Ranger muskets

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum:

Loyalist Dave

Cannon
Staff member
Moderator
MLF Supporter
Joined
Nov 22, 2011
Messages
11,158
Reaction score
5,360
Location
People's Republic of Maryland
From what I've read various Ranger units (including Rogers Rangers) during the F&I War carried a variation of Muzzleloaders, Blunderbusses; British BB Long Land pattern; Fowlers; and even American made Rifles. They were given quite a bit of leeway when it came to weaponry, and weren't subject to the enforcement of standard British Army issue kit.
Yes of course....the debate is IF they were issued a "stand of arms" which is a British musket, bayonet, and cartridge box, they would've been subject to the British regulations for those arms.

LD
 

Loyalist Dave

Cannon
Staff member
Moderator
MLF Supporter
Joined
Nov 22, 2011
Messages
11,158
Reaction score
5,360
Location
People's Republic of Maryland
But, the Ranger's short guns didn't always have a bayonet, did they? ----- Also, if the Ranger's were arming themselves with their own personal weapon that they had previously modified they would not be subjected to the king's rule, would they? They might get punished for cutting down one of the king's guns, but not their own, right? ---- I don't know the answers. I am just saying hypothetically.

Again, this has already been established, many many posts ago.


The problem. again from many posts ago, is when folks take a Bess, as living history people, and cut it down, and call it a Ranger Gun.

IF they want a short gun, then chop a trade gun, or Fusil de Chase, or even an old version of a Charleville, or heck get a dog-lock musket and shorten that, more power to them.

The Crown nor the Generals didn't specify anything other than the men with their own arms had to get approval. Nothing has been found to show what the Artillery (the guys doing the approving) had as the standard.

Just don't saw-off a Bess. ;)

LD
 

FlinterNick

54 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
1,589
Reaction score
712
But, the Ranger's short guns didn't always have a bayonet, did they? ----- Also, if the Ranger's were arming themselves with their own personal weapon that they had previously modified they would not be subjected to the king's rule, would they? They might get punished for cutting down one of the king's guns, but not their own, right? ---- I don't know the answers. I am just saying hypothetically.
There’s a lot of hypothetical theories of what the rangers did, simply put not much is documented. I think the value of assumptions should examine what we have an know, hard evidence. The museums have the muskets, various collections in publication by Bailey Neumann and Moller. Almost none offer mention of a rangers musket, other than a short land bess with a 42” barrel that is etched ‘Queens Rangers’.

Regarding the use of personal arms. Those who enlisted as rangers were expected to bring their own arms “governor Guy Carlton“, however Carlton determined the arms were not in acceptable form or shape. The rangers were subsequently issued standard long land and short land muskets and placed under the command of Butler, this is documented in Butler’s journals and can be cross referenced to other sources.

With that said, Brown Bess muskets were issued with a bayonet indexed and marked ! These indexes were then booked in a ledger for record keeping. The rangers that were issued arms are now under the ordinances rules and regulations. You shorten that musket the bayonet no longer will have a home or you’ve just made the Artificier’s job a lot more complicated, and he will like report you for it as he will not want to have to answer for an orphaned bayonet. Therefore I highly doubt that many cut back a bess issued with a bayonet.

Those who were fortunate enough to have acceptable personal arms probably could do as they wished, I’m assuming. However I ask myself this question, if you could get a standard issued arm from the British, why would you risk using your own personal arm in the field? Ammunition would be supplied by the British, you’d have to supply your own at that point and possibly be in a situation where you can’t find suitable ammo.

We tend to follow sources that are hyperbole, such as cienma (TURN) and various sketch books And the reenactment units love their fantasy guns.
 
Last edited:

FlinterNick

54 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
1,589
Reaction score
712
I think one factor that people often forget is that there was a significant number of Bess Variants with shorter barrels. British Carbines, Musketoons, and light infantry Fusils provided a variety of prefabricated arms. The officers of the regiments could request some variants of those arms, especially if they met the designation of a light infantry unit. With that said, why cut down a bess when shorter arms were already available.
 

Loyalist Dave

Cannon
Staff member
Moderator
MLF Supporter
Joined
Nov 22, 2011
Messages
11,158
Reaction score
5,360
Location
People's Republic of Maryland
I think one factor that people often forget is that there was a significant number of Bess Variants with shorter barrels. British Carbines, Musketoons, and light infantry Fusils provided a variety of prefabricated arms. The officers of the regiments could request some variants of those arms, especially if they met the designation of a light infantry unit. With that said, why cut down a bess when shorter arms were already available.
Yeah, in England.
If there were lots of various available muskets types for the Regular soldiers then orders to recruit men already armed would not have been a problem, nor would Rogers have had to go out and get them made, as he did.

LD
 
Top