Source for Pedersoli 1777 Revolutionairre stock?

Discussion in 'Smoothbore' started by Stantheman86, Jan 26, 2020.

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  1. Jan 26, 2020 #1

    Stantheman86

    Stantheman86

    Stantheman86

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    Apparently, the Unfired Pedersoli 1777 "Revolutionairre" Charleville I bought was stored above a fireplace , and the wood shrank. The barrel bands rattle around and there's cracking by the buttplate.

    I hope I'm using the right term , it's the model without band springs , they are screwed in.

    I would think an unfinished , "kit" stock would at least be available? Before I resort to using fabric strips as "shims".
     
  2. Jan 26, 2020 #2

    cositrike

    cositrike

    cositrike

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    I’d go with numerous coats of linseed oil, before giving up on the old stock. You may find it will expand again.
     
  3. Jan 26, 2020 #3

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

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    I'd redo the entire stock. When I first left the service, I worked part time for a gunshop, and they would regularly get milsurp rifles from Europe, that had been sitting in large depots, and were rubbed down every six months or once a year, probably with motor oil...just to keep them from rusting, etc.

    So we'd redo the stocks. We'd remove all of the metal. IF for some reason the piece had been used for parades, and they had sprayed on some sort of shiny "lacquer" coating, we'd strip that off first. THEN we'd submerge the stocks in hot water for 24 hours....especially the ugly oiled stocks. To that hot water we would add a small amount of detergent. This would pull a massive amount of oil out of the oiled stocks. After 24 hours we'd remove the now de-oiled and water soaked stocks, and rinse them. Then we'd hang them up for two days to air dry. At that point they were ready for further work.

    Dent's would be steamed out with wet terry cloth and steam-irons. Then the stock would be sanded a bit, then stained with Fiebing's brand leather dye, in a brown pretty close to what the rifle may have had when it left the factory. THEN...we'd use 4-0 steel wool, it's like steel cotton, and rub in a linseed oil or tung oil finish. The oiling and drying took a couple of weeks as it was a bunch of coats. At that point the metal was checked and it was thoroughly cleaned, the bore got a deep copper-removal-cleaning, and the rifle was reassembled. We didn't sell them as "mint" or anything close, but we did get a good price and the customers were quite happy. The stocks really looked good, even IF I say so, myself. ;)

    The point is, I am betting if you simply stripped your stock, soaked it, steamed out dents if needed, then after two days drying you sanded, stained, and applied a new finish....I think the wood would return to what was needed. If fifty year old stocks left in government depots can bounce back, the stock from over the mantle can too and probably more easily.

    You're thinking of replacing the stock anyway, so why not give it a try?

    LD
     
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  4. Jan 26, 2020 #4

    Stantheman86

    Stantheman86

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    Whew......that sounds equipment and labor intensive......maybe I'll start by stripping it and hitting it with stain and linseed oil....
     
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  5. Feb 6, 2020 #5

    FlinterNick

    FlinterNick

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    Nurmich Gun Parts has a copy of the 1777 stock by pedersoli, only $100.00, but its the type 1 pattern, so you’ll have to cut the band springs.
     
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  6. Feb 8, 2020 #6

    Gavin T Lane

    Gavin T Lane

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    I priced a stock this week for a broken stock on a pedersoli Mortimer shotgun. Flintlocks ect wanted $760 for one. They were the only company I could find that had one. The Italian firearms group said they could get me one but it would be 3-4 months to ship from Italy. It was cheaper but the fella I was dealing with won’t call me back. If I were you I’d start soaking that thing in water lol.
     
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  7. Feb 15, 2020 at 4:55 AM #7

    Stantheman86

    Stantheman86

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    Hmmmmmm mine is the band spring-less version
     
  8. Feb 15, 2020 at 4:56 AM #8

    Stantheman86

    Stantheman86

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    No way would I pay $700 for a stock for anything......I'd sooner soak it in water and use canvas under the barrel bands
     
  9. Feb 15, 2020 at 10:44 AM #9

    Redstick Lee

    Redstick Lee

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    do you have access to a "steam cabinet" ?
     
  10. Feb 16, 2020 at 5:07 AM #10

    Stantheman86

    Stantheman86

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    I have no idea what that even is, I'll probably just get the replacement stock
     
  11. Feb 16, 2020 at 1:43 PM #11

    Grenadier1758

    Grenadier1758

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    A steam cabinet or a steam box may be a bit more elaborate than you may want to make.
    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...8546E1A3C2CB200D6C098546E1A3C2CB2&FORM=VDRVRV
    There are other plans out there on the net.

    You may just want to bring it in your shower when you take a hot shower. Leave the stock in the shower stall after the shower inn the high humidity and it will be soaking up some water. Perhaps not as intense a treatment as a steam box, but more available to most of us since we are not trying to bend wood.
     
  12. Feb 16, 2020 at 4:30 PM #12

    FlinterNick

    FlinterNick

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    Getting those bands with the springs isn’t too hard.
     
  13. Feb 16, 2020 at 4:33 PM #13

    FlinterNick

    FlinterNick

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    For the most part what I’ve learned is that restock is very difficult and expensive. You need to really love the gun to want to restock it.

    For restocking a miruko, you’d spend 400-600$$.

    You could sell that gun for 900-1200 and buy a brand new musket.
     
  14. Feb 16, 2020 at 7:58 PM #14

    Stantheman86

    Stantheman86

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    I was just looking at the stock , it may be too far gone for this.....the barrel bands rattle loose on the forearm and the wood by the buttplate is chipping off, like this thing has been above a fireplace for 20 years of fires.

    The Numrich stock is 100 bucks , the only difference is my front band has the screw and not the spring. No big deal. I paid about $1000 for the musket , it's unfired , just that someone used it, apparently, as a mantle decorative piece. The $100 stock still puts me below a new musket.
     

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