Roof Sheathing Lead

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1BadDart

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Lead from scrap yards is $1 a pound here at scrap yards. A couple months ago I picked up 200 pounds from my cousin for $.65 a pound, that's what the scrap yards are paying. He's a scrapper and bought 18,000 pounds of lead keel weights.
 

Johnny Tremain

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Before they shut off the lead here (and it can be found in the hills.)
I never paid more than 15 cents a lb. After the ban, I bought all I could for 50 cents lb.
Now that the scrap yards have been closed. $2 a lb.
 

R Ellis

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Looked on Marketplace yesterday and some are trying to get $3 a pound I now have around 1200 pounds so may have a lifetime supply
 

ord sgt

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I got lead scrap from my workplace before I retired. Paid nothing for the lead. Melted it down and cast into ingots. Much more than I will use in my lifetime. I am using some of the ingots for weight training.
 

Tenmile

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I was in the millwork business for 40 years and back in the ‘80s leaded glass was popular. I saved the lead came cut-offs for rifle balls, good soft lead that pours easily. I still have some. Another source of good clean lead, if you can find it, is from X-ray rooms. I bought some from a scrap yard a few years ago. It’s cleaner than roof-jacks.
Tenmile
 

TFoley

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Last time a local church got robbed of its lead - around 2/3 tons or so - the church commissioners called time out, and replaced it with frawk lead. It's a by-product of the iron and steel industry, and is the next level up of the dross/slag that is often used here UK as a road-surface topping. TBH, it is so utterly useless for anything else yet discovered that the 'travelling community' here in UK, renowned for their nocturnal lead-roofing redistribution, are not interested in it.

This leads to a general tidying up of the church roof before this new stuff is installed, and we, the local shooters of lead, are the inevitable beneficiaries [yippee!!].

Free.

The last lot I got hold of is pre-atomic, that is, older than 1945, and is therefore of far greater value to those who use pure lead without all the inevitable nuclear particulates that make modern stuff less 'leady' than erstwhile.

I've got a stash that will pass to at least a couple of generations of muzzle-loaders, and those, like me, who cast bullets for their unmentionable, but nevertheless very old-style shooters.
 

Loyalist Dave

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Made a big score today when I had to replace my old stove and hauled it to a scrap yard and I ask about lead I got 700 pounds for .70 cents a pound I am good for a long time. You never know until you ask.
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I scored about 100 lbs. of "lead" for free the other day, but most of it is wheel weights. I got about 10 lbs. of soft lead from it, and the rest will likely be made into ingots and traded to some modern hand-casters for soft lead.

LD
 
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In the eastern US, lead was used for flashing for a long time. As roofs get replace, it hits the scrap yards.
I was in London once at some church or cathedral, and they had kept in place the Melted Lead from a WW2 bombing, as a testament to the history of the building. It just ran down like the stalagtites (sp.?) in a cave.
 
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