Soldier's cup or can?

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Loyalist Dave

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I think the tin was applied over the copper to help prevent a type of corrosion also?
Tinning of copper or brass for the use of food is a modern thing, trying to avoid the formation of verdigris, from acidic substances being in contact with the copper or brass for a long period of time. Verdigris is toxic, and will mess with your digestive track. However, as long as you keep the copper or brass clean, there is no need for the tin. Apple butter is very acidic, as is brewing beer, and they are/were both made in untinned copper vessels.

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tenngun

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They did use lead solder too. I know where copper is safe and where it’s dangerous. But I will take a step away from 100% and use tin lined copper.
Over the past bit I’ve been thinking I need to look in to a hearing aid, I don’t think I’ll get a ear horn.:)
 

Cruzatte

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See the problem is...there is no documentation of fellows, long hunters or scouts, carrying small kettles at all..., none.

..., but a one man or a couple of blokes scouting or hunting in the woods? I've yet to see such documented.;) Maybe it's out there.... :D

LD
Probably because one two blokes going out alone like that was a sure death wish. And I'm sure Jed Smith could tell you that from personal experience if he were here to do so.
 

Loyalist Dave

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Probably because one two blokes going out alone like that was a sure death wish.
Actually Simon Kenton, Christopher Gist, and several other frontiersmen were well documented as going out solo, on foot for scouting for hostiles and such, not to mention fellows going out alone when hide hunting.

I can't remember the name, but one fellow would exit the fort after dark, and would set up a white-oak bark fire, covered in dirt. He'd then sit cross legged with this inside this legs and his single blanket around him to hold in the heat. He reported that he could have a "tolerable night" even in very frigid weather doing this, and would move just before dawn. This tactic would keep Native scouting groups from detecting him. Mark Baker mentions the fellow in one of Mark's videos.

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Straekat

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Actually Simon Kenton, Christopher Gist, and several other frontiersmen were well documented as going out solo, on foot for scouting for hostiles and such, not to mention fellows going out alone when hide hunting.

I can't remember the name, but one fellow would exit the fort after dark, and would set up a white-oak bark fire, covered in dirt. He'd then sit cross legged with this inside this legs and his single blanket around him to hold in the heat. He reported that he could have a "tolerable night" even in very frigid weather doing this, and would move just before dawn. This tactic would keep Native scouting groups from detecting him. Mark Baker mentions the fellow in one of Mark's videos.

LD
Allan Eckert tells that story in "The Frontiersman." Where he got the story from, and if it's true, is anyone's guess.
 

tenngun

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Don’t know if Si did it or not, but I’ve tried it and it works. Candles under a blanket works great too.
 

Cruzatte

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Ever hear the story of John Day? He was part of the Wilson Price Hunt party of Astorians. Supposedly an experienced woodsman and hunter, he got separated from the main party somewhere on the Snake River which forms the border between modern Oregon and Idaho. The end of the story is that all that's left of John Day is a small town, a river, and a dam, in eastern Oregon named for him.

I still say it's a dumb idea for an 18th century woodsman to strike off on his own, and expect to come home.
 

tenngun

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A man may be in the woods alone for several reasons. The area in danger of Indian attacks could be pretty narrow or pretty broad depending on the year and area. Much of the upstate New York Vermont New Hampshire and main area could be safe to travel without a lot of fear of Indian attack but still you could eat out of the woods.
Much of Appalachia or in to the ozarks was fairly safe... at times. There was a gray area between well settled and wild frontier.
 

Straekat

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I don't think he documents Christopher Gist's treks in The Frontiersman. Nor the fellow mentioned by Mr. Baker ;)

LD
Eckert's "The Frontiersman" was published in 1967, and the excerpt for "February 26, 1776" quoted directly below is extremely similar to what you attributed to another source.


