Puddin’

Discussion in 'Camp Cooking' started by tenngun, Jul 26, 2019.

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum by donating:

  1. Jul 26, 2019 #1

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    11,138
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Location:
    Republic mo
    What do you get when you mix alpha dogs with a key board on a forum? At some point an otherwise innocent statement begs a response and pretty soon we have some standing hair stiff legs and a closed thread:(.
    In our last ‘Wheat bread’ thread we did get in to Boston brown bread, that’s more of a pudding.
    Old puddings were pretty easy compared to a baked bread. No oven, no worries about temp, just add to hot water and boil... easy peasy. In fact a peas pudding was a great lunch on the field.
    Should you have a never ending stew on the boil a pudding can be tossed in with other ingredients and it will pick up the pots flavors.
    The Townsend cocking vids on you tube ran about a whole season on puddings
    I love ‘em and carry a pudding on a trek often.
    How many of you all make puddings?
     
    Nyckname likes this.
  2. Jul 26, 2019 #2

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Cannon MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Messages:
    8,569
    Likes Received:
    1,285
    Location:
    People's Republic of Maryland
    Boiled pudding for dessert is most excellent.
    Savory pudding is great for the entree..., or as Tenngun pointed out, added to the stew pot but beware, they take several hours boiling. So practice at home first, but they are an amazing side dish when timed right with your main entree and used instead of dressing.
    I also own 3 steamed pudding molds.
    NOTE:
    I don't care what any websites tell you, I've tried a whole bunch of substitutes..., then I found a website dedicated to traditional boiled pudding and I found a real butcher. Sorry I didn't save the link but what it taught me was one basic principle that has not failed me yet no matter what puddings I've tried...here it is...
    There is NO known substitute for proper raw suet from around the kidneys of a cow or a sheep for a boiled pudding recipe that calls for such.
    There it is. Sorry, but if you can't get the suet, you can't make that pudding. (Sorta like if you can't get hops you can't make beer.) There are some puddings that don't call for the suet, found in old cook books, and I've not tried those, as soooo many of the recipes that I found were basically the same thing.

    A suet dough, with a specific flavoring ingredient that changed the name...
    Plum duff = chopped dried prunes
    Spotted Dick (or Spotted Dog) = raisins and sultanas
    Hunter's Pudding = raisins, currants, and the zest of a lemon peal, plus brandy
    Plum Pudding = raisins, currants, mace, ginger, nutmeg (no plumbs; don't ask me why)
    Rolly Polly = strawberry jam spread in a layer on top of the pudding after it was rolled out, then rolled like a pumpkin roll and boiled
    Figgy Pudding = dried figs
    Queen Elizabeth = dried cherries rehydrated with cherry brandy


    LD

     
    RAEDWALD and Nyckname like this.
  3. Jul 26, 2019 #3

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    11,138
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Location:
    Republic mo
    ‘Plumbs’ was used for raisins back in the day, old plumb duff was made with raisins also. At sea only boaswi’ns (boatswains) and, shall we say, disreputable people could whistle. An exception being when making plumb duff. The maker had to whistle when making up the dough, to prove he wasn’t sneaking raisins.
    I have used butter and lard in puddings. It ain’t suet but will work. Underline it ain’t suet, makes a big difference.
     
    Nyckname likes this.
  4. Jul 26, 2019 #4

    Kansas Jake

    Kansas Jake

    Kansas Jake

    54 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2015
    Messages:
    2,421
    Likes Received:
    333
    Never made puddin but now giving me a hankering to try. Maybe I’m just hungry since I haven’t had supper yet.
     
    tenngun and Nyckname like this.
  5. Jul 27, 2019 #5

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    69 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    3,701
    Likes Received:
    1,449
    Guess were in the same boat. short of a dumpling.
    How about a good pudding (simple) recipe guys? I may do some cooking this weekend.
     
