The Rifle Shoppe

Discussion in 'Vendors and Manufacturers' started by rickystl, Dec 22, 2018.

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  1. Dec 22, 2018 #1

    rickystl

    rickystl

    rickystl

    58 Cal. MLF Supporter

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    Just a heads-up for those interested. Just received a lock kit from TRS. Only took about 3/4 weeks. But they mentioned that ASSEMBLED locks are currently running a year for delivery !! JFYI

    I often wish their was a Listing of some sort as to who can assemble, repair, make parts for locks - and is actually looking for business. LOL I use two different people currently, and they are really good and always busy. So the turn-around time can sometimes be a bit longer than you wish. But I also realize the combination locksmith/blacksmith is not around every corner. LOL And I do so appreciate their talent and skill level.

    Rick 001 (Medium).JPG
     
  2. Jan 18, 2019 #2

    Alice1885

    Alice1885

    Alice1885

    32 Cal

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    Hello, I was wondering how accurate their castings are compared to the original parts ???
    Reason I am asking is they have some Ballard Rifle castings that I need for a rifle, but I was told by several folks that the castings are way undersize....just wanting to know what your opinion is ???
    Thanks so much, Rob
     
  3. Jan 18, 2019 #3

    Robby

    Robby

    Robby

    62 Cal.

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    I have no experience with the Ballard but I have bought castings from them a few times. All of them were taken from original parts and wax cast, even the engraving will show up. As such, they will be a bit undersize. How much? I don't know, for my purpose it wasn't that important. Call them and ask, and if you decide to go with them, make sure they are in stock or you may have a loooooong wait. Morning seems to be the best time to call and you may have to keep trying because she's constantly going into the stock room and checking for other callers. They have their own way of doing things, but are very nice people and I have never been disappointed. Just make sure the parts are in stock. Good luck!!!!
    Robby
     
  4. Jan 18, 2019 #4

    Zonie

    Zonie

    Zonie

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    Cast steel has a shrink factor of .251 inches per foot so we have .251"/12" = .0209 inches per inch. That is the same as saying it shrinks 2.09 percent.

    Using this information a if an existing lockplate that is 6 inches long as a pattern without adding anything to the surface to make it larger, the casting will come out of the mold .126 inches shorter than the original.
     
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  5. Jan 20, 2019 #5

    Rifleman1776

    Rifleman1776

    Rifleman1776

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    That will be an interesting lock. What is it supposed to represent? Good luck with that project. It looks doable for the average tinkerer with proper instructions and a few tools.
     
  6. Jan 24, 2019 #6

    Flint62Smoothie

    Flint62Smoothie

    Flint62Smoothie

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    I too just bought a wheellock casting kit from them ... in stock and shipped right out! My last order from them, also an ‘in stock’ item, got here in only 4-days.

    I’m sure there’s still horror stories to report out there about people waiting years, but if they (TRS) are waiting on parts to be cast, well that’s just ... “it is what it is”.

    No one in their right mind would book/schedule and pay for a casting run to produce only 1 part ...
     
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  7. Jan 31, 2019 #7

    rickystl

    rickystl

    rickystl

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    I don't have TRS catalog in front of me at the moment, but I believe it's #619. 1650's Spanish Miquelet Lock. Here's the same lock that was received as Assembled I got about 3 years ago. Ordered another in kit form (too long a wait for assembled now) for a collector friend. Plan on having two identical pistols built, copied from an original dated 1660.

    Rick DSC00736 (Medium).JPG DSC00737 (Medium).JPG 004 (Medium).JPG
     
  8. Feb 1, 2019 #8

    Deep Creek Dale

    Deep Creek Dale

    Deep Creek Dale

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    Glad to see more people building these interesting guns. I have given up for the most part waiting for delivery from TRS and Blackely and started building miquelet locks from scratch. They are actually very simple, much easier to make than the flintlocks we are used to. There are no complex shapes or rotating pieces, the hardest thing to shape is the cock. But a few hours with a piece of 3/4 inch thick 0-1, a hacksaw and files and you are good. The other parts are a snap. The biggest problem I had when starting out, was realizing exactly how they work. I had several in my shop for repair from local Seminole war reenactors and local collectors and after you study the completed lock, they are very easy to duplicate. One thing the Spanish did that makes a lot of sense, the sole of the frizzen was almost always riveted or even screwed on. Your frizzen wears out, just screw on a new sole and keep shooting. Most of the springs on the ones I have worked on were much simpler in shape than these castings by the way
     
  9. Feb 3, 2019 #9

    rickystl

    rickystl

    rickystl

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    Yes, the tough part for me also was understanding how the horizontal sear works in the miquelet - and especially the snaphaunce - locks. Different than the vertical sear we are used to with the traditional French type flintlocks.
     

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