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Sourdough without yeast

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Dale Lilly

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I ran across a old post that said the bread done on a stick would have been just flour and water;. It would not rise. For everyone's000..0. information you can make your own sourdough starter … and bread, in the field without yeast .I have done that and here's how: {BTW it will last nearly forever} <A sourdough starter is a leavening agent that is used primarily in making sourdough bread. It is made by mixing just two ingredients, water and flour. It uses wild yeast, present all around us, to activate and ferment the dough. But that cut-and-dry definition robs the starter of all its magic and science. Indeed, the sourdough starter is a little world of its own, a story of microorganisms that live in your food and the air all around us.> Further instructions are all over the internet. This information that I quoted here is not original. I cut and pasted from one of those internet sites. Enjoy delightful sourdough bread anywhere. Polecat
 

Carbon 6

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I think time was the limiting factor with respect to bread on a stick, and even chemically leavened breads. Sourdough takes time.
Temperature is also a factor. Good luck making sourdough if the mercury falls below 60F.
 

Tallswife

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Havent tried bread on a stick. I dont add any yeast to my sourdough. Been keeping my starter alive for years now.
 

Loyalist Dave

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It uses wild yeast, present all around us, to activate and ferment the dough.
Well if it's sourdough, then it's yeast AND bacteria, and it's the lactobacilli that "sours" the dough. ;)

Unfortunately, some folks out there think that if you propagate and use wild yeast you automatically are making sourdough. 😶

Now it's common that you will get a wild yeast AND a bacteria with the flour/water/pinch-of-salt starter, so you get sourdough, but alas it isn't automatic. (There are some archaeologists who have made the mistake of assuming that time + wild yeast = sourdough, for example.) Well I've had yeast starter that soured wonderfully..., and I've had it also when it didn't go sour, even when going 2-3 days between baking, and keeping it for more than a month, when the previous starter had soured in less than a week. Oh Well....,

LD
 

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