Reenacting With Hawken Rifle

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Loyalist Dave

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Who here portrays the mountain man era using a Hawken style rifle? Would like to see your pics in full mountain man attire.
Just to throw a wrench at the monkey, few Hawkens made it to rendezvous in the MM period.
Bridger and Carson both had Hawkens, but those were bought just as Mm period ended.
Smith had one ten years before the end of the period, but not while he was a MM, at this point he was a Santa Fe Trader.
Ashley would have one at the very start of the period. However these were outliers. Typical MM had a trade rifle that mostly came from Pennsylvania. Henry, Dickert,Derringer,and about the time Hawkens were pretty popular Leman was making rifles and selling them west.
The big day for Hawkens was this 1840-60 period.
Please don’t misunderstand. There were a few Hawkens that were bought by both American Fur, and Rocky Mountian fur bought Hawkens for ‘voo. These were greatly outnumbered by Pennsylvania rifles
 
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Who here portrays the mountain man era using a Hawken style rifle? Would like to see your pics in full mountain man attire.
Don’t know where you are located, or at least it doesn’t show in your profile, but you may want to check out this thread started by @Frontier's. He should respond to this post. Kit Carson rendezvous 2021
 
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Well if only one beaver hunter had a Hawken then we can say it’s a mountain MAN rifle. Not just the average fellow but then none of us think of ourselves as average! 🤠
I’m sure it was more then one. We know for sure both companies had some Hawkens
They just would not have been the common gun.
Most WW2americans who had a pistol had a 1911.Patton had his ivory handled pistols, and some fliers carted their own guns.
 

Notchy Bob

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@tenngun is spot on. There were some Hawkens brought in to some of the later rendezvous. The problem, I think, is that when most people conjure up an image of a Hawken rifle, they visualize a classic 1850's Sam Hawken halfstock. Hawkens evolved. I would think a well researched, early styled J.&S. Hawken, particularly if it's a fullstock, would fit in well for a pre-1840 event. Good luck finding parts for one of those, though.

I'm not a buckskinner or a rendezvous attendee, but I'm interested in history, I like old guns, and I appreciate authentic kit. Photos and articles I have seen about modern rendezvous reflect a lot of historically incorrect features. The scarcity or absence of horses is a big one... Mountain man society was an equestrian culture. In reading the period literature, there is something about horses on almost every page. Horses got more attention than guns in the memoirs that have been published. However, that is not a criticism of today's rendezvous culture. It's just an observation. I get the fact that it is simply impossible for most people to even own horses, much less bring them to a modern-day rendezvous. So, you have to make concessions. Horses would be one, and thoroughly authentic, period-correct Hawken rifles might be another. I would think the most important thing nowadays is to have a good time with like-minded friends.

With all of that said, I enjoy seeing the pictures. @Phil Coffins and his lady made a great photograph!

Notchy Bob
 
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Thanks for the posts gentlemen, Yes I know the Hawken was more popular toward the end of the fur trade but I really like the style of Hawken rifles. also, buck skins were worn but what percentage really used them? I read somewhere that the mountain men started out with what they had and as those got wore out went to buckskins. My black powder club has a couple rendezvous a year and a monthly shoot that some are in period dress. I want to put together a persona that reflects the use of the Hawken rifle but stays in the 1840 date. Phil that is great pic, thanks for posting it.
 
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Pretty sure the Hawken brothers started in the early 20s making rifles in St. Louis, if that's the case their early rifles most likely would have been flint. Only conjecture here on my part but I think the rifle would have looked more like Jeager than what we think about in the Hawken rifle.
 
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Pretty sure the Hawken brothers started in the early 20s making rifles in St. Louis, if that's the case their early rifles most likely would have been flint. Only conjecture here on my part but I think the rifle would have looked more like Jeager than what we think about in the Hawken rifle.
The earliest known Hawkens look like Maryland or SMR. Jacob made full stock guns in Saint Louis before Sam came to work with him.
Brass and even silver was known on their guns. Besides their big boys they made light Ohio style rifles and some Fowling guns.
Sometimes we think Jaegar and think early eighteenth century guns. Jaegar made at the same time as Hawkens did look very much like full stock and half stock Mountian guns
 

Frontier's

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A traditions st.louis hawken is my choice. A real style hawken is just too heavy for me.
 

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Banjoman

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I don’t participate in re-enactments but this is some of my mountain man gear. It’s an ongoing project of changing or updating accouterments to be more historically correct which involves a lot of reading and research. The old TC Hawken is a good gun but it will eventually and hopefully be replaced with something that is more authentic to the mid 19th century era.
 
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PatrickL01

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Semi tongue-in-cheek I have considered promoting re-enacting the 1980's. All I would have to have is a Red Man hat, a woodland camp army jacket, a green metal Coleman cooler, and my choice of a CVA or Thompson Center Hawken. It would automatically be period correct! It would also take me back to that time when these great rifles were respected and admired instead of sneered at. Bonus points for a fringed possibles bag! I do love and miss those times.
 
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Semi tongue-in-cheek I have considered promoting re-enacting the 1980's. All I would have to have is a Red Man hat, a woodland camp army jacket, a green metal Coleman cooler, and my choice of a CVA or Thompson Center Hawken. It would automatically be period correct! It would also take me back to that time when these great rifles were respected and admired instead of sneered at. Bonus points for a fringed possibles bag! I do love and miss those times.
I was there!!! Good times indeed.
 

dgracia

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Pretty sure the Hawken brothers started in the early 20s making rifles in St. Louis, if that's the case their early rifles most likely would have been flint. Only conjecture here on my part but I think the rifle would have looked more like Jeager than what we think about in the Hawken rifle.
From what I recall their early rifles were full stock flintlock longrifles and not the shorter Jaeger style. Their Dad made those before they moved west and then I believe one of his sons joined him making rifles for a bit too. Seems to me I remember seeing a full stock flintlock Hawkens at the Cody Museum. Was from when the family was in Ohio IIRC. Somebody here has to have more specifics.
 

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