Snakes?

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Cattman

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here in western ne. we have snakes and more snakes. the fedex man knocked on my door last summer to deliver some medications. he said to me, i had to walk past 3 snakes to get to your door. i said, oh those things, i just move them out of the way with my cane. i signed for the meds. their was 40 chemo pills. they were 1000 dollars each. he had 40,000 dollars in his hand i signed for. some thing is more wrong than snakes here. a 1000 dollars a pill is pure greed and God does not like greed.
 
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A 4 ft Mojave Green? That's downright scary
Could have been a hybrid.
Both the Mojave and the Western are Crotalus and they will interbreed.
A hint is to look at the banding on the tail and the patterns on the hide.
The Eastern diamondback will likely not interbreed - unless possibly in captivity. (They do not have overlapping territories like the Mohave and the Western do. The colorization and size are likely adaptations to environment, both subspecies descending from the same origin.
My buddy in the reptile business has tried to interbreed the Timber with the Mohave (a green tinted Timber Rattler would be beautiful!) - but they don't tolerate each other. The toxins in the venom are also radically different. The Western has a less toxic venom but a much larger volume where the Mohave has a more toxic venom but smaller volume.
 
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Some years back, I guess about ten, I was on a prairie dog shoot up on the Boquillas ranch near Seligman Az. Was shooting off the ground with a scoped rifle on bi pod. There was an abandoned hole about three feet in front of me with a mound around it. When I got up and looked in the hole there was a nice Mojave looking right at me. After that I checked more closely what was nearby. Gives one an odd feeling.
 

oreclan

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I had rattlesnake once and it had a rank taste like carp. Everyone’s taste buds are different. Was told you have to soak them in milk but we just steaked it and tossed it on the grill.
I ate some water moccasin at a Marine Corps survival school back in the early 1970's. It tasted just like the Neuse River near which it had been caught!
 

Dead-Eye

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mushka said:
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There was a period, in the 1800's I think, when they were fairly commonly domesticated and were pets, although I don't know to what extent they were domesticated. They like to come inside when it's cold, and they unfortunately have a tendency to get stuck in stovepipes and killed. That would jive with juice-jaws' tidbit about the 49ers taming them. They're very mild mannered, and soft and very pretty, and I've heard they're cuddly. I suppose the miners already had fleas around without the cats, or maybe the cats kept the fleas off of the miners.... I've only seen two, and one was stuck in a stovepipe and long-dead. Sad to see something die just trying to get warm.
 
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Be careful where and who you tell about your dealings with rattlesnakes. Make sure you are up to date on the regulations. In a lot of places now it is illegal to kill certain rattlesnakes. Big fines.
Some years back when driving a concrete truck I met a man in his 80's out in the county a ways that said his little dog had been bitten and killed by a rattlesnake in his yard. He had killed 4 more in about a year and asked me what to do about them. I told him the Feds had done reintroduction of rattlers in Arkansas because of some knotheaded idea that the 'environment' just wasn't complete without them. I told him to do what needed doing and keep quiet about it. Funny the govt. didn't ask folks if they wanted more snakes; they just dumped them out around here. So much for 'of, by, and for the people'. The old man died about 6 mos after I talked to him. I hope he went somewhere devoid of rattlesnakes and under better management.
 

Notchy Bob

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My great grandfather had a horse hair rope that he laid out around his bedroll at night when he was camped out in central Oregon. The snakes supposedly didn't like to crawl over it because it tickled their bellies. I think it was more of a mental help than a real one. Maybe it worked. He slept out a lot and never got bit.

My grandfather was an old cowboy that worked in Arizona. He had a horse tail rope. He laid it around his bed roll. Swore by it to keep snakes away.

I like to read the material that was written back in the frontier era. The practice of laying a horsehair rope around your bed, on the theory that rattlesnakes would not cross it, is evidently an old one. This is from George Kendall's Narrative of the Texan Santa Fe Expedition, which was published in 1844:

Kendall p. 73.png


I'm pretty sure I've seen this documented in at least a couple of additional chronicles of early western travel, so it must have been a common practice. It sounds like a simple thing to do, and whether it was truly effective or not, I'm sure it gave believers some peace of mind, and a good night's sleep.

Notchy Bob
 
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I like to read the material that was written back in the frontier era. The practice of laying a horsehair rope around your bed, on the theory that rattlesnakes would not cross it, is evidently an old one. This is from George Kendall's Narrative of the Texan Santa Fe Expedition, which was published in 1844:

View attachment 152868

I'm pretty sure I've seen this documented in at least a couple of additional chronicles of early western travel, so it must have been a common practice. It sounds like a simple thing to do, and whether it was truly effective or not, I'm sure it gave believers some peace of mind, and a good night's sleep.

