removing solder

Discussion in 'The Gun Builder's Bench' started by Ezeikel, Jan 17, 2020.

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  1. Jan 17, 2020 #1

    Ezeikel

    Ezeikel

    Ezeikel

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    Just rejoined a set of shotgun barrels and as usual got solder everywhere. Ive scaped off the bulk of it but I know as soon as I start to brown them there will be patches of solder that Ive missed. Any one got a sure fire way of getting rid of the excess solder?
     
  2. Jan 17, 2020 #2

    Scota@4570

    Scota@4570

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    Use a sharp blade, like a chissel to scrape. Sand with shaped backers. Cold blue to check. Better to remove the most of it with steel wool while still molten. sw lwss solder next time.
     
  3. Jan 17, 2020 #3

    Ezeikel

    Ezeikel

    Ezeikel

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    Thats fine and standard practice but it gets into the pores of the metal and there must be a chemical method of removing it. Ever tried to do it without using excess solder?
     
  4. Jan 17, 2020 #4

    Scota@4570

    Scota@4570

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    Metal does not have pores that absorb solder. I have soldered dozens of ribs. Just passing on the standard way of dong it. Do what you want.
     
  5. Jan 17, 2020 #5

    Ezeikel

    Ezeikel

    Ezeikel

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    Solder forms an intermolecular bond with the substrate metal and the surface becomes something like an amalgum. Its that I want to remove.
     
  6. Jan 17, 2020 #6

    Scota@4570

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    Then sand or scrape it down to the steel. You are over thinking this.

    Chemicals that remove lead like mercury will also attack the solder joint. Mercury is also now consider to be to toxic anyway. I am not aware of any acid or caustic that selectively attacks lead and not steel. I am not aware any evidence that solder has been cleaned up like this. IF you have big chunks on the surface use a sharp blade, then scrape, then sand.

    IN the future wipe the excess off while molten. Some guys use pencil marks to keep the solder from sticking outside the joint. If you tin the parts first you can heat them then float in minimum extra solder in the joint and avoid a mess.
     
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  7. Jan 17, 2020 #7

    F.G. Ford

    F.G. Ford

    F.G. Ford

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    A milling machine works on a flat surface as well as a sharp chisel, curved surfaces elbow grease works.......sometime.
     
  8. Jan 17, 2020 #8

    Nyckname

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    In electronics, there are suction devices for removing solder while it's being melted with an iron or a micro torch.
     
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  9. Jan 17, 2020 #9

    Ezeikel

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    So how do you get it out of the pores of damascus? The old guys did it and they only had rudimentary gear and I dont believe it would have been commercialy viable to scrape and file every barrel
     
  10. Jan 17, 2020 #10

    Sinner

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    Woven copper mesh strip heated on the excess solder to draw it of the metal. It's called a solder wick.
     
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  11. Jan 17, 2020 #11

    Ezeikel

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    All these ideas STILL leave the thin layer of solder on the surface of the steel or iron. This precludes the rusting process necessary for browning or bluing. Its just about impossible to see until you start rusting and then you get shiny patches. These can take weeks to eliminate and make a simple job tedious. Ive worked in the electronic assembly industry specializing in soldering techniques and all the processes there do not involve the need to remove the surface bond layer. Rusting is something you try to avoid
     
  12. Jan 18, 2020 #12

    Scota@4570

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    Sand off the surface of the steel. Really. I've been gunsmithing for 40 years. It is not a big deal.

    "I dont believe it would have been commercialy viable to scrape and file every barrel"
    Yet that is exactly how they did it.
     
  13. Jan 18, 2020 #13

    flinter1977

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    I work in two way radio and desolder all the time . we use a product called solder wick . it's a roll of braided Cooper . you heat it to the solder you want removed and it wicks it away.
     
  14. Jan 18, 2020 #14

    nhmoose

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    Now you know why having the ribs re-soldered and browned or blackened cost so much. Only way I have seen the solder removed for that is by scraping and sanding.

    I have Blued ,blackened and rusted many barrels over 100K or better. There is no "easy" way.
     
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  15. Jan 18, 2020 #15

    theoldredneck

    theoldredneck

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    Depending on what is being soldered, how and type solder, lead, silver etc. I use soap stone or a carpenter pencil to mark areas I do not want solder to stick. Tin areas to be soldered, never get in a hurry, make sure things fit and are secured together after being cleaned and fluxed. There will still be areas that need to be cleaned but not as many or as bad. Removing it from places it isn't wanted has been covered well.
     
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  16. Jan 19, 2020 #16

    Ezeikel

    Ezeikel

    Ezeikel

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    A good process sir and thank you for the information
     
  17. Jan 21, 2020 #17

    bptactical

    bptactical

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    Ayup, a little time with a pencil is better than a lot of time scraping and sanding
     
  18. Jan 23, 2020 #18

    Ezeikel

    Ezeikel

    Ezeikel

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    Having had to do the scraping bit on two guns in a row I couldnt agree more. Teach me to be a bit more careful wont it?
     

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