Rifleman Impact

Discussion in 'Revolutionary War' started by Loyalist Dave, Nov 6, 2017.

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum by donating:

  1. Aug 7, 2018 #61

    yulzari

    yulzari

    yulzari

    40 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2012
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    I enjoyed the story of Lt. Colonel Webster. A lovely example of the opposite to stories where rifleman 'X' fires one shot and hit person 'Y' at 400 yards but you rarely hear the stories of when 40 riflemen fired 5 rounds each at person 'Y' and all missed him. Even though the expenditures of ammunition against casualties show that the vast majority of even rifle shots missed their targets.

    Well done Lt. Colonel Webster in displaying his courage and leadership.
     
  2. Aug 8, 2018 #62

    Artificer

    Artificer

    Artificer

    Cannon Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2014
    Messages:
    8,049
    Likes Received:
    25
    Don't forget the British also employed Hessian Riflemen. I think it was at the Siege of Yorktown where they shot as well or even better than the American riflemen.

    One thing the Rebels did do well was when the rifles of the Americans became damaged or lost, they grabbed the Riflemen for use in the Artillery, as it was said the Riflemen were much better at estimating range than most other soldiers.

    I also believe the British learned far more about the use of Rifles in that war than the U.S. did. This is evident in two rifles that came into usage by both armies at the beginning of the 19th century. The U.S. M 1803 Harpers Ferry Rifle was FAR inferior to the Baker Rifle as a military rifle.

    Gus
     
  3. Aug 8, 2018 #63

    yulzari

    yulzari

    yulzari

    40 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2012
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    Indeed Gus. I treat German troops as part of the British army in which they were integrated under their own officers.
     
  4. Aug 8, 2018 #64

    Artificer

    Artificer

    Artificer

    Cannon Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2014
    Messages:
    8,049
    Likes Received:
    25
    After Dan Morgan was exchanged from a year in prison in Quebec and perhaps where he thought up the idea, he was the first American Commander to integrate Riflemen and Light Infantry at Saratoga. I am not absolutely sure about this, but I think he was the first Commander to have done that in the AWI, as I have not come across an account where the British Army had done that, at least up to that time.

    Have you come across an account of such large scale Riflemen/Light Infantry integration by the British Army before that battle/campaign?

    At the time of the incident of Lt. Colonel Webster in leading his men by crossing the river/large stream on horseback under fire, I believe he was a Major. (I used military courtesy in writing the highest rank I know he obtained as LT. Colonel.) Yes, that was remarkable courage under fire.

    Gus
     
  5. Aug 8, 2018 #65

    yulzari

    yulzari

    yulzari

    40 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2012
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    Possibly one might look at German experiences as they were asked to support the Prince Elector of Hannover aka King George of England (etc. etc.) with light infantry which in Germany meant rifle armed troops.

    The British army had fought alongside Germans for generations before the ARW and must have assimilated many things from them. Even in my days they were still using Hindi, Urdu and Arabic terms in daily colloquial use e.g. dhobi, jaldi, bunduq etc.
     
  6. Aug 8, 2018 #66

    Artificer

    Artificer

    Artificer

    Cannon Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2014
    Messages:
    8,049
    Likes Received:
    25
    Good tip to look more at the period German troops.

    I knew King George I never learned English in his life and that must have been "fun" at His Court.

    Gus
     
  7. Aug 9, 2018 #67

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Cannon Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Messages:
    7,010
    Likes Received:
    7
    The Diary of Johann Ewald, (some spell it Edwald) a jaeger officer, gives some good insight into the Germanic riflemen of the AWI. Ewald penned a manual for Jaeger officers just prior to the AWI, and his work Essay on Partisan Warfare, published in 1785 showed that he had learned quite a lot from serving in the AWI in North America. I'm not sure he took away much from the British, except examples of what not to do. :wink:

    LD
     

Share This Page

arrow_white