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Gooba Jones

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Thank you kindly. Wish I had some kind of official documentation. But I guess for theories their really is no documentation historically.

Gooba Jones Sr.
 

tenngun

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Thyroid. Well almost, if he woulda lived a bit longer I rekon.
DISCLAMER: sorry for going off topic.
View attachment 32139
Heres Linclon in 1860. Notice the exposed neck in earlier portraits like the one above.
View attachment 32140

In this portrate 1865, his collar and neck tie is covering his neck.
Along with many other health theories, thyroid cancer is said to could have been a silent killer of Abe. If he would have lived longer.

The covering of the neck are thought of a way to cover is swollen thyroid gland.

Tenngun, whats your take on Linclon possibly having thyroid cancer? As you being a nurse.

Respectfully,
Gooba Jones Sr.
It’s hard to say on past people. Many have come up with all sorts of diagnosis for him. It could have just been a goiter.
 

Gooba Jones

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It’s hard to say on past people. Many have come up with all sorts of diagnosis for him. It could have just been a goiter.
Interesting, ill have to research. Have also heard he (maybe couldhave) had somthing called Marphan syndrome, do know if Marphan affects the thyroid tho. Some facial marks and exceptional height for the era are suspect.

Gooba Jones Sr.
 

tenngun

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Interesting, ill have to research. Have also heard he (maybe couldhave) had somthing called Marphan syndrome, do know if Marphan affects the thyroid tho. Some facial marks and exceptional height for the era are suspect.

Gooba Jones Sr.
Maybe, he looked like it, but sans test it’s impossible to tell. It makes for great reading but diagnosis based on symptom and photographs can only be a maybe.
Hypoglycemia looks just like a stroke. Bone cancer has to go on a long time before it stops looking like arthritis. G I cancer and ulcers look a lot alike.
Being president is a tough job, war time worse. It takes a horrible toll on the men who have held the office. And lots of folks died in their fifties at that time.
The south would have been better off had Lincoln not been murdered, but looking at how he aged in four years I don’t know if he could have survived
 

ppg1949

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This is in response to statement Carbon 6 made on this thread back in early March just as my state was shutting down. I had mentioned that in reading the Jeff'n Davis book "The Rise and Fall of the Confederacy", Davis had mentioned after Lincoln's assassination, "that it would be bad for the CSA because Lincoln had no malice toward the southern people". Carbon 6 had ask me for the reference page because he could not find my reference in that book. I was not able to answer C6 because I had done my usual routine of donating my WBTS books to our local library and the library was closed until the governor reopened our state. But I purchased another copy and after laborious and tedious reading, I found I was in error. I know it's hard to believe but I erred. It seems that it was John C. Breckinridge that made the statement to Davis after receiving the telegram notifying them of Lincoln's assassination. Breckinridge regretted it very much and stated "it was very unfortunate for the people of the South at that time". Davis replied "that if it were to be done at all, it were better that it was done well". Meaning the assassination of Andy Johnson and Sec' Seward. Now the above being stated, I'm sure I read somewhere that Davis made a statement to the affect that "it would have been better (if Lincoln had lived) because he had no malice toward the southern people". I know the mind is a terrible thing, especially when your old, but I doubt I have the capacity to make that up. So if anyone chances across it, jump in with the correction. In the mean time I'll still be searching for the book I presume I read it in. Thanks to all for enduring this interlude.
 

Carbon 6

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"The Confederate army had a more formal dental system than the Union army. In addition to using civilian dentists to care for the soldiers, they had a dental corps, picked from the dentists available in the South. Dental surgeons were assigned to staffs or hospitals and combat regiments as medical surgeons.'"
I think i'd dig a little deeper into that, you are comparing it to modern day dentistry.
 

Carbon 6

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The name of the man that killed Lincoln was Booth not South.
Blaming the south for killing Lincoln is on par with blaming Muslims for 9-11, the Irish for a bombing done by the IRA , Italians for the Mafia.
The north created the conditions then ran and blamed the south for not fixing a problem the south didn’t have.
Come on Tenn, that a poor attempt at a defense. I know you can do better.
 

Carbon 6

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Interesting, ill have to research. Have also heard he (maybe couldhave) had somthing called Marphan syndrome, do know if Marphan affects the thyroid tho. Some facial marks and exceptional height for the era are suspect.

Gooba Jones Sr.
I do not think Lincoln was a Marphan. Just my opinion.
 

Carbon 6

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This is in response to statement Carbon 6 made on this thread back in early March just as my state was shutting down. I had mentioned that in reading the Jeff'n Davis book "The Rise and Fall of the Confederacy", Davis had mentioned after Lincoln's assassination, "that it would be bad for the CSA because Lincoln had no malice toward the southern people". Carbon 6 had ask me for the reference page because he could not find my reference in that book. I was not able to answer C6 because I had done my usual routine of donating my WBTS books to our local library and the library was closed until the governor reopened our state. But I purchased another copy and after laborious and tedious reading, I found I was in error. I know it's hard to believe but I erred. It seems that it was John C. Breckinridge that made the statement to Davis after receiving the telegram notifying them of Lincoln's assassination. Breckinridge regretted it very much and stated "it was very unfortunate for the people of the South at that time". Davis replied "that if it were to be done at all, it were better that it was done well". Meaning the assassination of Andy Johnson and Sec' Seward. Now the above being stated, I'm sure I read somewhere that Davis made a statement to the affect that "it would have been better (if Lincoln had lived) because he had no malice toward the southern people". I know the mind is a terrible thing, especially when your old, but I doubt I have the capacity to make that up. So if anyone chances across it, jump in with the correction. In the mean time I'll still be searching for the book I presume I read it in. Thanks to all for enduring this interlude.
It was not necessary, as that ship had long since sailed, but I do commend you for the follow up. It takes a man of character to admit his error. :thumb:
 

