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Discussion in 'Historically Accurate Equipment' started by kbbgood, Aug 8, 2018.

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  1. Aug 8, 2018 #1

    kbbgood

    kbbgood

    kbbgood

    32 Cal.

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    I have an old rifle that was family owned 4-5 or more generations back. It was told it was my great great grandpa's squirl rifle. It is a 32 cal I think. Not in very good shape and has not been shot in my life time. I took it to a guy that works on them a little, not muck. He said it was made in Pennsylvania. Not a long stock type. Looks more like a Hawken type but not a Hawken. He said only worth about $350 or so.

    My question is; is it worth trying to get it shooting? Barrel rusted inside but action is working. Stock not in good shape but could be worse.
     
  2. Aug 8, 2018 #2

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

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    It’s your family gun, so what you do with it can’t be judged by any one else.
    If the barrel is rusted on the inside it could have deep pits that could bust a barrel apart if shot. In small caliber that’s unlikely to be overly dangerous to the shooter, but it could cost the family it’s gun.
    The old stock might be cleaned and even refinished, that would hurt the sale value of the gun but would blow new life in to the heirloom.
    To me guns are made to be used and cared for. If it was mine I would do what I could to restore it to function, including refinish work, but at that point monetary value is lost. I would get the barrel xrayed clean the bore and give it a shot if it’s safe. Shoot it a bit and even take it after game, but treat it with the kindness of an old dog.
    If the barrel is not safe I would do what I could to halt any further loss, do no more then a good cleaning and oiling. Then preserve it for future.
    Many guns from the Hawken period were made in that half stock style, many used ”˜English’ style furniture. By the 1830s that general style was very popular and would remain so till suppository guns became popular.
     
  3. Aug 8, 2018 #3

    Nativearizonan

    Nativearizonan

    Nativearizonan

    54 Cal. MLF Supporter

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    If it was mine, from my family, I wouldn't shoot it. I would clean and oil it well to keep the rust from spreading, but not use any abrasives, steel wool, or wire brushes. You definitely don't want to remove any of the patina from the exposed metal on the gun. You can also put some raw linseed oil on the stock sparingly, to keep the wood from drying out. Don't put any boiled linseed or tru-oil on it; that would make it look like somebody refinished it with shellac, a big no-no.
     
  4. Aug 8, 2018 #4

    necchi

    necchi

    necchi

    Cannon MLF Supporter

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    Nope.
    Unless you have the money to invest in at least a reasonable restoration to get it in shooting condition, (fresh it out, stabilize the wood, polish the lock/trigger).
    And more importantly,, have someone in the family worthy of accepting the rifle as restored and shootable.
    At your age is there kids, grand kids, nieces/nephews that are at least interested in ML or that rifle?
     
  5. Aug 8, 2018 #5

    Phil Coffins

    Phil Coffins

    Phil Coffins

    40 Cal.

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    Pictures would be appreciated and could get better responses. You should not try to bring it back to shooting order your self. Although you may be very handy an old rifle needs the attention of people that do this special work to preserve the rifle and perhaps make it a shooter again. A lot of people have done the right things to keep it in the family for this long, you can be the next link.
     
  6. Aug 13, 2018 #6

    Redstick Lee

    Redstick Lee

    Redstick Lee

    Blowin' Smoke MLF Supporter

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    you said it's not in great shape........if the bore isn't wrecked with pitting , load it lightly and have a ball!!
    that's what they were made for.
     
  7. Aug 13, 2018 #7

    kbbgood

    kbbgood

    kbbgood

    32 Cal.

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    I'm not sure I could even seat a ball down the bore.
     
  8. Aug 14, 2018 #8

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

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    Can you run a patch down it, fairly tight on a jag?
     
  9. Sep 1, 2018 #9

    stubshaft

    stubshaft

    stubshaft

    40 Cal.

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    Send it to Bobby Hoyt for a rebore/reline. It normally does not affect the appearance of the exterior and is relatively inexpensive.
     
  10. Oct 15, 2019 #10

    Flintlock1640

    Flintlock1640

    Flintlock1640

    36 Cl.

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    Pictures?
     
  11. Oct 16, 2019 #11

    wcubed

    wcubed

    wcubed

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    You say you took it to a guy who works on them a little, not muck (much?).

    Did he check to see if there was a load in the barrel?
     
  12. Oct 17, 2019 #12

    catman

    catman

    catman

    45 Cal.

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    Yes send it to Bobby Hoyt for a rebore/reline for sure, as said before.
     
  13. Oct 17, 2019 #13

    Daryl Crawford

    Daryl Crawford

    Daryl Crawford

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    That's a tough one. I'd probably clean it up to make it a wall hanger, but it would be cool to take game with your great-etc-grandfathers gun.
     
    Ames likes this.
  14. Oct 17, 2019 #14

    Eterry

    Eterry

    Eterry

    45 Cal.

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    Ive seen some barrels pretty heavily pitted that still shot decent. Not a target rifle by any means, but certainly shootable.

    I'd first make sure it isn't loaded, then scrub the bore and see if it can be shot.
     
  15. Oct 19, 2019 #15

    nhmoose

    nhmoose

    nhmoose

    58 Cal. MLF Supporter

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    Folks post is over a year old. OP last seen on site 1 year ago
     
  16. Oct 19, 2019 #16

    Ames

    Ames

    Ames

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

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    The horned toad says we should go to Mexico.
    That's okay. Thoughts are thoughts.
    How about get a new barrel for it and go shoot it, for granddads sake. But hang on to the original barrel for the next generation in the family that just wants to look at it as original, take out the working barrel, not fire it?
    Don't tell me its too much work. We all have taken on worse projects.
     

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