Remington 1858 questions.

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HandyAndy

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I just got my first BP gun, a used brass framed Pietta 1858, 8 inch barrel. It seems to be in good condition, but the action of the trigger and hammer will occasionally feel funky, while cycling it, especially rapidly. By cycling it I mean pulling the hammer back to full cock and pulling the trigger, while using the thumb to keep it from fully releasing. It feels rough around the half cocked position. Hard to describe it.

When dry firing it ( with a Q tip to protect the nipple ), it feels fine. Another thing I noticed is that with the hammer resting on the nipple, there's approximately 1/4 inch of free play/no resistance, when pulling the hammer back. Is this normal or a symptom of a problem like a bad spring? I haven't shot it yet, but I'm assuming it should shoot OK.
 

Kansas Jake

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I can't address your experience with the rough cocking. I do have a Pietta 1858 Sheriff's Model I bought used that has the 1/4 of free play when the hammer is down. The revolver shoots fine. You could try adjusting the hammer spring pressure with the little screw on the front of the grip to increase the pressure to eliminate some of the free play. I just left mine where it is.
 

bang

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Disassemble it. Thoroughly clean it
Check parts and surfaces for rough spots. Lube it with a good grease that has good cohesive quality and decent temp range.
Hammer flop if not too much won't hurt as long as it stays up against frame without rattling. Tighten the spring screw on front of grip just snug so it doesn't back out from vibration. If it is still loose then it probably needs a spring.
I would inspect the gap across the top of cylinder along the top strap. Make sure the gap is even along the length. I would do this to judge how it was treated by previous owner. I have seen them where the top strap to cylinder gap indicates some drooping. This indicates very heavy loads used. I'm not saying brass frames are bad. I've seen these issues with 1858s and colts where people used such heavy loads that the 1858 frame stretched and the colt barrel started drooping. Also look at face of receiver end of frame for cylinder impact deformations. Main thing is to know its past.
I think you will find that between 20-25 gns will produce good accuracy and not over stress it.
What is the year make? Production qualities and parts qualities have improved over the years. Majority of these issues were seen in well before 1985 produced guns.
 

HandyAndy

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Thanks.

It's a 2015, if I'm reading the chart correctly. [CN]

There doesn't seem to be any taper in the cylinder to top strap gap. I've only checked it visually though. I don't see any evidence of cylinder peening at the rear of the frame. Nice and smooth. No dents or anything. At the front I can't see anything bad on the only metal there, around the cylinder pin. Feels nice and smooth. As far as I know the prior owner used 30 grains of Pyrodex P in with round balls.

What grease do you recommend? Since I'll have it apart, do you recommend polishing the trigger? To me the trigger feels pretty decent as is. I just dont like the feeling it has around the half cock position.
 

bang

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Good deal. Last owner took good care of it.
I.have a pair of the target 1858s. I find they shoot sweetly with 22-25gns. They will hit well inside 2 inch at 25 yards all day. 30 makes nice boom and smoke. Up to you. I've tried using filler to put the ball at very top of cylinder but found, IMO, didn't make any difference. I seal over the ball with a mix of wax and veg oil melted together in a thick sticky consistency. Some don't. Use to use crisco but it's just too thin and is messy. Don't do it to stop chain fire just to help keep leading down. Chain fire is primarily attributed to using too big of primers and end up having to pinch them so they will stay on. The gap can catch hot gas and cause other chambers to fire. Use #10 and press them with thumb pressure to seat them. Some seat them by pushing them with flat end of a piece of dowel. Never had to myself. That an .454 ball and you are good to go.
Check your PM.
 

TNGhost

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Possible a cap may have fallen into the action and be gumming up the works?

A thorough dis assembly and cleaning, as suggested above, should solve that. I have 4 Pietta 1958s, a pair of "Navy" .36s, a standard steel frame .44 and a brass frame like yours.

My brasser is an older manufactured gun that was marketed by CVA, manufactured in 2002. I picked it up used in like new condition, drawn to it by its striking visual appearance, afforded by the brass frame. Never had a lick of trouble with any of them, my loads and loading procedure being much like bang's. Really no need to crank them up over 25 grains, as your are just wasting powder plinking or target shooting.
 

ab44

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I load 28-30grs and a lighter at around 25-26 I soot an original and use 25yds as well as a closer one . The heavier load seems better at longer distance. Other than that the old girls shoot well. I hear that brass is just pretty but because of metal changes subtly there can be the odd problem.
 

ab44

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This must be a wish fufillment for Hornady. Sittin' around with range closed here and now have 150 cartridges . These were for the Starr . I have a bag of .454's for my remingtons as well.
 

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ab44

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I am trying to nitrate paper. I just crack mine and blow it out I use 28grs more or less usually. I would like to see about nitrating to get a better paper burn I read about. I see we soak paper first. Is it possible to dab a bit of liquid nitrate on a already made cartridge . Maybe a bit would help anyone know more than me out there. That should not be hard. I shoot this old girl. Thanks for help.
 

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Erwan

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You just have to make a supersaturation of KNO³ in te water. When the Saltpetre begins to not dissolve in the water the mix is good.
Put the paper in the bath and let it dry on a flat and non-absorptive surface, never let the paper suspended like a drying cloth: the water will drain your saltpetre and you will have lost more than enough of it, so the ignition will always be bad.
When saturation and drying are well done the paper looks like it has crystals on it... kind of like the fabric for the polyester
That's the old and good way to do it.
If that can help you (sale as food additive): https://www.amazon.com/HUMCO-263794001-Potassium-Nitrate-Shape/dp/B0773N1CLG/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=salpeter&qid=1586377763&sr=8-1

Erwan.
 
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