"For the past seven weeks there had taken place a veritable exodus of families back to the comparative safety of the east. Already such settlements as McClelland’s, Hinkson, Leestown and Danville were abandoned. And now even Benjamin Logan was deserting his own small fort. When he arrived at Harrodsburg with his people, the only two occupied settlements left in the whole of Kentucky were Harrodsburg and Boonesboro, with a total of only one hundred three able-bodied men left to fight.
While James Harrod welcomed Logan and his group and was pleased at the added strength they lent his settlement, there was no doubt but that their very coming was weakening to the fort because of the tax on its resources to house, feed and clothe everyone. It also meant that now Simon Kenton must spend all his time at the most dangerous job there; he became hunter for the fort, going out alone to shoot game and bring it back to feed the hungry within the walls. It was no job for the fainthearted.
In the depths of night he would slip out of the fort and go to the place where he intended hunting the next day. There he would crouch for hours, waiting for daylight. On some of these nights the temperature was far below zero and, except for an ingenious method shown to him by John Yeager during that first winter they had spent together on the Kanawha, he would surely have frozen.
White oak bark had wonderful qualities; it burned almost without smoke and generated a remarkable amount of heat for a small amount of fuel. Simon would locate a white oak tree and remove strips of bark from it. These he would put into a small pile on the ground. Beside it he would dig a hole the size of his own head and in this he would criss-cross narrow strips of the bark until it was filled. Then, tossing his blanket over his head and shoulders so the sparks would not be seen, he would “make fire” with flint and steel.
As soon as the bark strips were glowing well, he would cover the hole with the earth he had dug out, leaving only two small holes for draught. Then he would sit crosslegged with the hole in the space between his legs and his entire body and the hole covered with the blanket. Inside the blanket it quickly became as pleasant as a warm room and, hunched over in this position with one hand on his rifle, Simon would sleep in reasonable comfort in the bitterest of weather. More than once he had awakened surprised to find that many inches of snow had fallen."
 

Cruzatte

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A man may be in the woods alone for several reasons. The area in danger of Indian attacks could be pretty narrow or pretty broad depending on the year and area. Much of the upstate New York Vermont New Hampshire and main area could be safe to travel without a lot of fear of Indian attack but still you could eat out of the woods.
Much of Appalachia or in to the ozarks was fairly safe... at times. There was a gray area between well settled and wild frontier.
Living on the Great Plains for almost fifty years I guess has colored my view of history, having read quite a bit about the locals, such as the Osage, Kaw, and Pawnee. These folk did not take too kindly to interlopers in their territory. Traders visited them in large parties, as much for self protection, as to have hands to man the boats, haul firewood, tend to camp chores, clerks to keep records, etc.
 

Scott_C

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Eckert's books were extremely well researched. And in an age before computers: he visited and studied data from a lot of sources, and then turned it into easily readable information. Just page through the bibliography & notes at the rear of his books. In his book, That Dark and Bloody River, he noted any corrections he'd found after his earlier books.
 

Carteret Kid

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Working off a thread in the classifieds, where we are supposed to be limiting discussion, I have questions regarding this quote,



My main question is, when using this to heat food or boil water isn't there a concern that the solder won't hold?

Any other ideas for a small pot or kettle that slightly larger than this cup? It would be nice to heat coffee or tea in the cup and some food in another cup or kettle.
Here is an interesting artifact from that period. I know it is misnamed. I bought something similar newmade;

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/342203271657824739/
Keeping things documentable to about 1750's to 1790 would be nice.

Thanks.
 

Grenadier1758

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As long as there is a liquid in the cup, the solder will hold. Don't boil the liquid out, then the solder will melt.
 

Bo T

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As long as there is a liquid in the cup, the solder will hold. Don't boil the liquid out, then the solder will melt.
From what I have read, most food was boiled in these containers. Likewise, meat was roasted on a spit. And I believe bread was often cooked as dumplings or cooked on a spit. Never attempt to fry anything in these containers.
 
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