Rev. war-longhunter clothing

Discussion in 'Clothing' started by freeloader, Apr 24, 2010.

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum by donating:

  1. Apr 24, 2010 #1

    freeloader

    freeloader

    freeloader

    36 Cal.

    Joined:
    May 30, 2009
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just got finished watching the Patriot for the who knows how many times, and my question is this. I have been looking at books catalogs etc. for years. I do believe that the Patriot was probably one of the best correct clothing and accoutrement movies ever done. I have been looking at leather clothing and fabric type frocks for a long time. I also like the clothing types that John Curry and Mark Baker wear. The only problem is that in the movie I saw no one wearing anything like that in particular the militia.Even the lowliest of characters (not rich)wore nothing like what I have described above, no leather, no frocks, and no wrap around long shirts like Curry or Baker.So what did the common man (LONGHUNTER) wear. And where can I find such clothing? I have quit a few catalogs and have searched the net and have found very little. Townsends catalog has some nice Rev. war period textile clothing, but alot that is out there does not match up very well at all. Any suggestions? I would like to match the persona of a long hunter of the 1750-1780 period a man of little means since my profession would be that of a hunter or small time farmer with little money,(also true in real life)I am all ears!
     
  2. Apr 24, 2010 #2

    nchawkeye

    nchawkeye

    nchawkeye

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2005
    Messages:
    2,217
    Likes Received:
    6
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 27, 2018
  3. Apr 24, 2010 #3

    trent/OH

    trent/OH

    trent/OH

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Messages:
    2,410
    Likes Received:
    26
    I don't think it's correct to consider a longhunter to be a common man. And they wouldn't meet militia muster requirements when they are gone to the mountains for a year or two at a time.
    The common man was likely to be a farmer, or tradesman, or laborer, or indentured servant.
     
    PluggedNickel and Coot like this.
  4. Apr 25, 2010 #4

    John Wasmuth

    John Wasmuth

    John Wasmuth

    50 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,328
    Likes Received:
    2
    Do a detailed surch on Boone, Wetzle, and a few others from the time period your looking to portray. Some detailed portraits are found on line of people from then. http://www.earlyamerica.com/lives/boone/portrait.html
    Look carefully at the way the coat is patch worked together out of many skins.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 27, 2018
  5. Apr 25, 2010 #5

    Stophel

    Stophel

    Stophel

    75 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    5,491
    Likes Received:
    126
    That picture of Boone is from 1861. It is based on earlier pictures, but the patching seems to be purely the product of the artist's imagination.

    These are from 1820, done near the end of Boone's life.

    [​IMG]

    This one is an engraving done in 1820 copying a full length portrait done that year, but is now destroyed (except for the face, which remains).
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Apr 25, 2010 #6

    nchawkeye

    nchawkeye

    nchawkeye

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2005
    Messages:
    2,217
    Likes Received:
    6
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 27, 2018
  7. Apr 25, 2010 #7

    Stophel

    Stophel

    Stophel

    75 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    5,491
    Likes Received:
    126
    Whatever you do, don't let anyone hear you say that you think that the hunting shirt in the DeVerger drawing might be a pullover shirt!!!!

    :haha:
     
  8. Apr 25, 2010 #8

    jbg

    jbg

    jbg

    50 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,332
    Likes Received:
    1
    Could that dark line going down the front of the hunting shirt be evidence that it is a wraparound shirt?
     
  9. Apr 26, 2010 #9

    Stophel

    Stophel

    Stophel

    75 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    5,491
    Likes Received:
    126
    Just looks like the outline to me, just like the outline everywhere else.

    :wink:

    It's just that I have suggested elsewhere that it could be pullover and it really ruffles the feathers of the "Open Before" cult....who just KNOW that absolutely, positively, without question, there was NO such thing as a pullover hunting shirt...

    :grin:
     
  10. Apr 26, 2010 #10

    Stophel

    Stophel

    Stophel

    75 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    5,491
    Likes Received:
    126
    I second Trent/OH

    There were very, very few "longhunters", and their timespan is also limited. The average man was a farmer.

    The average Joe would normally go about with breeches. 1750 they would be fly front. After maybe 1770, it is likely they would be fall front. Ordinary linen shirt. White for dress, could be natural color or striped or checked for work. Vest (waistcoat) or Jacket (generally meaning with sleeves). Jackets are very "underrepresented" among reenactors today. I have a jacket planned out for myself, and eventually I'll get around to making it. The jacket would be worn for everyday working. A "Coat" has full pleated skirts, full cuffs, etc, and is worn as part of a suit of clothes.

    Shoes would be laced or buckled...work shoes were often laced. If you are on "the frontier" you could wear moccasins...but I have always wondered why bother? If you can walk around wearing moccasins, you can just walk around barefoot and save having to make the stupid things (moccasins are no more than a thin leather sock). :grin: Stockings would be worn with shoes, and leggings, spatterdashes or gaiters often worn over them.

