Rev. war-longhunter clothing

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Rifleman1776

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ff [btw, I like yer initials :) ], that is very much how I dress as a Rev. Rifleman. Main differences, my round hat is turned up on left side and has some non-pc ornamentations. My hawk is kept in a stout leather sheath for safety reasons. (did I ever tell you about that little scar I have over one of my kidneys?) Enneyhow....lookin' good there.
 

Sicilian Hunter

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It is just a midweight linen. It's good for down here but it doesn't give much warmth during say the later stretch of deer season. I need to add a wool waistcoat under it but I haven't got one yet.
Fireman,
How many ounces are " mid-weight"?
I bought some 7oz thinking of making one out of it but once I got it in hand it feels kind of light to me.

The Sicilian
 

tenngun

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During the Creek War within the War of 1812, a derogatory nickname by British red coats for American militia was "dirty shirts" for the gray copperas ferrous sulfate dyes and black walnut brown dyes. Riflemen in rifle regiments often had green frocks. Tennessee militia had blue frocks. In the 1836 Texas Revolution the Alabama Red Rovers wore red rifleman's frocks, albeit this was likely a sort of madder red dye with oxidation toward a more rusty brown color.

I'd think a brown dye would be good?

On my own later-period frock I intend to sew, my intent is to dye it with nut hulls for the most part. A contrasting fringe might look quite nice too.
We have records of people wearing some bright colors in the woods. Not rifleman shirts but some coats. This to whites and Indians. I don’t know that people were as cognizant of camouflage as we are today. I’ve noticed that even bright colors can disappear in the green wood very easy.
This should not be thought of as saying they were walking around in colored rifleman shirts but I don’t know if we can rule it out. As least from a modren ‘blending in’ point of view.
 

Rifleman1776

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I second Trent/OH

There were very, very few "longhunters", and their timespan is also limited. The average man was a farmer.

The average Joe would normally go about with breeches. 1750 they would be fly front. After maybe 1770, it is likely they would be fall front. Ordinary linen shirt. White for dress, could be natural color or striped or checked for work. Vest (waistcoat) or Jacket (generally meaning with sleeves). Jackets are very "underrepresented" among reenactors today. I have a jacket planned out for myself, and eventually I'll get around to making it. The jacket would be worn for everyday working. A "Coat" has full pleated skirts, full cuffs, etc, and is worn as part of a suit of clothes.

Shoes would be laced or buckled...work shoes were often laced. If you are on "the frontier" you could wear moccasins...but I have always wondered why bother? If you can walk around wearing moccasins, you can just walk around barefoot and save having to make the stupid things (moccasins are no more than a thin leather sock). :grin: Stockings would be worn with shoes, and leggings, spatterdashes or gaiters often worn over them.

The average man's daily headgear would be a black felt hat. He might wear a linen or silk work cap where a broad brimmed hat would be impractical. Other types of hats/caps would be worn in winter.

If you're one of those who wish to ape the manner of the savages, you're lookin' at a shirt, breechcloth, leather or wool leggins, etc.

Or, they wore whatever their wife, white or indian, made for them. I sometimes rankle when absolutes are stated for things we don't know. Individuals were individuals then as now.
 

Brokennock

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Eviden
Or, they wore whatever their wife, white or indian, made for them. I sometimes rankle when absolutes are stated for things we don't know. Individuals were individuals then as now.
Evidence is still evidence. We have documentation and evidence of what they DID wear. While we can't prove or disprove what they didn't wear, anything beyond what we have evidence of is speculation.
While I'm sure not everylong hunter, or rifleman, or frontiersman had their hunting/rifle shirt cut or fringed the same way, I am sure it would have been recognizable as a hunting/rifle shirt "split before," with a Cape, and fringed, somewhere along the basic guidelines of the few extant shirts we have to go by, and the period paintings and descriptions.
 
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Going from original documents mentioning "hunting shirts" worn by men on the Virginia or southern frontier, they describe them most frequently as being of the color white if you want to be unquestionably accurate for your color. Hunting shirts do not seem to have been worn on the more northern (Pennsylvania) frontier. They are also "open in the front" secured around the waist with a "belt" or sash of some form. I hope this helps.
 

Loyalist Dave

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IF you take actual accounts printed in news papers, you will find that hunting shirts were not the regular war at the beginning of the war for riflemen, but became more prevalent as the war continued, including being used for non-rifle units.

LD
 
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