tenngun

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I do not think Lincoln was a Marphan. Just my opinion.
He was tall and lanky but physically very tough. Rather famous for his wrestling ability.
Marphan effects the bodies connective tissue. Ligaments, tendons and joints. Cardio vascular system Is also effected. Most of the time people are tall and thin,very flexible but tend to be fragile and have some activity intolerance.
Lincoln remained very physically active till his death.
Moral toughness and just plain guts have nothing to do with physical limitations, but Lincoln didn’t seem to be physically limited either.
 

tenngun

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Come on Tenn, that a poor attempt at a defense. I know you can do better.
No, people don’t get group guilt. Booth was Booth, not the south.
We have no way of knowing what the majority of the southerners population thought of Booth ‘s acts. Even if they applauded, which I think few did, One man shot one shot at Lincoln, one man, who had guts and a brain, conspired with a band of alcohol addled half wits Ina pipe dream to make him self a hero.
He may have even seen it as his destiny as his father was Marcus Junius.
Marcus Junius killed the last king of Rome, Marcus Junius Killed Caesar, And the son of Marcus Junius would kill a man the south saw as tyrannical. Talk about omens.
 

tenngun

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I think i'd dig a little deeper into that, you are comparing it to modern day dentistry.
This was the time when Dentist had become doctors. No longer was dentistry in the hands of barbers. They were much closer in science to a todays dentist then the ‘Waterloo teeth”salesman from thirty years before.
 

Carbon 6

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No, people don’t get group guilt. Booth was Booth, not the south.
We have no way of knowing what the majority of the southerners population thought of Booth ‘s acts. Even if they applauded, which I think few did, One man shot one shot at Lincoln, one man, who had guts and a brain, conspired with a band of alcohol addled half wits Ina pipe dream to make him self a hero.
He may have even seen it as his destiny as his father was Marcus Junius.
Marcus Junius killed the last king of Rome, Marcus Junius Killed Caesar, And the son of Marcus Junius would kill a man the south saw as tyrannical. Talk about omens.
Perhaps you are right, or not.

“They’ve shot Abe Lincoln,” one jubilant Massachusetts Copperhead shouted to his horrified Yankee neighbors when he heard the news. “He’s dead and I’m glad he’s dead.”

Many Southerners who reviled the Northern president held their tongues—because they feared they would be blamed for his murder. “A kind of horror seized my husband when he realized the truth of the reports that reached us of this tragedy,” recalled the wife of Clement C. Clay, who represented Alabama in the Confederate States Senate and, late in the war, directed Rebel secret agents from a posting in Canada. “God help us,” Senator Clay exclaimed. “I[t] is the worst blow that yet has been struck at the South.” Not long afterward, Union officials arrested Clay on suspicions that he had conspired in Lincoln’s assassination and threw him into prison for more than a year.
 
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Seems that any original A&E History Channel "Civil War Journal" cannot be viewed on you tube.
Copyright issues or PC? Man, that was a great series.
History channel is a shadow of its former self.

SM
 

Carbon 6

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This was the time when Dentist had become doctors. No longer was dentistry in the hands of barbers. They were much closer in science to a todays dentist then the ‘Waterloo teeth”salesman from thirty years before.
Most of the dentists in the North and South during the Civil War, who did not have a formal education, learned through apprenticeship with an established dentist. Formally trained dentists in both parts of the country graduated from Northern dental schools.

When comparing the number of dentists in 1860, the Confederate states had the same proportion of dentists to population as the Union-0.2 dentists per 1,000 people.' This equal access to dentists suggests roughly the same quality and quantity of dental care, because practitioners in both areas underwent the same educational process. Since one would expect the same quality of dental care in civilian dentistry in the North and South, there is reason to believe that the quality of dental care in the military would be the same. The only difference would be in the accessibility of filling materials. The demand for dental care in both militaries was great. The Union army lacked a formal dental corps, so they hired civilian contract dentists to perform emergency dental care extractions, lancing gums, etc. The lack of a military dental corps placed demands on local dentists who filled the void. Besides those contract dentists, there were many dentists who had enlisted in state regiments and performed dentistry unofficially. Some of these men became line officers or hospital stewards. It was also quite common for military surgeons, assistant surgeons and stewards to practice dentistry, common enough for dental instruments to be included as a part of field kits.

The Confederate army had a more formal dental system than the Union army. In addition to using civilian dentists to care for the soldiers, they had a dental corps, picked from the dentists available in the South. Dental surgeons were assigned to staffs or hospitals and combat regiments as medical surgeons.' The primary function of Southern military dentists was to examine teeth in hospitals where soldiers were being treated. Some soldiers were able to have teeth cleaned, filled and extracted by dentists who used their own instruments.
 
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