Project blades, ???

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Brokennock

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I picked these up for $10 each at a local gun show. No stampings or any type of marking. Any ideas on what, and how, to do with them do give them a more 1770 to 1780 look?
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I have no drill press and limited work space. Looking for something quick and easy, even if it looks like a period repair.
Thoughts on mixing some "Massey Finish" applying it to the scales, letting it get between the scales and steel, hopefully to help seal off moisture, then lacing a piece of rawhide or leather around the handle to hide the non period pins?
 

Black Hand

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I picked these up for $10 each at a local gun show. No stampings or any type of marking. Any ideas on what, and how, to do with them do give them a more 1770 to 1780 look?
View attachment 4649
View attachment 4650
View attachment 4651
I have no drill press and limited work space. Looking for something quick and easy, even if it looks like a period repair.
Thoughts on mixing some "Massey Finish" applying it to the scales, letting it get between the scales and steel, hopefully to help seal off moisture, then lacing a piece of rawhide or leather around the handle to hide the non period pins?
Iron pins predate the rivets and are period. Number and distribution of pins can help date era and region of origin.
My recommendation is make them proper sheaths and use them as they are...
 

Black Hand

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It appears as if the lower one has been abused by a grinder. Needs a little cleaning-up...
 

Brokennock

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Thanks. I thought the 5 pins were too many, and the full tang to be wrong too, for anything remotely 18th century.
Will see if they will take an edge and then go from there. They both need some elbow grease and time spent on them.
 

Black Hand

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Thanks. I thought the 5 pins were too many, and the full tang to be wrong too, for anything remotely 18th century.
Will see if they will take an edge and then go from there. They both need some elbow grease and time spent on them.
99% won't know the difference. A little more research into trade blades might do the trick. The number of pins and the full vs partial tang varied.
 

LRB

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Full tangs were not rare, just not as common as half tangs or stick tangs. The multi pins are usually a 19th c. indicator.
 

Stophel

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The bottom one is a bit far gone, but the top one could be made into a more proper scalper look. Grind off the hump, and straighten the edge up.
 

Artificer

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Growing up in the 1960's I saw many professional butchers' knives that were sharpened so many times they were less than half the distance spine top to edge of the second knife and still being used. Some had been sharpened so much they looked like they were fillet knives for fish.

I have no doubt period "trade/butcher" knives looked like that after much use as well.

Gus
 

Brokennock

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Thanks for the input everyone. I do like the overall shape of the second one better, but it is the rougher of the two.
I tend to prefer blades with a bit of curve to the cutting edge, more so than straight or constant taper from bolster to point.
Something just odd about the hump of the spine and abrupt curve toward the point of the cutting edge on the second one. I'm thinking about leaving the spine hump, at first, and grinding a gradual curve from about 2.5 inches from the tip to the tip of the cutting edge, on knife number 1.
 

Stophel

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Look at known 18th century butcher/scalper knives for your inspiration. ;)
 
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