The War Between The States Discussions

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tenngun

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I think it had a little more to do with the Victorian age. Good day sir replaced joy of the day as a greeting. Life was a struggle to better oneself not to be enjoyed.
Cartoons and many paintings of the eighteenth century show laughter and happiness. The Farmer smiles while leaning on his scyth, the baker smiles at his window over his rolls.
The only time we see laughter in cartoons and paintings in the times around the the war was on ‘low lives’ Irish and other drunks’.
By looking serious they demonstrated proper deportment
 

ppg1949

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The Grimké sisters were a head of there time. A few hundred years before they would have been burned as witches for their ideas on equally. Radical women of the upper order. Carbon 6, thanks for sharing.
 

ugly old guy

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In a discussion about old photos from the Civil War era and why you hardly ever see any smiles. Medicine was primitive but so was dentistry. Alot of the participants back then may very well had bad teeth, missing teeth or no teeth. Bad teeth at an early age, Nothing to smile about.
I thought it was ill-mannered to smile except at a wedding or wedding reception?
 

Eutycus

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I thought it was ill-mannered to smile except at a wedding or wedding reception?
It very well could have been ill mannered of society as a whole, I don't know. This was just a theory or guess, Everyone couldn't have had bad teeth. Staring for a time at a camera without smiling was probably easier to do than smiling. I can't say for sure as I've never tried it. Instead of say ''cheese" it was "freeze" back then.
 

Eutycus

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US Grant was having a portrait done in a photography studio. I forget the ocassion Grant had just made Lt.General or the War was over. Anyway as Grant was posing, the skylight behind him caved in and came crashing down. Grant never flinched or even moved like everyone else in the studio. I'm paraphrasing but the photographer said Grant had ".nerves of steel".
 

Eutycus

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Actually the photographer was none other than Matthew Brady. It was his assistant Stanton who broke the skylight when he was uncovering it. Large shards of glass showered all around Grant. Grant did look up but immediately looked back at the camera. And the actual words by Brady were "The most remarkable display of nerve I ever witnessed".
 

Eutycus

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159 years ago on Feb. 18th Jefferson Davis was sworn in as Provisional President of the Confederate States. He was selected for this job and elected on November 1861. Do any followers of history know who the photographer might be and just where did he set his camera up?20200218_082943.jpg
 

Eutycus

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Some one stated that this day (18th) was especially selected because it had special meaning. I'm thinking that someone got it mixed up with Jefferson Davis' second inauguration on Feb. 22, 1862 after he was elected as president.The 22nd being Washington's birthday. He was looked upon as "one of their own" in the South.
 

Carbon 6

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It's hard to say the Davis was "elected" when he was appointed to the job and when an election was held no one ran against him.
 

ppg1949

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It's hard to say the Davis was "elected" when he was appointed to the job and when an election was held no one ran against him.
I respectfully disagree with you about the Davis election. Ours & CSA election process does not mandate a multiple choice for an elected office. In the county I live in, the only county office contested by the Democrats is the county sheriff. The prosecutor, county clerk, treasury & judges are elected without being contested by an opposing party but there are votes cast for them, making them elected.
 

Carbon 6

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I respectfully disagree with you about the Davis election. Ours & CSA election process does not mandate a multiple choice for an elected office. In the county I live in, the only county office contested by the Democrats is the county sheriff. The prosecutor, county clerk, treasury & judges are elected without being contested by an opposing party but there are votes cast for them, making them elected.
Ok, I'll give you that, but try to secede and elect someone other than the person who was duly elected in your county.

Elected or not, Davis was still illegitimate. Lincoln was the real president.
 

ppg1949

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I like your answer because it is correct that Lincoln was the elected president of the whole united nation. The South participated in that election, although Lincoln received less votes from the "Solid South" than in the North. The South leaving the Union reminds me of a professor I had in psych 101. He started his first lecture with a question. The question being "Does anyone ever make a bad decision at the very instant it is made?".
 

tenngun

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It's hard to say the Davis was "elected" when he was appointed to the job and when an election was held no one ran against him.
Was there not a meeting of the confederate Congress that made Davis President?
I’m thinking that governments that set up revolutionary governments often chose a leader for a civilian government via popular choice in that body.... democratically elected even if the electorate was small. And other governments that had small electorates but have an elected leader... the Pope, emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, the kings of Saxon England ect.
France, USSR, Republican England, even the United States during the war years.
Evan the post revolution there was an election of sorts. All of the leaders of post Stalin USSR or today’s China came to power via election by high party officials.
Washington even was petty much appointed time his postion. His electorate was pretty small percentage of the population of tge states at the time.
 

Carbon 6

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All of the leaders of post Stalin USSR or today’s China came to power via election by high party officials.
That is a good comparison (parallel) to the Confederacy. Both China and and Stalin killed and enslaved large numbers of their population to facilitate their totalitarian regimes.
 

tenngun

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:ghostly:Well comparing a society that kept slaves to a murdering society like Stalin’s or Moa’s makes sense. And for sure we wouldn’t say that about Lincoln. Just ask the Sioux of Minnesota how well they were treated compared to Stalins treatment of soviet minorities:D.
 
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