  6. Jul 27, 2019 #6

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    11,138
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Location:
    Republic mo
    Two fer, dinner and dessert.
    Equal weights of flour and suet. It’s hard to get suet butter works but isn’t as good.
    Say 1/2 a pound each. Plain you make it with a little salt and mix dry together
    Whip four eggs with a cup of cream, half and half or milk. Then pour it in to the dry to make a stiff paste.
    Add a square yard of natural fiber cloth to a large pot of boiling water for about a min or so.
    Remove and spread out. Flour one side.
    Put the batter in the center of the cloth and pat out to a flat shape.
    Meanwhile, slice a pork or beef roast about a pound in to thin slices. And an onion sliced thin.
    Layer the meat and onion with salt and pepper in the middle of your bag. Pull up the sides so as to cover the meat with bag and dough. Tie the bag closed not real tight and put in to the pot of boiling water. It takes about four hours to cook, and as it steams down only add boiling water back or it slows the cooking time.
    Take the basic flour suet mix and add 1/2 a pound of raisins. Some lemon zest and some candied fruit if you like it, I prefer it with just raisins. Cream or half and half is better then milk in the dessert version but milk works. Nutmeg about a teaspoon and a bit of molasses or brown sugar just a 1/4 cup or so, and a jigger of brandy or spiced rum.
    When mixed up it should or a thick paste and just put in the middle of your cloth.
    Tie the bag shut and boil again four hours or so.
    Slice and serve with pudding sauce.
    That’s equal parts sherry,sugar and butter.
    Maple syrup can also serve or Brandi can be added to the sauce.
    Plain butter is good or honey.
    In the morning the pudding can be sliced and fried in butter, eaten plain with a little butter is good.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2019
    Nyckname likes this.
  7. Jul 27, 2019 #7
  8. Jul 28, 2019 #8

    Kansas Jake

    Kansas Jake

    Kansas Jake

    54 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2015
    Messages:
    2,421
    Likes Received:
    333
    The meat pudding seems to be a giant stuffed dumpling or ravioli.

    The plum pudding says to unmold from the container. My thought after a year is it would all be mold.
     
  9. Jul 28, 2019 #9

    Zonie

    Zonie

    Zonie

    Moderator Staff Member MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2003
    Messages:
    29,412
    Likes Received:
    1,963
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    One of the specialties my mother-in-law used to make was Yorkshire Pudding with roast beef. The recipe goes back to the early 1700's for you folks that want to relive the early times. :)

    Yorkshire pudding isn't like a boiled pudding. Instead, it is baked.
    The thing that makes it so good is, it is baked in the drippings and grease that runs off of the beef while it cooked so it absorbs all of the flavor and goodness of the meat.

    Yummy good stuff although like all of the things that taste really good it is probably bad for your heart. Yummy anyway and well worth the eating in my opinion. :) :) :)

    Here's a Betty Crocker recipe for it. (How can you go wrong with a Betty Crocker recipe? They are always are good. :) )

    https://www.bettycrocker.com/recipe...-pudding/ba3b2ed7-b0d6-4770-b946-e4fb6fd3541a
     
    tenngun likes this.
  10. Jul 28, 2019 #10

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    11,138
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Location:
    Republic mo
    I’ve eaten it,nevermade it.
     
  11. Jul 28, 2019 #11

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    11,138
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Location:
    Republic mo
    Yeah, different names in different cultures, same idea. Tamales and pot stickers and Polish-German ‘pot pies’ all fit in. The thing that’s handy is if trekking or going to a camp you can make a meat pudding,leave it in a bag and carry it or keep it in your camp for a few days till served safely.
    Plump pudding can be treated with brandy while kept. A fruit cake is basically a baked plumb pudding. I used to make my Christmas pfruit cake in February toserve at Christmas
     
  12. Jul 28, 2019 #12

    Poboy

    Poboy

    Poboy

    40 cal - b MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2018
    Messages:
    238
    Likes Received:
    54
    Screw U canned brown bread is NOT pudding. Pull your head out buddy!!!
     
  13. Jul 28, 2019 #13

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Cannon MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Messages:
    8,569
    Likes Received:
    1,285
    Location:
    People's Republic of Maryland
    The Following is from The Complete Housewife, c. 1750
    PUDDING.JPG
    So for a translation:
    20 ounces of beef suet, which is then grated, with any membrane remove
    12 ounces of raisins
    1 grated nutmeg
    4 ounces sugar
    Pinch of salt
    1/4 cup of sweet sherry
    four MEDIUM eggs
    four tablespoons of cream
    1 cup of fine flour

    Add extra flour as you mix (if needed) to get the batter "pretty stiff".
    Using a linen or cotton cloth, about 30" square (maybe larger) rub cold butter onto one side...Then put he batter into the center, and tie up the cloth so that there are no air gaps and no opening for water to get direct contact with the batter.

