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Snapped at the wrist!

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Hi All,

Sad, Sad, Sad, my flinter fell on concrete and the stock snapped at the wrist. I went on youtube to find out how to repair but am wondering if anyone here knows of someone that has real experience with that or knows of someone?

I thank you and so does my rifle....
 

FishDFly

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Send an e-mail to The Log Cabin Shop and ask them about repairing it, if they can't, they will know who can.
 

sussexmuzllodr

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mountainman I did the same thing to a T/C Hawken. Broke like a leg bone.
I used gorilla glue with brass screws through various areas from large to small to bind it back together.
Ground down the brass wood screw to the surface. Little brass dots in some areas but the repair is very strong.
Function now over looks.
SM
 
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mountainman I did the same thing to a T/C Hawken. Broke like a leg bone.
I used gorilla glue with brass screws through various areas from large to small to bind it back together.
Ground down the brass wood screw to the surface. Little brass dots in some areas but the repair is very strong.
Function now over looks.
SM
Thanks, I've read about that.
 

rich pierce

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That rifle looks nice enough to fix properly. Best bet is a hole drilled from the buttplate up through the wrist then a threaded rod epoxied in place. It could be done with the rod starting in the patchbox.
 
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That rifle looks nice enough to fix properly. Best bet is a hole drilled from the buttplate up through the wrist then a threaded rod epoxied in place. It could be done with the rod starting in the patchbox.
Thanks, for the info, I'm going to contact the Log Cabin Shoppe for I'd be worried with me drilling something that long. Thanks for your time.
 

Cattman

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clean it very very well. drill into both pieces a hole the size of a nice wooden dowel. put gorilla glue int the holes and then the dowels. then push back together. the glue will expand and in a couple of days carefully scrape off excess. then go to a bead and leather site and get soft dear skin thread. wrap it around the wrist very neatly very very tight. join the ends onto the wrap with a little super glue. it will look very nice as did the ones in the old days with the same problem. now varnish carefully the leather wrap only. it will seal it and make it very stable. you will like the results better than it was before and many will admire your work.
 

EC121

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Nice clean break. Fill it full of Titebond 3 and wrap it with a piece of rubber or silicone tubing. Then put screws or glue small dowel rods vertically through the break to reinforce it. There is no lengthwise drilling. Sand it down and refinish or cover as suggested above. I recently started using the 1/4" silicone fuel tubing used on my model airplanes. If you stretch it well, it puts a lot of continuous pressure on the break.
 

SDSmlf

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Have seem worse repaired. @rich pierce is right about coming through the butt of the stock. Only suggestion is to try and use multiple smaller threaded rods rather than one larger piece. Makes a much stronger repair (confirmed with a FEA model), though a little tricky to pull off with your repair.

Here are photographs of a repair I did to a 100 year old stock (it was made in 1917). Little bit different to say the least, but it’s the concept of multiple smaller thread rods. I was able to square up the splice area and add a new piece of wood (it was difficult to get a close match). The splice is hidden under the metal ring in the second photo, but it’s very strong and the stock has seen over 1500 high power rifle rounds, among other abuses, and is as good as new.
1593472565343.jpeg

1593472746709.jpeg
 

Rich

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Gorilla glue and screws up thru the trigger guard is what I would look at. Did one about a year ago and still running good.
 

tenngun

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One year in Little Rock we busted a CVA Mountain Rifle at the historic restoration . We had cooked up hoof hide glue the night before and repaired it with that and wet raw hide wrap.
Historic guns were repaired, and though it wasn’t your plan it would make an HC gun. Copper wire wrap was also used as were brass or iron straps inletted in the wrist. Or all three. Glue, screw, inlet strap, wrap with raw hide shrunk in hot sun... should last your life time and make for a good story.
‘Shot a bar and tit up and charged me afore I could load. Hadta beat it ta death with ol’Knoks em dead’
Or
‘D~~n Redcoat(or Indian) put a ball rift through my wrist. I woulda died right thar if’n ‘Fferim hadn’t saved ma life.’
Or some such.
 

EC121

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Getting that break to stay in place would be a challenge with long rods. You would have to glue it to keep it square then drill it. Glue and rods or dowels up through the TG inlet is a good idea. Dowels under the grip rail would also be just about invisible. If you used 1/8" threaded rods, you could plug the holes with same sized wood. Never see it from a moving horse!!

A break like that is why people look for a blank with good grain flow through the wrist.
 
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Sidney Smith

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I'd do the hole and dowel repair, but also. Inlet a brass decoration on top and bottom. Solder a nut to the inside of one, with the nut inletted of course, then drill and countersink the other for a bolt. Glue up the dowel then use the decorative brass and bolt to cinch it together. Sand the brass and bolt head and it will look as if it was built that way.
 

SDSmlf

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Getting that break to stay in place would be a challenge with long rods. You would have to glue it to keep it square then drill it. Glue and rods or dowels up through the TG inlet is a good idea. Dowels under the grip rail would also be just about invisible. If you used 1/8" threaded rods, you could plug the holes with same sized wood. Never see it from a moving horse!!
Difference between a field repair and one done in at a skilled gunsmith.
 

Larry (Omaha)

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Sorry, here's a pic
Rich Pierce has my vote. I would take Rich's idea a step further provided your patchbox is not in the way. Do you have one? Epoxy the front end of the rod per Rich and then if you can rod all the way to the buttplate. A nut and washer can be installed behind the BP. After you put your choice of glue ( mine would be good old Elmers wood glue) you can tighten the nut and suck the fracture together. The best strength in glueing wood is achieved by compressing the joint so the glue oozes out. Alignment will take some finesse, but this method will work.
Good luck
Flintlocklar 🇺🇸
 

SDSmlf

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After you put your choice of glue ( mine would be good old Elmers wood glue) you can tighten the nut and suck the fracture together. The best strength in glueing wood is achieved by compressing the joint so the glue oozes out. Alignment will take some finesse, but this method will work.
Not a fan of wood glue for these repairs. If joint fails, additional wood glue will not bond with old wood blue, at least in my experience. Products like Brownells Acraglas will actually bond to old Brownells Acraglas repairs, again, in my experience.
 

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