twine

Discussion in 'Camp and Trail Gear' started by old ugly, Apr 13, 2019 at 10:32 PM.

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  1. Apr 13, 2019 at 10:32 PM #1

    old ugly

    old ugly

    old ugly

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    I have mostly used 1/4'' sisal rope for tying my shelter together but it is overkill and bulky, I tried sisal garden twine but it was too weak.
    I stood and stared at twine at home depot to try to figure what would appear correct and what would be strong enough to hold my tarp shelter together, finally gave up and thought I better ask you folks, what do you use?
     
  2. Apr 13, 2019 at 10:44 PM #2

    tenngun

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    Hemp twine sold in the craft section at wall mart. Some ml supply houses sell hemp rope in 1/4inch size.
    I do take three stands of wal mart twine hook them over a door knobs and braid them.
     
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  3. Apr 13, 2019 at 11:10 PM #3

    Carbon 6

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    Baler twine, take it and 2 ply reverse wrap it. Makes a nice small diameter strong rope. takes a while to twist though.
    You can do the same with store bought craft twine.

    Baler twine makes really good rope if you have a rope maker. A guy in our club had a rope maker and would make rope for everyone.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019 at 11:33 PM
  4. Apr 13, 2019 at 11:22 PM #4

    Coot

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    I use 1/4" hemp rope on our marque poles/stakes. Stronger & soft on the hand as opposed to sisal or manila. Turkeyfoot Traders sells a variety of hemp rope, canvas, straps and in your case, hemp trine in various sizes, several at over 100# test.
     
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  5. Apr 14, 2019 at 12:02 AM #5

    old ugly

    old ugly

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    i never even thought of walymart or a craft store. cool.
    when you mention twisting a few strands together, do you think tying a few strands together and anchoring one end, then use the drill to twist it, maybe it would be quick way to twist them?
     
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  6. Apr 14, 2019 at 12:30 AM #6

    Nyckname

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    Drill powered rope making machine,


    Twisting by hand,


    There's a faster way to do it manually by rolling the strands against your thigh, but I can't seem to find a video.
     
  7. Apr 15, 2019 at 1:16 AM #7

    old ugly

    old ugly

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    I was just about to head over to Walmart, I was staring at the pile of sisal rope and thought maybe I can unravel some to make twine, reverse the process. it doesn't like being unwound but it did and it is still pretty strong. we will see if it holds up to a tarp in a wind .

    ou
    tom
     
  8. Apr 15, 2019 at 1:30 AM #8

    Carbon 6

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  9. Apr 15, 2019 at 2:01 AM #9

    Tom A Hawk

    Tom A Hawk

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    I've made cordage with dogbane, milkweed, basswood bark, hickory bark and sinew, The problem with two ply is the splices. Depending on the fiber used, the fibers may be rather short making it necessary for splices to be close together. Each splice is therefore supported by only a single adjacent strand. If strength is required, three ply cordage allows for a staggering of the splices such that each splice is supported by two strong adjacent strands.

    This is a three strand dogbane cord for a fire bow
    upload_2019-4-14_20-52-44.png

    For your primitive camps and lean-to's I suggest tying with strips of hickory bark. It worked well for tying the timbers of Haudenosaunee long houses.
     
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