Refinish A .45 Caliber CVA Colonial Pistol.

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Ol' Traveler

32 Cal
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I own a CVA 45 cal. pistol that I built some 28 years ago not having a clue what I was doing. Really, I still don't. I filed the sear a bit too much. It is dangerously light and usually has to be set very slowly with assistance. I will probably have to replace it if I can find the parts. The wood, I believe, is Beech, because it would not receive stain well and never turned anywhere near as dark as I would have liked. I
plan on redoing this pistol before I start on a Traditions 50 cal. Kentucky Rifle kit that I recently purchased. Two starting questions.... Is it possible to find the Trigger parts that I need and where?? and... How can I remove the original stain to start over on the Stock???
Any help is appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

Tacitus

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I redid mine a few years ago. I just sanded the old finish off, there was too much wood on it anyway. I was a able to get the beech wood to take a dark stain by using Fiebing's Medium Brown Leather Dye. Leather dye will penetrate most any wood, at least any wood type that one is likely to use for guns. Some claim leather dye isn't UV resistant and will therefor fade. I've used it for forty years and haven't noticed any fading. I guess my guns don't get enough UV. After all, I don't store them outdoors.
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Try making your own dye using denatured alcohol and aniline dye powders or liquid universal tint colors.

I've had some success darkening dense, tight-grained woods like maple by using the dye first then stain over that. The dye is different in that it colors the wood fibers. Most stains are pigments suspended in an oil-based medium like a thin varnish; when the varnish cures, the pigments are settled on top of the wood and held there by the cured medium.

Dyes (aka toners) can also help even out the color difference in different pieces of wood or in pieces with a lot of contrast (if one desires to do so).

A word of caution: the alcohol flashes off very quickly, which can result in dark streaks or patches if one area dries and you overlap that area. This has been a challenge for me on larger panels. It should be easier to avoid with smaller pieces.
 
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The angle of the tumbler notch is what makes the sear "hold" You want the tumbler and sear to meet at a 90 degree angle on the tumbler, less than 90 it will be hard to release since you will be fighting the main spring, greater than 90 it will "push off" and not hold.
 

Ol' Traveler

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To those of you who offered suggestions, I Thank you. I have finished the Re-do of my CVA Colonial Pistol. I could have done some things better but that's why we continue to learn. I am far, far happier with the looks of this pistol than I ever was. Now I feel that I will be better mentally equipped with more knowledge when I start on my up coming Traditions Kentucky Rifle Kit project.
CVA Colonial Pistol.jpg
 

Pzart

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Looks awesome, is that a Colonial or a Kentucky, looks exactly like my flintlock. I have a Jukar Kentucky rifle I'm getting ready to fix up a bit too.
Paul
 

Red Owl

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Fun, fun, fun as far as I am concerned. I would get some walnut and restock it with that. You can then checker the wood, etc. and forget about a stain, just put on an oil finish. I would make all the parts. Full stock and have it thin and sleek around the barrel. Make small sights that add to a streamlined look. On a trigger, make your own and PIN it to the stock for a light trigger pull. Probably a side plate just to doll it up some more.
 
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