I need to fit/file this spring down myself? What would be the best way of doing that without ruining the spring, or the temper?

Hand1.jpg
Hand2.jpg
Hand3.jpg
Hand4.jpg



Now for the flatspring, the replacement flatspring looks and seems quite different than the original. I was able to get it into the gun without altering it at all, and it is functional. However, while I had the broken original next to the replacement, the replacement spring seems to jut way further up into the internals, providing way more tension on all the other parts than the original was.
Now, when I put the hammer in half-cock, it will either lock the cylinder completely like it's in full cock, or inconsistently let loose the cylinder like it's supposed to in half cock. I'm assuming that this is being cause by the flatspring providing too much tension to the other internals? In the following pictures, the obviously broken flatspring on the left is the original, and the other on the right is the replacement from Taylor's.


Flatspring1.jpg
Flatspring2.jpg
Flatspring3.jpg
Flatspring6.jpg



If there are any questions I can answer to make helping me any easier I'd be more than happy to oblige, I know I'm probably not using the right words or terminology to sufficiently explain myself. Thanks in advance
 
Hello all tinkerers and craftsmen and what-have-ye's, I come bearing a multitude of questions regarding my latest impulse buy. Usually with my impulse buys I know what I'm getting into, this is not one of those occasions. So to start off, I had bid on what was listed as a functional 1851 Navy replica, but this non-functional 1862 Pocket Police (manu.1983) showed up instead. I did a bunch of research and reading to find out what I had actually been sent and if parts were available to fix it myself, and during that research I had figured I'd already spent too much effort into learning about it that it just wouldn't be worth sending it back. So I decided to keep it, it didn't hurt that the gun grew on me in that short period, it's a gorgeous piece.

So I disassembled it to diagnose what the problem was, and was able to learn the internal mechanisms and going-on's pretty well. The mainspring was cracked, the hand assembly spring was loose from its little housing crevice, and the flatspring broke while I was fiddling with the action a few days after I got it. I ordered some replacement parts from Taylor's and Co. to work on the revolver myself, only to find that Taylor's current production Uberti parts are apparently made to an oh-so slightly different spec than my 1983 manufactured Uberti. Emails exchanged between me and Taylor's also confirmed these differences in spec being because my particular revolver was made 41 years ago.

The mainspring required some dremel/filing work to actually fit underneath the hammer roller properly, and still provides what feels like more tension than it requires, but I don't know the gun well enough to confirm and since my sample size of 1 isn't good enough to not be biased I may be wrong but it could probably use just a little more filed off.

The cylinder locking bolt was not necessarily broken, but I figured I'd get a spare in case I needed it in the future, the actual locking nug is a bit too fat to squeeze into the cylinder notch, and quite flatter than the original. the two arms are also more flexed outwards, I'm not sure if that's by design or what. In the pictures you can see the difference in flex. And the original locking bolt, has a small bit on the end of the face that is more filed down whereas the replacement is squared off. But would I need to hand file down the locking nug to fit perfectly to my cylinder myself? Or did I get a lemon? The original is on the left, the new one from Taylor's is on the right.

View attachment 320372View attachment 320373


The hand assembly and hand spring that came in the gun when I bought it are functional albeit the spring had come loose from its housing along the backside of the hand. I just slid it back in, and the hand now turns the cylinder again. I know this is a wear part and will likely need to be replaced at some point, so I got a replacement too. But the replacement hand assembly and spring are slightly different spec dimensions than the original, the spring is not as hook shaped, and is quite a bit longer. And the hand itself is a bit more narrow than the original.
Would I need to fit/file this spring down myself? What would be the best way of doing that without ruining the spring, or the temper?

View attachment 320360View attachment 320361View attachment 320362View attachment 320363


Now for the flatspring, the replacement flatspring looks and seems quite different than the original. I was able to get it into the gun without altering it at all, and it is functional. However, while I had the broken original next to the replacement, the replacement spring seems to jut way further up into the internals, providing way more tension on all the other parts than the original was.
Now, when I put the hammer in half-cock, it will either lock the cylinder completely like it's in full cock, or inconsistently let loose the cylinder like it's supposed to in half cock. I'm assuming that this is being cause by the flatspring providing too much tension to the other internals? In the following pictures, the obviously broken flatspring on the left is the original, and the other on the right is the replacement from Taylor's.


View attachment 320354View attachment 320355View attachment 320356View attachment 320359


If there are any questions I can answer to make helping me any easier I'd be more than happy to oblige, I know I'm probably not using the right words or terminology to sufficiently explain myself. Thanks in advance
Sample size of 1.... You're essentially a subject matter expert now..... Welcome, now I shall currently and in the future rely on your input for ALL of my 41 year old revolver questions ... Lol
I like your thoroughness.
 
As anyone will tell you, proper bits, fitment (with patience) and lots of 'try it' is the name of the game for most if not all BP revolvers (even new in the box ones). There nore than a few resources out there on the web and yobetubo also Rumble. Start with VTI Gunparts, Possible Shop, Jedidiah Smith and others are sources for parts if you are looking for replacements. Oh and don't forget Brownells for tools.
 