    The average man's daily headgear would be a black felt hat. He might wear a linen or silk work cap where a broad brimmed hat would be impractical. Other types of hats/caps would be worn in winter.

    If you're one of those who wish to ape the manner of the savages, you're lookin' at a shirt, breechcloth, leather or wool leggins, etc.
     
    Coot and Va.Manuf.06 like this.
  11. Apr 27, 2010 #11

    fort fireman

    fort fireman

    fort fireman

    45 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Messages:
    715
    Likes Received:
    1
    This is what I dress out in. I started out wanting to do the longhunter thing but have slowly gravitated toward a scout or rifleman on the frontier of NC in the early 1770's

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I know the leggings look new but when the pics were taken I had just finished the leggings the day before.I wear a breechclout with the leggings when the weather permits. Of course in NC it permits alot. :grin: The caped shirt is from Bell and Co. traders. The pullover shirt I have on is from trailhead traders. I also have a pair of wool leggings made from blue wool and red trim. I got my mocs from arrow but will try my hand at making my own from the left over leather from my leggings.
     
  12. Apr 27, 2010 #12

    John Wasmuth

    John Wasmuth

    John Wasmuth

    50 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,328
    Likes Received:
    2
    Sharp looking regalia indeed! :thumbsup:
     
  13. Apr 27, 2010 #13

    John Wasmuth

    John Wasmuth

    John Wasmuth

    50 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,328
    Likes Received:
    2
    And just whose is ya callin a savage??? :rotf:
     
  14. Apr 28, 2010 #14

    Stophel

    Stophel

    Stophel

    75 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    5,491
    Likes Received:
    126
    I read that somewhere...1770's, 1780's...someone was speaking of how whites on the frontier often "aped the manner of the savages"....don't remember where it was from.. :hmm:
     
  15. Apr 28, 2010 #15

    fort fireman

    fort fireman

    fort fireman

    45 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Messages:
    715
    Likes Received:
    1
    It may have been doddridge. Not sure. When I get a minute to sit down and read I may reread some of the journals and look. If I ever get a minute :grin: I've been busting my butt here lately, but I'm looseing some weight working and getting the new homestead the way we want it.
     
  16. Apr 29, 2010 #16

    Eric/WV

    Eric/WV

    Eric/WV

    40 Cal.

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Messages:
    245
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yep...Scouts were much much more common than longhunters. It seems that all of the forts and settlements along the frontier employed scouts to roam the country side. They mostly traveled on foot, and they carried minimal gear with them.....sounds a lot like the "treks" that we emulate today.
     
  17. Apr 29, 2010 #17

    John Wasmuth

    John Wasmuth

    John Wasmuth

    50 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,328
    Likes Received:
    2
    Twas the Rev Joseph Doddridge apperantly. Or so I think.
     
  18. Apr 29, 2010 #18

    Maestro

    Maestro

    Maestro

    Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2004
    Messages:
    2,095
    Likes Received:
    2
    From the memoirs of John Joseph Henry in "An Accurate and Interesting Account of the Hardships and Sufferings of That Band of Heroes, Who Traversed the Wilderness in the Campaign Against Quebec in 1775."

    "it was the silly fashion of those times for riflemen to ape the manners of savages," (wearing leggings and moccasins) "if [they] could be procured."
     
  19. Apr 29, 2010 #19

    eli crowe

    eli crowe

    eli crowe

    40 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2007
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    0
    Doddridge says in his Notes on the Settlement and Indian Wars:

    "In the latter years of the Indian War our young men became more enamored of the Indian Dress throughout with the exception of the Matchcoat. The Drawers were laid aside and the Leggings made longer so as to reach the upper part of the thigh. The Indian breech clout was adopted"

    I agree with Erics statement about Scouts being more common than Longhunters. There were Forts all along the Western frontier and each Fort had several Scouts that would range from Fort to Fort or Range in the areas around the Forts. I believe the dress of the Scouts and Longhunters would have been similar for the most part but in some instances the Scouts would have "aped" the dress of the Indians.

    I have read accounts of Sam Brady and others dressing like the Natives on some of thier Scouts.
     
  20. Apr 29, 2010 #20

    tg

    tg

    tg

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2001
    Messages:
    10,776
    Likes Received:
    8
    A lot of the better vendors show peole dressed in the 18th century frontier clothing which can give a goodplace to start it is best to back it up with some period pics/writings or discussions like this,so you can keep up within the changes that occured over the last half of the 18th century, the scout/frontiersman is likely the most popular, few seem to want to be the town barber. hooper, ratcathcer or other less romantic figure.A few do take the less traveled path and do well and are greatly respected for their dedication to the hobby.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white