Suggest a flintlock

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I need to by a flintlock for one of my rifle building projects. I'll basically be copying a poor boy by Adam Angstat. I'm not experienced enought with flintlocks to know what to buy. The rifle will have a single trigger. The Chambers Golden Age lock is supposed to work well with single triggers. Are there other locks I should consider?
 

martin9

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The only Angstadt rifles I'm familiar with have Ketland locks. A chambers late ketland would be perfect for these. Chambers late Ketland is my favorite chambers lock I've used. I think I'm thinking about Joseph Angstadt guns, not Adam. I'll have to look him up
 

martin9

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Found him...still a Chambers Late Ketland would be best. Maybe round the tail on it if you wanted.
 

martin9

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It works great with a single trigger also
 
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Thanks for the tips. I wondered about the late Ketland lock. This is the rifle that has inspired me.


As it was built cheaply I wondered of a "store bought" lock might be more appropriate than something that might have been individually produced.

Long ago and far away I bought a plain roman nose stock from Dixie, with a barrel to go with it. I've been dragging it around all these years thinking I might get back to the project sometime. Then I saw that poor boy and said that's exactly what I need to replicate. I won't try to make it exactly like the Angstat rifle, there'll be a little bit of my interpretation of things, but it will be quite similar.
 

tenngun

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By the time southern rifles were in Vogue large numbers of locks were imported from England. The Late ketland is good. l&R Bails or their Dur Egg.
I’ve had good luck with L&R, and you can’t beat Chambers
The best lock I ever owned was an L&R late English, but I’ve never seen an original southern rifle with this detached pan style.
I put a Siler on mine, great lock, very pretty, completely wrong for the gun style, I like the gun but it mocks me ‘hey Jeffrey’ it says ‘you screwed the pooch here’ I tell it to shut up but it ignores me.
 

rich pierce

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Looking at the pictures of the original gun, I’m not sure it was originally a flintlock. It was recently made into a flintlock and they chose a cock that doesn’t really look good. But, as you’re using this Angstsadt gun just as a starting point, that is probably irrelevant. A Late Ketland will work, as would an L&R Manton. Most would prefer the Ketland.
 

dave_person

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Hi,
I agree with Rich. I don't believe that the gun was ever flint. William Aston was a lock maker during the 1840s and 1850s making percussion locks, mostly for under hammers and some military arms. Moreover, it may be Abraham Angstadt, not Adam. Chamber's late Ketland and Kibler's late English flintlock would be good choices. If you wanted to make an earlier gun inspired by Adam Angstadt you could use a more Germanic lock like a Siler or Chamber's Golden Age Siler lock.

dave
 
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Looking up the Angstat famile I can see where Abraham might be the maker, and a later pieriod lock would be appropriat on a rifle styled after his work.

There were two Adam Angstats. The first working during the Golden Age, and the poor boy's lock isn'twhat you'd expect for that pieriod. The second Adam was born into the percussion era. He might have made the poor boy as percussion using scrounged parts, starting with an Ashton flint lock and percussion hammer abd drum. The rifle then could have be converted to flint later, perhaps by a collector.

This simple project is starting to get more interesting. Thanks everyone for your comments. If there are more, let them flow..
 

Col. Batguano

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You are doing the right thing by asking questions here, and doing research. A lot of newer builders take the parts they get and install them as-is, partly because they're in a hurry to get the gun done, and partly because they don't know not to. (Like something NEVER to say to a woman; A moment on the lips, a lifetime on the hips---if you get my point.) For a great many builds, those parts need to be modified from the shapes they were when they came out of the box (rounding off the tail of a lock is one example).
 
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