proper way to tie a sash

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adkmountainken

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just wondering if there is a proper way to tie a sash so it will stay tight? wearing it over a frock.
 

andy52

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I start with a butcher's or surgeon's knot and then just another knot on top. The first type of knot doesn't slip as bad and will hold as you tie the second one.
 

Beau Robbins

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It's very simple. Hold each end in your hands with the the sash run behind your back. Bring the left hand forward and across your front while simultaneously letting go with the right. Bring your right hand forward gripping the sash. Use the left hand to ball up the entire sash into the right hand. Then use the right hand to throw it into the trash and get a leather belt.
 

Loyalist Dave

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just wondering if there is a proper way to tie a sash so it will stay tight? wearing it over a frock.
“Young as I was I was possessed of an art which was of great use. It was that of weaving shot pouch straps, belts, and garters. I could make my loom and weave a belt in less than one day. “

So Doddridge is referring to a sash when he writes “belt”. He also documents a woven shooting bag strap, while there are some that think bag straps should be leather, not woven.

“The belt, which was always tied behind, answered several purposes, besides that of holding the dress
[hunting shirt] together. In cold weather, mittens, and sometimes the bullet-bag, occupied the front part of it. To the right side was suspended the tomahawk and to the left the scalping knife in its leathern sheath."

“The Indian then threw his tomahawk at his
[the fleeing man’s] head but missed him ; he then caught hold of the ends of his [the fleeing man’s] belt which was tied behind in a bow knot. In this again the Indian was disappointed, for the knot came loose so that he got the belt but not the man,…”

Joseph Doddridge Notes on the Settlement and Indian Wars of The Western Parts of Virginia and Pennsylvania

LD
 

Grenadier1758

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When I wore the serjeant's sash, I wrapped it once around over the top of my clothing and my sword belt and secured the sash with an over hand knot. I was not using the sash to hold anything. Other belts held what needed to be held.

Sometimes, I am in civilian clothing and a sash is worn for decoration and to be stylish. The sash may be put into use as a temp line and is long enough to be wrapped twice around my waist and tied with an overhand knot (square knot) and the ends are short. The double sash will hold a knife sheath. If planned correctly, the sash can be passed over the front strap of the shot pouch to secure it and keep the pouch from hanging loose.
 

NorthFork

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I clicked on this thread as I was hoping for some pics of said tied sashes. All I've accomplished is getting headache. Especially from @Beau Robbins . I thought he was being serious at first :doh: :)Can't get a straight answer from any French Indian War/Early fur trade reenactor either. Hmmmmmm..............
 

tenngun

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I don’t think it’s a matter of straight answers as sash is difficult to use in real life, but shows up historicly. So we fiddle with it, and never get it exactly right
 

Brokennock

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I clicked on this thread as I was hoping for some pics of said tied sashes. All I've accomplished is getting headache. Especially from @Beau Robbins . I thought he was being serious at first :doh: :)Can't get a straight answer from any French Indian War/Early fur trade reenactor either. Hmmmmmm..............
I will go through my pics and see what I can find. Not sure exactly what you are looking for. As near as I can tell there is no special knot. I usually start with a simple overhand knot, but I pass the working end around twice and work things pretty tight. Then I continue on to what would be a square knot. Sometimes I tie this in front and slide it around until the know is behind me. On a longer sash that I wrap around myself twice I will actually work through tying it behind my back.
 

necchi

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just wondering if there is a proper way to tie a sash so it will stay tight? wearing it over a frock.
The proper way to tie a sash is with decorum and in a presentation manner. With a simple fold-over while maintaining proper posture and composure during the event you will attend while presenting your best clothes and decorative sash.
Kinda like Sunday best,,
If you want to use a sash as a belt, then just wrap it around a couple times and tie an overhand or two to cinch it up tight.
The "sash" was always meant to be foo-fa-ra, a "pretty" item of dress. Many times hand made with care and purpose then gifted by a loved one, with intent as a cherished item of presentation and ceremony to help the individual look his best.
 

Armando

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Maybe somebody can do a quick how to video? trying to figure out knots from pictures is tuff
 

Cvkotvkse

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What time period and where? The "tied behind" description was right for the NE, usually d.plohinv the "voyageur" loom-woven sashes.
If you are In the Southeast area, with any Native influence on your personna, there were rules to be followed:
1. The (usually) finger-woven sash is wrapped around twice, and tied ON THE LEFT-HAND SIDE; a sash tied on the right hand side denoted a
Maker of Medicine or other ceremonial leader.
2. The sash is tied w/ a single-loop bow, with the loop pointing up.
These guidelines have been present among Southeastern people since. before contact with Europeans as this way of thing the sash is clearly illustrated on shell carvings dating to over 900 years ago.
 

Brokennock

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What time period and where? The "tied behind" description was right for the NE, usually d.plohinv the "voyageur" loom-woven sashes.
If you are In the Southeast area, with any Native influence on your personna, there were rules to be followed:
1. The (usually) finger-woven sash is wrapped around twice, and tied ON THE LEFT-HAND SIDE; a sash tied on the right hand side denoted a
Maker of Medicine or other ceremonial leader.

2. The sash is tied w/ a single-loop bow, with the loop pointing up.
These guidelines have been present among Southeastern people since. before contact with Europeans as this way of thing the sash is clearly illustrated on shell carvings dating to over 900 years ago.
So, this is for native peoples?
We have written accounts of whites in the southeast, Dodderage writing aboutnKentucky is the 1st that comes to mind, of whites with their, "belt /sash, tied behind..." There are other accounts from the same region of white settlers/hunters/scouts tying their belts/sashes behind their back.

Do you have a picture of any of the shell carvings? I'm sure I'm not the only one who would enjoy seeing them.


That said, I often use the "single loop bow," but wasn't sure how to describe it.
 

NorthFork

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Yes, I would like to see pics of the shell carvings too!
 
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