The War Between The States Discussions

Discussion in 'Civil War' started by Zonie, Jul 19, 2019.

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum by donating:

  1. Jan 13, 2020 at 5:26 AM #3621

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2018
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    714
    Location:
    South Texas
    I've heard that about the body armor. A big thing was made about it at the time as it hinted that the soldiers who used it were "cowardly". And it turns out some of the Southern troops also used it. But from what I've read it didn't work too well. Not on rifle bullets and shrapnel anyway. There was a Texas Colonel (Rogers, I think) on who's dead body was found some armor after the battle of Cornith. But this is the first I'm hearing of the Yankee cavalry being strapped onto the horses. But it does sound "believable".
     
  2. Jan 13, 2020 at 2:43 PM #3622

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    W. Central Indiana
    Taylor said the Union cavalry was from New England and didn’t have much experience riding. This was one area that the Confederacy had an advantage for several years.
     
    Eutycus likes this.
  3. Jan 13, 2020 at 5:30 PM #3623

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2018
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    714
    Location:
    South Texas
    Yeah, the Southern cavalry rode circles around the northern troops, literally. You've heard of Stuart's ride around McClellan (twice) ? I can imagine their western counterparts were shocked by Forrest or Wheeler and their cavalrys also. They used shotguns and six shooters, heck with sabers.
     
  4. Jan 13, 2020 at 5:41 PM #3624

    Juice Jaws

    Juice Jaws

    Juice Jaws

    54 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2006
    Messages:
    1,692
    Likes Received:
    628
    Location:
    Near Yosemite Park
    Yea but in the end didn't do them any good
     
  5. Jan 13, 2020 at 5:50 PM #3625

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2018
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    714
    Location:
    South Texas
    True , they did wind up on the losing side but it took 4 years for the North to drive that point home.
     
  6. Jan 14, 2020 at 12:20 AM #3626

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    W. Central Indiana
    By the end of the war the Federal cavalry was much improved. Everything I've read about the Southern cavalry being so much better than Northern cavalry was the South was a nation where riding horseback was an every day occurrence. In the North, with large metropolitan areas, riding a horse from point A to B was not a necessity. On the flip side the both sides had to get their infantry use to marching long distances. There were early exceptions to this, i.e. Jackson's "foot cavalry" and the Louisiana Tigers. The thing that surprises me the most were the number of stragglers on both sides.
     
    Eutycus likes this.
  7. Jan 14, 2020 at 4:44 AM #3627

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2018
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    714
    Location:
    South Texas
    I've heard thats where alot of officers used their swords the most.Prodding stragglers across the shoulder blades with the flat of their sword.
     
  8. Jan 14, 2020 at 4:54 AM #3628

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    69 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    3,654
    Likes Received:
    1,432
    Sloooooow learners. :rolleyes:
     
    Juice Jaws likes this.
  9. Jan 14, 2020 at 5:51 PM #3629

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    W. Central Indiana
    I've read that also. One officer, I can't think of his name, used the point of his sword on their butts. I think that would get you moving very quick.
     
  10. Jan 15, 2020 at 1:27 AM #3630

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2018
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    714
    Location:
    South Texas
    I would almost think that would give you the right to self defense. If a person came at you with the point of a sword, couldn't you say you that feared for your life and shoot him dead?
     
  11. Jan 15, 2020 at 2:18 AM #3631

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    W. Central Indiana
    I would think shooting an officer would get you a court martial comprised of his fellow officers. Not a good scenario to be in, lol. I keep thinking it was Wade Hampton but that doesn't sound quite right. Oh well, to many books and not enough memory.
     
  12. Jan 15, 2020 at 3:12 AM #3632

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2018
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    714
    Location:
    South Texas
    Not saying your wrong but that doesn't sound like something Wade Hampton would do.
     
  13. Jan 15, 2020 at 5:26 AM #3633

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    W. Central Indiana
    I agree with you. Trying to remember who it was, Hampton just seems to pop up in my mind. It could because I just read something about him. It was several books ago, so I'm not even sure which book it was in. I do remember the officer was a CSA general and was in a really bad mood. It may have been Ewell but that is a guess. And it occured during one of the Virginia battles. Like I said I've read to many books and not enough memory.
    Do you have any recollection who it may be?
     
    Eutycus likes this.
  14. Jan 15, 2020 at 7:31 PM #3634

    GomezMunoz1951

    GomezMunoz1951

    GomezMunoz1951

    Pilgrim

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    34
    In the Battle of Gettysburg, Brigadier General Lewis Addison Armistead's brigade arrived the evening of July 2, 1863. Armistead was mortally wounded the next day while leading his brigade towards the center of the Union line in Pickett's Charge. Armistead led his brigade from the front, waving his hat from the tip of his saber, and reached the stone wall at the "Angle", which served as the charge's objective.
     
  15. Jan 15, 2020 at 8:25 PM #3635

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2018
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    714
    Location:
    South Texas
    True Story. You will notice this depiction on several paintings or pictures of Pickett's charge. He must have had a sharp sword, I read where his hat was down around the hilt of the sword by the time he neared the rock wall of cemetary ridge.
     
  16. Jan 15, 2020 at 8:33 PM #3636

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2018
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    714
    Location:
    South Texas
    This probably isn't the officer you had in mind but it reminds me of a story about Stonewall Jackson and Jubal Early. Jackson was riding in the rear of Early's Column and noticed a large amount of stragglers. He had his staff write a note to Early's headquarters that night asking why so many stragglers were seen in the rear. Early had his staff write back that so many were seen because Jackson was in the rear where they could be seen. Not many officers could get by with an impertinent note like that. Jackson was not known for his sense of humor.
     
  17. Jan 15, 2020 at 8:37 PM #3637

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2018
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    714
    Location:
    South Texas
    Also Jackson wrote to a North Carolina regiment just before Chancellorsville for regimental officers to march in the rear with fixed bayonets to prevent straggling.
     
  18. Jan 15, 2020 at 9:22 PM #3638

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    W. Central Indiana

    For so reason it seems like it happened under Jackson's command. And like you said Jackson did not have much of a sense of humor. He probably put more officers under arrest than any other CSA general. When it comes to the sword pricks, it for sure was not Lee. I also don't think it was Longstreet, either of the Johnsons, Beauregard or Pickett. It's doubtful I'll run across it again but if I do I'll list it here. Funny thing about Armistead, when I tried to google "pricking stagglers with a sword" he came up.
     
    Eutycus likes this.
  19. Jan 15, 2020 at 9:38 PM #3639

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2018
    Messages:
    2,034
    Likes Received:
    714
    Location:
    South Texas
    I still haven't found out just which officer you had in mind. I'll continue searching, one of us will find it. I was surprised how often A.P. Hill's name came up while searching under stragglers . But that's probably because He was shot by one. Yankee's had theirs too.
     
  20. Jan 15, 2020 at 9:47 PM #3640

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    W. Central Indiana
    Both sides had them. I would like to think it was because these men were worn out from the marching but some of the stragglers were just common looters.
     

Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page



arrow_white