    Boil in water for four hours, replacing some of the water as it boils off.
    Be careful when removing from the water as it will be very hot. Place on a dish and allow it to drain and partially cool, then open the cloth.

    Sugar and cold butter, creamed with some rum is "hard sauce" which goes quite well with this as a dessert.

    LD
     
  14. Jul 28, 2019 #14

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    11,138
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Location:
    Republic mo
    Did not mean an insult to you. Can you explain the differences between brown bread and a pudding?
     
    Nyckname likes this.
  15. Jul 28, 2019 #15

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    69 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    3,701
    Likes Received:
    1,449
    I agree with Poboy,
    It is not a pudding, puddings are boiled in water. Brown bread is baked in the can which acts just like an oven, pressure canning raises the temperature above that of boiling water.
    Also;
    The ingredients are those of a bread, not a classic pudding.
    (WATER, WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR*, MOLASSES, DEXTROSE, RYE FLOUR*, WHEY*, DEGERMINATED YELLOW CORN MEAL, BAKING SODA, BUTTERMILK*, SALT, CORN OIL.}

    Now if we really want to dice the carrots we would call it a "quick bread" since the leavening is supplied by baking soda and not yeast.
     
    Poboy likes this.
  16. Jul 28, 2019 #16

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    11,138
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Location:
    Republic mo
    65B6A528-1CF1-4DCC-AB8C-7E1F8A02D475.jpeg I don’t think it’s cooked under pressure at least at home. The can is just a container it’s not air tight. I make it in an open can and have made it in a pudding bag. And in the copper one quart pot I got from Townsend. I don’t think an open can could hold pressure enough to raise the temp above boiling.
    The first puddings were meat or meat and grain and the bag was the stomach or a paunch. They were more sausage like. Haggis is a pudding.
    Peas pudding is just a smashed garden peas or maybe a small bean cooked plain or with a little salt and bacon.
    Hasty pudding is just cornmeal and salt, puddings in a haste are dumplings made of crushed ships bread fat and raisins or crushed jerky. Boiled without a bag. Pot pies are also dumplings cooked in the soup.
    Tamales are all corn meal and filling using husk instead of a bag paunch or stomach.
     
    Nyckname likes this.
  17. Jul 28, 2019 #17

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    69 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    3,701
    Likes Received:
    1,449
    That's a nice pot :thumb:
    I like seeing pots that look used.
     
    Poboy and tenngun like this.
  18. Jul 29, 2019 #18

    zimmerstutzen

    zimmerstutzen

    zimmerstutzen

    70 Cal.

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Messages:
    5,243
    Likes Received:
    162

    Got to watch that heading. "Puddin" here is not the same as a desert "pudding" It is a simmered up pot full of ground up hog parts and some skin, (Indeed everything but the squeal. Kidneys, snouts, hearts, all the bones are cooked until the meat falls off) cooked until it gets very thick. Then salt and pepper are added. The mixture is then ladled into loaf pans and allowed to cool. It sets when it cools. In one area of this region, it is stuffed into intestines like sausage and called ring puddin. I like it when hot and right out of the kettle, but I find it too greasy when sliced for the meat in a sandwich.
     
    tenngun likes this.
  19. Jul 30, 2019 #19

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    11,138
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Location:
    Republic mo
    I did leave the apostrophe on the end for the missing g.
    Same root, the first puddings were all meat. All and all it was easier to boil then bake.
     
  20. Jul 30, 2019 #20

    zimmerstutzen

    zimmerstutzen

    zimmerstutzen

    70 Cal.

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Messages:
    5,243
    Likes Received:
    162
    There was a mention above of the Christmas plum pudding. When I worked in DC, the firm had a long time customer who was a classic English chef and was also Jamaican. Every year about the 20th of December she brought us a huge plum pudding. Weighed about 15 pounds. So drenched in rum that we didn't feel safe to drive for a couple hours after consuming a piece. But it was sooo good.
     

Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page



arrow_white