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I just acquired this sword, and was told by a guy who collects original Civil War swords what he thinks.

He said the blade is very old high carbon steel, and probably dates from around the 1800's. He said origin is probably Greek.
It appears this sword is some type of Gladius type sword, based on what I can find.

Your thoughts if any?

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Pietro

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"Gladius" is spot on.

Judging by the handle shape/style, IMO it looks like a (Roman) Pompeii Gladius pattern blade

Here's a repro for comparison:

 
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Loyalist Dave

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I just acquired this sword, and was told by a guy who collects original Civil War swords what he thinks.

He said the blade is very old high carbon steel, and probably dates from around the 1800's. He said origin is probably Greek.
It appears this sword is some type of Gladius type sword, based on what I can find.

Your thoughts if any?

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It's stylized as a Roman Gladius, but it's like a ½ scale, and the grip is constructed wrong, for an actual Gladius. So it may have been a ceremonial sword, perhaps for a fraternal organization such as The Knights of Pythias or older, such as the English Odd Fellows. However those groups tend to have some markings on their blades, and all seem to favor thin bladed, "court" style swords.

You might simply have a well made stage prop, I'm thinking Opera, or the play Julius Caesar, or perhaps a movie prop. The fact that the blade is actually good steel would not rule this out. A prop-master would simply look for something he could cheaply get, and make into the prop. Buying or repurposing a good blade to merely make into a prop would not be out of the question. Today we'd be worried about a good steel blade on stage but even a few decades ago, not so much. The needs of stage or screen, would not necessarily require a proper sized sword, especially for the stage, and in Julius Caesar the actors need daggers, and they are Romans so a Gladius style dagger would work quite well.

WHO KNOWS perhaps this was the Roman Dagger used by Brutus when the character was played by the father or older brother of John Wilkes Booth, or maybe by John Wilkes Booth, himself? Perhaps it was given as a momento to one of them or another famous actor for a great and memorable performance ??? The three Booth brothers did appear in a one night charity performance of that play, in New York City..... senior brother Edwin played Brutus......

LD
 
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