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Stock finishing

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Siringo

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I recently finished a Kibler Colonial. Because of the large amount of end grain figure in the fancy(grade 2) maple stock, I used Kibler’s Aquafortis, and added a coat of Kibler’s tannic acid before heating the stock. I then sanded back the stock to achieve the desired contrast, I used Permalyn sealer on the internal surfaces(barrel channel, lock/trigger mortise, etc). Exterior Surfaces were finished with TOTW Original Oil. First few coats applied unassembled, an additional 10 coats{or so}applied with the rifle assembled. Very light rubbing with fine Scotch-Brite beween coats. Waxed when finished.
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Very nice. What type of metal finish did you use? I’ve built 3, all browned. I am thinking about using Jim’s patina finish.
 

Siringo

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I have a Kibler Colonial rifle on order and have been keeping busy while waiting by watching Jim’s tutorial videos.
In one he said he likes to finish the stock with the rifle assembled.
This seems counter intuitive to me. Is this a common practice?
How in the world would you deal with the potential of gun stock finish on Metal parts where you don’t want it? Some help understanding this would be appreciated.
Even TOW encourages inserting metal pieces just after putting on the first oil coat. They recommend doing so because wood swells and finely inletted pieces may not fit after applying the finish. I used Tried and True oil. First coat was cut with turpentine to help it soak in. After that, micro coats. This oil takes a very very long time to dry. The stock is best placed in direct sunlight to allow it to dry. I put my rifles together in a couple of days. The stocks took weeks!

I refinished a TVM and used permalyn sealer. That has driers in it and dries very fast. Plus is it very tough.
 

Spikebuck

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Q Tips dipped in acetone, then squeezed a bit so excess acetone doesn't run down the parts and onto the finish, then rubbed on the excess finish will take any finish off the metal parts. You do have to sort of "sneak" up to the edges where the wood is, so you don't harm the finish, though. It is not difficult to learn to do this at all.

Gus
This is exactly what my first gun building book by Suzanne Warren-Bicio said to do. She said that she always finished assembled as the finishes would fill in right up to any furniture making the transition between metal and wood seamless. She also used the Q-tip method with acetone VERY carefully to remove any finish that got on the metal. She certainly built gorgeous guns. Susanne Warren-Bicio
 

Artificer

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This is exactly what my first gun building book by Suzanne Warren-Bicio said to do. She said that she always finished assembled as the finishes would fill in right up to any furniture making the transition between metal and wood seamless. She also used the Q-tip method with acetone VERY carefully to remove any finish that got on the metal. She certainly built gorgeous guns. Susanne Warren-Bicio
I learned this in 1973 and it still works great today.

Gus
 

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