Primer Charge when Hunting

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Do you worry about the orientation of the priming charge in the pan while hunting? The reason for the question is that when one is out in the woods the gun gets carried or moved in many different directions. This causes the priming charge to move all around or "slosh" in the pan. It might be banked against the vent - or over on the other side of the pan. Is it a good idea to gently shake the gun to level out the prime before a shot or just go with it?
I know when I'm plinking or shooting targets this isn't an issue, so I'm mainly concerned with this during hunting situations. If one is in a blind or a tree stand it isn't an issue either. I just haven't had a flintlock long enough to know (or find out) the answer to this question. My lock is a Chambers round faced lock so there is a good bit of room in the pan for the priming charge to move around.
 

hanshi

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Unlike the way I prime at the range, in the bush I just put in prime and never worry about it or smack the rifle. A good rifle will do what you want 98% of the time. If smacking the breech, carrying it in a certain aspect or going to extremes is required for the gun to be reliable, then the gun is not trustworthy.
 
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Unlike the way I prime at the range, in the bush I just put in prime and never worry about it or smack the rifle. A good rifle will do what you want 98% of the time. If smacking the breech, carrying it in a certain aspect or going to extremes is required for the gun to be reliable, then the gun is not trustworthy.
Thanks. I was thinking this the most likely answer. Then again there is always discussion about banking powder toward or away from the flash hole and that got me thinking - or overthinking as the case may be.
 

deermanok

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I haven't hunted with my flintlock yet.
I always walk in before shooting light anyway. I figured to prime my pan once I got to my spot and settled in.
 

Bushfire

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I just check it every now and then for moisture and if it's bunched up against the flash hole I'll tap it across but as you say walking through the bush lifting, dodging and what not it going to move around. Hanshi hit the nail on the head if it can't handle that it's not that reliable a shooter anyhow.

If you prick the touch hole at the start of the hunt I find that helps too.
 

Tom A Hawk

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Unlike the way I prime at the range, in the bush I just put in prime and never worry about it or smack the rifle. A good rifle will do what you want 98% of the time. If smacking the breech, carrying it in a certain aspect or going to extremes is required for the gun to be reliable, then the gun is not trustworthy.
Just like Hanshi said. "Old guys know stuff"...
 

Banjoman

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I just prime it the way that I know it will fire and leave it alone. When small game hunting, I’m not running or jumping or doing gymnastics through the woods. I just ease along very slowly looking for the critters before they see me.

”White man walks much, sees little. Indian walks little, sees much.”
 
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No, I don't have to because my touch holes are in the right position, as long as they are high over the pan then they are covered by the heel of the frizzen when closed and can't get plugged with priming powder...

This is the correct answer right here.

As a rule I try to roll the gun slightly to the right before shooting just as a precaution, but the frizzen should cover the touchhole to keep it open so it can “see” the pan charge ignite.
 

freedom475

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Fill your pan full of powder as intended, then there will be no movement of prime.
With a Pedersoli you may have to fill the pan twice, because the patent breach will swallow the first pan as you move through the woods.

All flintlock ignition time trials have show that fastest lock times are achieved when the powder is banked towards the vent hole.
The "flash" theory has been proven false many times! But the Internet won't let it pass into lore.
 
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Fill your pan full of powder as intended, then there will be no movement of prime.
With a Pedersoli you may have to fill the pan twice, because the patent breach will swallow the first pan as you move through the woods.

All flintlock ignition time trials have show that fastest lock times are achieved when the powder is banked towards the vent hole.
The "flash" theory has been proven false many times! But the Internet won't let it pass into lore.

Links to these trials and proofs please.
 

Pukka Bundook

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I believe when Larry Pletcher was timing locks, he found that powder over the touchhole was just as fast as banked away from the touchhole, maybe faster. so don't worry about it, and the Chambers round faced is one of the best and fastest locks available!!
its the one I used all the time.
 
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Well…sort of. Five tests is not what true science is about. Overall I agree with their conclusions at the end on general lock time issues.

But, there is no argument that heat wave propagation travels faster than a burning fuse of powder (or flying sparks). Their own experiment shows that. Is it fast enough for most to be able to discern? That’s another issue.

I read some of their other articles and find some of their conclusions and assumptions questionable. Interesting experiments though, thanks for posting that link.
 
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