The War Between The States Discussions

Discussion in 'Civil War' started by Zonie, Jul 19, 2019.

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  1. Jan 17, 2020 #3661

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

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    I like that. You may very well have found what Taylor was talking about. I should have thought of a friction devise. As a kid in the 50's and 60's we had friction sparkler toys.
     
  2. Jan 17, 2020 #3662

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

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    Lincoln was painted into a corner so to speak. Both sides did what they thought they had to do.
     
  3. Jan 17, 2020 #3663

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

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    Still trying to figure out how it worked. By "Caps" do they mean percussion caps?
     
  4. Jan 17, 2020 #3664

    ppg1949

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    I think the "caps" were probably more like small formed pieces of sulphur or amorce. It looks like the small pieces were set in the hole. Then the handle pushed a couple to to get a spark setting the sulphur on fire. Rather ingenious.
     
  5. Jan 17, 2020 #3665

    Carbon 6

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    I believe the caps where on a roll like toy cap gun caps and were ignited by friction insted of percussion, but there were percussion lighters as well.

    I think something like that fits, "Brisquet" is French and so were many of the lighter designs. It makes sense.
     
  6. Jan 17, 2020 #3666

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

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    Makes the most sense. I've read of some flintlock lighters that were basically a small flintlock pistol sans a barrel. The one you pictured seems the most practical of the early designs.
     
  7. Jan 17, 2020 #3667

    Carbon 6

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    Called "tinder lighters"
    upload_2020-1-17_13-30-57.jpeg


    Percussion Lighter: Made by an unknown manufacturer in France ca. 1850. Percussion lighter using amorce-caps and a percussion mechanism underneath the barrel. Form of a duel pistol with container for a clay pipe. The fusee is missing. Marked: Patented in France.

    upload_2020-1-17_13-32-48.jpeg



    If you like old lighters, you'll like this web site.
    http://www.vintagelighterbook.com/html/pre-flint_lighters.html
     
  8. Jan 17, 2020 #3668

    ppg1949

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    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020
  9. Jan 17, 2020 #3669

    ppg1949

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    So we need to thank Genl. Taylor for bringing to our attention that people of the mid 1800's did not depend on matches or flint and steel to have fire. Interesting.
     
  10. Jan 17, 2020 #3670

    Carbon 6

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    Don't forget the burning lens and the pneumatic piston.
     
  11. Jan 17, 2020 #3671

    ppg1949

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    Forgot about those. Archimedes is probably rolling over in his grave right now. The pneumatic piston may have been the Briquet, since he said "I struck fire on my Briquet". I guess we will never know for sure. It is amusing to speculate though.
     
  12. Jan 18, 2020 #3672

    Carbon 6

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    Here is a picture of the one in the link I posted.

    Called a Pyrogène.


    upload_2020-1-17_19-22-20.jpeg

    "Pyrogène: Made by an unknown manufacturer (marked CBG) in France ca. 1850. A practical pneumatic air compression lighter (piston) using tinder, comprising a small container for the latter. Fully marked lighter, showing a burning torch symbol, CBG, Pyrogène and a marking of a French patent. Extraordinary! "
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2020
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  13. Jan 18, 2020 #3673

    ppg1949

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    There are several modern manufacturers of compression pistons today. Mostly for survivalist or minimalist. Some are quite ornate of exotic woods. But the Pyrogene appears to be metal.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2020
  14. Jan 18, 2020 #3674

    ppg1949

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    Eutycus, your in the Southland, have you ever heard an old timer refer to a briquet?
     
  15. Jan 18, 2020 #3675

    Eutycus

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    No can't say that I have. My grandpa and uncles all used kitchen matches.I actually thought you were referring to a charcoal briquette or an ember possibly.
     
  16. Jan 18, 2020 #3676

    Carbon 6

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    I've not had much success making those, darn that Henry Ford.:rolleyes:
     
  17. Jan 18, 2020 #3677

    ppg1949

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    yup, uncle Henry was a shrewd business man in more was than one.
     
  18. Jan 18, 2020 #3678

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

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    Eutycus, funny you mention briquettes. My first search for briquet turned up briquettes. Apparently a briquet and briquettes are both charcoal. But a further definition also revealed briquet as archaic english for a lighter. Those danged archaics, who gave them the authority to change definitions and make up words, lol.
     
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  19. Jan 18, 2020 #3679

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

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    It would not surprise if teamsters or quartermasters may have carried embers to start a quick fire in their wagons in metal pails.. The iceman Otzi had some charcoal wrapped in damp leaves but no fire making instruments. It seems that most soldier's camps at night had fires unless they were forbidden.Taylor stated his personal slave Tom could make a fire quickly even in damp weather. Unless there was an abundance of Birch wood maybe Tom carried some fire with him in smoldering charcoal.
     
  20. Jan 18, 2020 #3680

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

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    Does anyone remember the movie "The Great Locomotive Chase" ? I think was based on a true story like the movie "The Raid".
     
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