Ruger Old Army

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M. De Land

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I shoot my ROA frequently, I only load with an seperate cylinder loading press and I have replaced the base pin rammer assembly with a seperate base pin. My standard target load is 30gr of fff and I rarely lock the base pin which only occasionally moves forward when fired. I would appreciate your comments just in case I’m being stupid and have been lucky so far
If you want to leave the rammer off then the base pin is still locked by the keep cam, if you remember to turn it down.
 

jdn262

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I also load my ROA using a cylinder loading press rather than risk bending the base pin. A year ago I purchased an Old Army Quick Change Kit from BeltMountain.com that easily allows removing the cylinder rather than hassling with removing/installing the OEM base pin/loading lever assembly when using my cylinder press. Belt Mountain still makes the quick change cylinder kit. Below is a snap shot of the kit. You have to ask for the kit as blued or stainless steel.

1617322628610.png
 

gvandersluis

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I can’t quite figure out how the two pieces work. I guess my question should have been. Does leaving the locking cam unlocked whilst firing present a hazard
 

Dude

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Why would you want to leave it unlocked? It's not like it's difficult to lock.
 

M. De Land

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Why would you want to leave it unlocked? It's not like it's difficult to lock.
I suspect folks get used to the Ruger Black Hawk base pin spring loaded cross bolt lock. Push it home and the spring pulls the bolt through the lock notch in the base pin. In tje ROA you fiddle around getting it all lined up, push it home and forget to turn down the cam lock screw.
 

Woodnbow

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I suspect folks get used to the Ruger Black Hawk base pin spring loaded cross bolt lock. Push it home and the spring pulls the bolt through the lock notch in the base pin. In tje ROA you fiddle around getting it all lined up, push it home and forget to turn down the cam lock screw.
One of these days I’ll weld a small fin on the base pin bolt So I can do it easily without tools.
 

nightwolf1974

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Luckily the 1858 design was so well thought out over a century and a half ago and even if the Uberti and Pietta iterations might not be as excellent as the ROA in some ways, at least the guns are still being made with spare parts available for the foreseeable future.
Actually the ROA is more a Whitney design (like the Spiller & Burr) than a Remington NMA design. My only beef with ROAs is the loading lever linkage and base pin design that falls apart after removal.
 

TFoley

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For those wondering how on earth you can bend the base pin while shooting, the short answer is - you can't.

But you CAN bend the base pin while loading.

Here's how to do it, if you really want to.

For one reason or another - maybe to free up a stuck cap fragment - whatever - you take the gun apart and remove the cylinder. You clear the stoppage/remove the fragment of cap [or whatever] and put it all back together again.

Except that Joe next door talks to you, and asks to borrow your something or other. Handing it to him, you miss turning the locking bolt into position. All LOOKS fine.

Having put the gun on half-cock, you then fill up each chamber until all five/six are ready to take the ball. YMMV.

You put the ball in the chamber mouth and try to ram it into the chamber.

Instead of the ball going in, the loading lever, with it's head firmly located on top of the unmoving ball which then acts as a fulcrum, and base pin rise up out of the unlocked position, clear of the front of the frame and you, still bearing down on the loading lever, bend it at the weakest point - where the locking bolt cut-out is located. with luck [bad luck, on this occasion] you might just break it there, in which case you are futzed.

You have now bent your first base pin!

PLEASE do not try to do this unless you have a supply of unbent base pins. My replacement came from the usual on-line market for a tad under £40.
 

springfield art

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I also load my ROA using a cylinder loading press rather than risk bending the base pin. A year ago I purchased an Old Army Quick Change Kit from BeltMountain.com that easily allows removing the cylinder rather than hassling with removing/installing the OEM base pin/loading lever assembly when using my cylinder press. Belt Mountain still makes the quick change cylinder kit. Below is a snap shot of the kit. You have to ask for the kit as blued or stainless steel.

View attachment 71397
Wow! I'll order one even though I don't have a ROA yet. I have a whiz-bang cylinder for it, just waiting to see one at a sale or auction. I passed on two of them over the last 3 years or so because I had not decided I wanted one as yet! Thanks for the tip.
 

springfield art

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For those wondering how on earth you can bend the base pin while shooting, the short answer is - you can't.

But you CAN bend the base pin while loading.

Here's how to do it, if you really want to.

For one reason or another - maybe to free up a stuck cap fragment - whatever - you take the gun apart and remove the cylinder. You clear the stoppage/remove the fragment of cap [or whatever] and put it all back together again.

Except that Joe next door talks to you, and asks to borrow your something or other. Handing it to him, you miss turning the locking bolt into position. All LOOKS fine.

Having put the gun on half-cock, you then fill up each chamber until all five/six are ready to take the ball. YMMV.

You put the ball in the chamber mouth and try to ram it into the chamber.

Instead of the ball going in, the loading lever, with it's head firmly located on top of the unmoving ball which then acts as a fulcrum, and base pin rise up out of the unlocked position, clear of the front of the frame and you, still bearing down on the loading lever, bend it at the weakest point - where the locking bolt cut-out is located. with luck [bad luck, on this occasion] you might just break it there, in which case you are futzed.

You have now bent your first base pin!

PLEASE do not try to do this unless you have a supply of unbent base pins. My replacement came from the usual on-line market for a tad under £40.
Thanks. Good information.
 

TFoley

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I've just been PM'd by a reader who is having a hard time envisaging the gist of my post, so I'll replicate the scenario - without, obviously, putting stress and strain on the gun itself.

Give me a few minutes to set it up and I'll be back, 'kay?
 

Zonie

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Thank you for the description and the photo.
This exact same thing can happen to the Spiller & Burr and the Whitney cap & ball revolvers.

From the looks of the Ruger Old Army, it is obvious they used the Whitney or the S&B as the basis for their design.
 

TFoley

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I see that you been watching Uncle Mike over on Youtube ;)


I thought that his 35gr of Swiss 3Fg was mite stout, but then at $105 here in UK for a jug I'm a mite meaner with my paper-punching loads than he is. I also noted that he waaaay overfilled the powder measure and then just blew it all away.....must be great to live in a place where you can get Swiss for $5 a pound......

Just kidding.
 
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