Uberti 1847 Colt Walker Reproduction and holster/belt rig

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Rat

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Ha. The Josey Wales would have just said: "are you gonna pull them pistols, or whistle Dixie?"
 

PluggedNickel

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some very nice looking revolvers!
Thank you sir. I was going for the Josey Wales look with the holster. Mine is a cross draw, but the color, texture, design is similar. His has a square buckle, but I like the one on mine better.

 

perrotterik

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Not to mention the guy wearing it, I bet the people in the 1850's would end up with a double hernia from laughing at anyone carrying a Walker around in a holster like that.

To begin with, holsters like that weren't popular before 1865 and the Walker was made to be carried in saddle holsters, not worn on the hip. :confused:
So you laugh at Josey Wales? He carried 2 of them in a double rig. Revolvers like that were luxury weapons at that time when cut throats thrived. Being armed at all times is never a joke. You sir are ill informed.
 

perrotterik

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Thanks. The Walker is heavy, but I don't find it too bad to hold out, I'm 6' and 195 pounds. I figure if the actress that played Mattie, could handle that "Colt Dragoon," misnamed by Marshal Rooster Cogburn, since it was in fact a Walker she held, I can do OK with it. I tuned up the action so the trigger pull is 2-2.5 pounds, action is very smooth now. It should be a hoot to shoot. My wife got me this revolver for our anniversary. I have had it for several months. I didn't want to shoot it till I slicked up the action and shimmed the arbor. I've had that done for more than a month, but my wife took sick with a lingering migraine that put here down for about 10 days. And, I have been busy with chores and the Golden Retriever.
I hope to shoot it soon. Heck, I've shot SASS in sub-zero weather before, so I should be OK on the back deck for some shooting.
I've been collecting BP revolvers, and I have an 1861 Springfield, for at least 10 years now. Planned on getting into shooting them when I retired, which I have.
Here are some pictues of them:

I am 5-11 7/8 and weigh 210 pounds of solid martial arts muscle. I can shoot mines all day with no trouble at all. It shouldn’t even be a question for you. Wth? Black powder pistols that weigh 4.5 pounds? Recoil is minimal. I just joined the forum and am not impressed with the level of knowledge and common sense so far. I am not directing this comment specifically at you sir, although your comment falls in line. I am just saying in general. I am hoping it gets better. I want to hear opinions of those that are shooters, not keyboard talkers.
 

perrotterik

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Thanks. The Walker is heavy, but I don't find it too bad to hold out, I'm 6' and 195 pounds. I figure if the actress that played Mattie, could handle that "Colt Dragoon," misnamed by Marshal Rooster Cogburn, since it was in fact a Walker she held, I can do OK with it. I tuned up the action so the trigger pull is 2-2.5 pounds, action is very smooth now. It should be a hoot to shoot. My wife got me this revolver for our anniversary. I have had it for several months. I didn't want to shoot it till I slicked up the action and shimmed the arbor. I've had that done for more than a month, but my wife took sick with a lingering migraine that put here down for about 10 days. And, I have been busy with chores and the Golden Retriever.
I hope to shoot it soon. Heck, I've shot SASS in sub-zero weather before, so I should be OK on the back deck for some shooting.
I've been collecting BP revolvers, and I have an 1861 Springfield, for at least 10 years now. Planned on getting into shooting them when I retired, which I have.
Here are some pictues of them:

Do you like bacon? If so use bacon grease instead of that pussiefied bore bitter. Bacon grease and black powder just smells do’s delicious. Now get to the chuck wagon and make me a bacon and eggs sandwich. Did I mention that I am almost 6 feet tall and hungry? Get on it tenderfoot!
 

sourdough

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I am 5-11 7/8 and weigh 210 pounds of solid martial arts muscle. I can shoot mines all day with no trouble at all. It shouldn’t even be a question for you. Wth? Black powder pistols that weigh 4.5 pounds? Recoil is minimal. I just joined the forum and am not impressed with the level of knowledge and common sense so far. I am not directing this comment specifically at you sir, although your comment falls in line. I am just saying in general. I am hoping it gets better. I want to hear opinions of those that are shooters, not keyboard talkers.
Well, well... I guess I should be impressed with your physique, sir! Ummm… not. Also not impressed with your debut with a total of four posts introducing yourself.

Here are a few basic facts for you.

Ignoring the 1847 Walker weighing in at 4 lbs. 9 oz (which Colt never manufactured after the first 1100 guns), we shall concentrate upon the subsequent Colt revolvers (disregarding the 1848/1849 Pocket Model .31, and the 1862 Pocket Police/Pocket Navy .36). The reference point here is circa 1860 by Sam Colt. The 1848 Dragoon .44 [all 4 models: Whitneyville Hartford (which used up leftover Walker frames and grip assemblies), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Models] OMA (Old Model Army) holster pistol; the 1851 Navy .36 OMN (Old Model Navy) belt pistol; the 1860 Army .44 NMA (New Model Army) belt pistol; and the 1861 Navy .36 NMN (New Model Navy) belt pistol.

