shoulder stock

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ADK Bigfoot

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Not quite the same, but I had an 1858 Remington revolving carbine that I shot 6 times...one each per chamber. Not sure which was more threatened...my face or my forehand.

Sold it.

ADK Bigfoot
 

Stantheman86

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Blackpowder (Muzzleloaders) , Antiques and C&R firearms are exempt from that "Must have 16" of barrel to have a stock " rule

I have a "skeleton stock" that fits any repro Colt besides the Dragoon/Walker but I'm ok with never using it . I would also imagine that it's hard to "flip" the gun during cocking to prevent cap jams.
 

hawkeye2

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I thought about buying one of those shoulder stocks myself, they are neat. Just don't try to attach it to your pre 1898 Single action Colt. I have 2 Colt style shoulder stocks but have never tried either yet on my C&B revolvers.
 

Stantheman86

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I thought about buying one of those shoulder stocks myself, they are neat. Just don't try to attach it to your pre 1898 Single action Colt. I have 2 Colt style shoulder stocks but have never tried either yet on my C&B revolvers.
They took the idea from the stock made for the Buntline and I believe Uberti makes this version for Percussion revolvers.

It comes with 2 screws to replace the Hammer Screw depending on the model, I think they fit Pietta with the alternate screw. The stock probably looks cooler as a display item than to actually use on a Percussion gun. I'll try it someday to actually shoot this Uberti Navy, just because I feel I need to try it.

I figure if I can handle a military Flintlock with a 10gr priming charge flashing in my face I can shoot this thing
 
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Have a skeleton type that fits my 60 and 61 Colts. No worse than my flintlock rifles for the so-called flash in the face issue. Works well with no issues for me but nether is a flintlock rifle. It may help that I use no more than a 15- 20gn charge as I`m not hunting anything and more noise and recoil do not equal more fun for me. The paper and clays I shoot seem to not know the difference...c
 

Stantheman86

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They definitely have utility, they just never caught on widely in the original Period.

I just think not many stocks were actually made originally and less were privately purchased or used by the military. Also maybe they just weren't seen as "cool" back then, kinda like Civil War era body armor that soldiers and Officers loved ones purchased for them that were quickly discarded . There's a whole chapter on this in "Myths of the Rifled Musket in the Civil War" .

I always wondered why you read few if any accounts of actual use of detachable stocks on revolvers during the Civil War or on the Frontier, given that most 1860 Armies were cut for them. Remington didn't seem to be worried about them.

Being an ex Army guy I know what it's like to have "uncool" gear that you get made fun of for so maybe shoulder stocks were one of the 1860s "why are you using that crap" gear

They seem like a great idea , I'd think they'd have been popular. I'd have probably used one.
 

Woodnbow

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They definitely have utility, they just never caught on widely in the original Period.

I just think not many stocks were actually made originally and less were privately purchased or used by the military. Also maybe they just weren't seen as "cool" back then, kinda like Civil War era body armor that soldiers and Officers loved ones purchased for them that were quickly discarded . There's a whole chapter on this in "Myths of the Rifled Musket in the Civil War" .

I always wondered why you read few if any accounts of actual use of detachable stocks on revolvers during the Civil War or on the Frontier, given that most 1860 Armies were cut for them. Remington didn't seem to be worried about them.

Being an ex Army guy I know what it's like to have "uncool" gear that you get made fun of for so maybe shoulder stocks were one of the 1860s "why are you using that crap" gear

They seem like a great idea , I'd think they'd have been popular. I'd have probably used one.
Probably because they were neither fish nor fowl. Limited range of the revolver would be stretched somewhat by the use of the stocks but this was in a time in which very few people could have hit reliably much beyond handshake range with a pistol. Of course I don’t know this, but from the reading I’ve done it seems that people shot one handed dualist style for the most part. It takes dedicated practice to hit that way at the target butts, let alone when you’re under fire yourself. If I were a cavalryman I would probably pack a pistol, saber and carbine. Two pistols or more if I could get my hands on them. The buttstock would probably be a novelty and take valuable resources to procure. Resources better used for more useful tools.
 
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