Notchy Bob

I've seen photos of rattlers crawling across horse hair ropes. :eek:

This is one of our local Prairie rattlers. Was laying along the edge of a local bike path. You can see that it seems to have recently eaten an entire family of mice.

20210718_082829_copy_800x600.jpg
 

Notchy Bob

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I've seen photos of rattlers crawling across horse hair ropes. :eek:

This is one of our local Prairie rattlers. Was laying along the edge of a local bike path. You can see that it seems to have recently eaten an entire family of mice.

View attachment 152891
I'll take your word for it, regarding the hair rope. I have no personal experience with the practice.

Here is a little Florida diamondback, maybe 30"-32" when stretched out:

Rattlesnake.jpg



I had been mowing, and got off the mower to move some debris. I left the mower running, and was also wearing earplugs, so could not hear much of anything. I picked up the debris, carried it up the fenceline and threw it on a pile, then walked back and saw the snake in this position, right where I had walked a minute before. I must have walked right by him, or even stepped over him! Rattlers are not common around here these days, and this one was the first I have seen on or near my property in about 30 years. I was mighty surprised.

Notchy Bob
 

Brokennock

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I'll take your word for it, regarding the hair rope. I have no personal experience with the practice.

Here is a little Florida diamondback, maybe 30"-32" when stretched out:

View attachment 152907


I had been mowing, and got off the mower to move some debris. I left the mower running, and was also wearing earplugs, so could not hear much of anything. I picked up the debris, carried it up the fenceline and threw it on a pile, then walked back and saw the snake in this position, right where I had walked a minute before. I must have walked right by him, or even stepped over him! Rattlers are not common around here these days, and this one was the first I have seen on or near my property in about 30 years. I was mighty surprised.

Notchy Bob
A situation that makes one think.
My late friend had those and coral snakes on his property just outside Fort White, Florida.

And a rat snake well over 6 feet long.
20191024_163303.jpg
 
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Made my living as a wetlands and wildlife biologist, all over the eastern US, and Central and South America. I've had plenty of experience with all sorts of snakes, and to be honest, greatly prefer the non-venomous ones.
To me, the most aggressive species is the cottonmouth, or water moccasin. They are similar to the Mojave green in that they WILL be the aggressor.
I rarely killed any snake, venomous or not. But when you are out in the bushes, jungle, whatever for two or three weeks all by yourself, sometimes a snake will just present him/herself for dinner. Thus, I almost always had salt, pepper, and Tabasco. Most of the corn snakes are probably the best-tasting, while any water snake, to me, tastes like rotten mud might taste. Never really tried the rotten mud, to be sure.
And one of the neatest and prettiest was the so-called pine needle snake. They are maybe up to 10" long, as big around as a common pencil, non-venomous. Rather brightly colored, and they like to live under pine duff. Very hard to find. A bit more common in central Florida pine woods.
Never been bitten by anything with fangs. Couple elaphids, but they have teeth about like 16-grit sandpaper, barely able to break the skin. Elaphids are constrictor type snakes - corn snakes, blacks, etc. Great mouse and rat killers.
 

Notchy Bob

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A situation that makes one think.
My late friend had those and coral snakes on his property just outside Fort White, Florida.

And a rat snake well over 6 feet long.
View attachment 152914

It does indeed make one think. I have tried to be more watchful since then. I’m careful in the woods, but on my own property I let my guard down.

That rat snake is a whopper! We see a few of those every year, maybe up to five feet, but most are smaller. We see more corals on my property than all other snake species combined. They prefer to hide. Their “Plan B” is to escape. However, if threatened or cornered, they will mount a spirited defense. I worked in healthcare (rehab) for 30 years and saw a number of snakebite victims, including a couple of people bitten by corals. Coral snakes do not need to “chew on you” to inject their poison, which is a potent neurotoxin. Their teeth are short, but they only need to scratch the skin, and they will strike. You don’t want to mess with coral snakes.

That photo of the rat snake, if taken in Fort White, is probably within 30 miles of my place.

Notchy Bob
 

Red Owl

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Well, here's an idea. I think Provost (sic?) was on a trip about 1840 in the upper red river country and mentioned mosquito netting so, if you want to be PC and snake free, work up some kind of a mosquito bar.
 
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