Colt had a difficult time getting any Army contracts for the OMA guns until the ACW was looming. The Army (1858-1860) ordered many OMA 3rd Model 4-screw cut for shoulder stock guns, and are shown on US Treasury records as holster pistols, meaning they were meant for cavalry or mounted infantry use carried in a holster on the saddle pommel. The Army also ordered many OMN guns from 1855-1860 because they were belt pistols. One has to realize that the stature of an average man in 1860 was much smaller than an average man in the 21st century. I don't know if you ever humped a load as a military member, but weight is a prime consideration.

I have several 1851/1860/Dragoon revolvers and shoot them all. I love my WH Dragoon for the report it makes, but it is a chunk to carry around. I much prefer the 1860 .44 for weight, as well as the 1851 Navy .36 for being more handy.

Just three of mine.

ASM 1860 Army .44 full-fluted cylinder
Uberti 1848 WH Dragoon .44
Pietta 1851 Navy .36 2nd Model Belt Dragoon (fantasy parts gun)



Go ahead, prove your macho, and haul around the Walker.

Better yet, post a vid of you shooting it. Hope you have a leather thong to keep the load lever from dropping on every shot. If not, that may be a bit embarrassing for a big man.

Regards,

Jim
 

Buff

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I'm begging, please use some other service than Photobucket! Or, purge the old photos on your account. It's so frustrating to see these blurry pictures with the Photobucket watermark!
 

SDSmlf

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I am 5-11 7/8 and weigh 210 pounds of solid martial arts muscle. I can shoot mines all day with no trouble at all. It shouldn’t even be a question for you. Wth? Black powder pistols that weigh 4.5 pounds? Recoil is minimal. I just joined the forum and am not impressed with the level of knowledge and common sense so far. I am not directing this comment specifically at you sir, although your comment falls in line. I am just saying in general. I am hoping it gets better. I want to hear opinions of those that are shooters, not keyboard talkers.
Ok, your BMI (28.26) says you are over weight and on your way to being obese. How can we assist with your cry for help?

As far as black powder pistols, curious as to what pistols you have that you shoot Minies out of all day with no trouble? Very impressive. What powder charges are you using in your 4.5 pound pistols when shooting these Minies? And what weight Minies do you shoot? Assume you are shooting 45 caliber pistols? What manufacturer’s 4.5 pound model pistol are your shooting? Always love to learn from real world experts.

Please go on.
 
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Stantheman86

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I just made a rig for my Uberti 1st Model Dragoon , those "Double Cylinder Pouches " that are $25 on Ebay are quite literally just downsized musket cartridge boxes, even with a double flap. They make great revolver cartridge boxes.

I used a Boston Leather "Explorer" belt since it's close enough to an 1860s era roller buckle gun belt and I got an old repro Dragoon holster that sits on the left hip , butt forward. A cheapie made in Pakistan cap pouch holds two tins of #11 caps although I may replace this with a LePierre revolver cap pouch.
 

Russ T Frizzen

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Quote: And that classic line "By God girl, that's a Colt Dragoon!" Reuben J. "Rooster" Cogburn. Rooster mis-identified the Colt Walker, but hey, close enough. ;)[/QUOTE] Rooster really wasn't wrong: the Walker IS a Dragoon revolver. The first one ever. Russ
 

Zonie

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So you laugh at Josey Wales? He carried 2 of them in a double rig. Revolvers like that were luxury weapons at that time when cut throats thrived. Being armed at all times is never a joke. You sir are ill informed.
Of course you realize, "The Outlaw,Josey Wales" is fiction?
Basing ones assumptions on Hollywood movies can lead one to totally incorrect "facts" that are totally incorrect.

You say, writing about another members comments,
"I just joined the forum and am not impressed with the level of knowledge and common sense so far. I am not directing this comment specifically at you sir, although your comment falls in line. I am just saying in general. I am hoping it gets better. I want to hear opinions of those that are shooters, not keyboard talkers."

This implies that your level of knowledge is large. I do hope it is. I am always looking for more information about history and shooting muzzleloading and cap & ball guns so please educate us. :)
 

sourdough

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Of course you realize, "The Outlaw Josey Wales" is fiction?
Basing one's assumptions on Hollywood movies can lead one to totally incorrect "facts" that are totally incorrect.
Say it ain't so! Why, just the other day I was watching "Seraphim Falls" and Liam Neeson was using an 1851 Navy .36 with a brass frame. It has to be a historical revolver because it was in the movie! The screenwriters of the "Hell On Wheels" series show Anson Mount brandishing what they figured was a Grizzled & Gunderson because his character was a Confederate ex-soldier and figured that they were good to go. I mean, how much different can a G&G .36 be compared to an 1860 Army .44 brass frame revolver to the audience?

If Clint carried those guns as Josey Wales, you can bet that it was just for the short screen shots.
 
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