As anyone will tell you, proper bits, fitment (with patience) and lots of 'try it' is the name of the game for most if not all BP revolvers (even new in the box ones). There nore than a few resources out there on the web and yobetubo also Rumble. Start with VTI Gunparts, Possible Shop, Jedidiah Smith and others are sources for parts if you are looking for replacements. Oh and don't forget Brownells for tools.
From what I have read in the past weeks, I figured this was going to be the case. I figured I would make a post and confirm that first before I go fine tool trigger-happy and mess something up though. I'll start by trying to hand file and fit the new hand assembly/spring myself, and also buy some slix shot nipples from slix spring to avoid cap-sucking that apparently plagues these 1862 Pockets, and a good nipple wrench from Trackofthewolf. Then I'll do some more research on how to mess with and fit the new flatspring.
Thank you kindly for your wisdom, I will definitely be checking out VTI and the others you mentioned.
 
Keep in mind that most replacements are oversized to allow for fitting.
I will keep this in mind going forward thank you, Taylor's offered to return the parts I ordered. But I don't think it will be necessary, I'll do my best to hand fit these parts myself, and if I run into trouble I can always source parts elsewhere.
 
Hello all tinkerers and craftsmen and what-have-ye's, I come bearing a multitude of questions regarding my latest impulse buy. Usually with my impulse buys I know what I'm getting into, this is not one of those occasions. So to start off, I had bid on what was listed as a functional 1851 Navy replica, but this non-functional 1862 Pocket Police (manu.1983) showed up instead. I did a bunch of research and reading to find out what I had actually been sent and if parts were available to fix it myself, and during that research I had figured I'd already spent too much effort into learning about it that it just wouldn't be worth sending it back. So I decided to keep it, it didn't hurt that the gun grew on me in that short period, it's a gorgeous piece.

So I disassembled it to diagnose what the problem was, and was able to learn the internal mechanisms and going-on's pretty well. The mainspring was cracked, the hand assembly spring was loose from its little housing crevice, and the flatspring broke while I was fiddling with the action a few days after I got it. I ordered some replacement parts from Taylor's and Co. to work on the revolver myself, only to find that Taylor's current production Uberti parts are apparently made to an oh-so slightly different spec than my 1983 manufactured Uberti. Emails exchanged between me and Taylor's also confirmed these differences in spec being because my particular revolver was made 41 years ago.

The mainspring required some dremel/filing work to actually fit underneath the hammer roller properly, and still provides what feels like more tension than it requires, but I don't know the gun well enough to confirm and since my sample size of 1 isn't good enough to not be biased I may be wrong but it could probably use just a little more filed off.

The cylinder locking bolt was not necessarily broken, but I figured I'd get a spare in case I needed it in the future, the actual locking nug is a bit too fat to squeeze into the cylinder notch, and quite flatter than the original. the two arms are also more flexed outwards, I'm not sure if that's by design or what. In the pictures you can see the difference in flex. And the original locking bolt, has a small bit on the end of the face that is more filed down whereas the replacement is squared off. But would I need to hand file down the locking nug to fit perfectly to my cylinder myself? Or did I get a lemon? The original is on the left, the new one from Taylor's is on the right.

View attachment 320372View attachment 320373


The hand assembly and hand spring that came in the gun when I bought it are functional albeit the spring had come loose from its housing along the backside of the hand. I just slid it back in, and the hand now turns the cylinder again. I know this is a wear part and will likely need to be replaced at some point, so I got a replacement too. But the replacement hand assembly and spring are slightly different spec dimensions than the original, the spring is not as hook shaped, and is quite a bit longer. And the hand itself is a bit more narrow than the original.
Would I need to fit/file this spring down myself? What would be the best way of doing that without ruining the spring, or the temper?

View attachment 320360View attachment 320361View attachment 320362View attachment 320363


Now for the flatspring, the replacement flatspring looks and seems quite different than the original. I was able to get it into the gun without altering it at all, and it is functional. However, while I had the broken original next to the replacement, the replacement spring seems to jut way further up into the internals, providing way more tension on all the other parts than the original was.
Now, when I put the hammer in half-cock, it will either lock the cylinder completely like it's in full cock, or inconsistently let loose the cylinder like it's supposed to in half cock. I'm assuming that this is being cause by the flatspring providing too much tension to the other internals? In the following pictures, the obviously broken flatspring on the left is the original, and the other on the right is the replacement from Taylor's.


View attachment 320354View attachment 320355View attachment 320356View attachment 320359


If there are any questions I can answer to make helping me any easier I'd be more than happy to oblige, I know I'm probably not using the right words or terminology to sufficiently explain myself. Thanks in advance

Clukmyrooster In the end you will succeed & know how to deal with most revolver function issues down the road.
 
I’ve been buying and shooting replica percussion revolvers for the past 57 years and over the course of that time have replaced many parts in them. As they get older and older, new made parts today just don’t fit easily and need to be altered to fit. I use Arkansas stones, and an assortment of files - mill bastard, diamond and Swiss files - to fit what are often oversized parts into the older guns. Just take your time and don’t rush modifying parts and you’ll be successful.
 

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