Prettiest Cap and Ball

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vintovka

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ROAs are very nice and built to last. The stainless with ivory grips was my favorite, I have had many pass thru my hands but the both the 60 (and especially the 62) are now top of list. Old age also plays a part. Reduction in hand strength (and increase in pain) changes both perception and ergonomics.
 

Crow-Feather

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All-time favorite is the Colt 1851 Navy. Preferably with the square back trigger guard.

For modern, the Ruger Old Army stainless with adjustable rear sight.

Ginger is the one you take to Vegas. Mary Ann you settle down with....
Mary Ann was a pot smoking anti-police devil in real life. Broke my heart.

But my lovely is a 1851 Navy in 44 caliber. Doesn't shoot hard but gets the job done
 

Sam squanch

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Remember “free Gilligan”? When “Mary Ann mailed him a box of weed, and he got busted?
 

vervillev

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Is the "Cattleman" the cap & ball revolver that looks like a Colt Model P? If that is "the look" that you prefer, by all means get one and shoot it! These are not very traditional, but the same could be said for a lot of the mass-produced long arms that we discuss here.

It is my understanding that the cylinder must be removed from that type of revolver for loading, as there is no loading lever, and you'll probably want a loading press of some sort. There are one or two active threads on this forum discussing loading presses.

However, if you want opinions on the best looking percussion revolver, mine is that the Colt London Navy would be hard to beat. The 1860 Army Colt would also be a strong contender, but I really like the look of the Navy's octagonal barrel.

This reminds me of the old "Gilligan's Island" question... Maryanne, or Ginger?

Best regards,

Notchy Bob
Uh, both...
 

Zonie

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Both you and @Zonie are partial to the police. Can you put your finger on exactly what it is you find appealing about this pistols.
I think the smooth, flowing lines of the barrel and loading lever, coupled with the half fluted cylinder all come together to raise the pistol to the top of my list.

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Woodnbow

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Like Hemingway’s quote about heaven and since it’s all hypothetical, all three and none would know that I was with the other two.

The cattleman is based on the 1873 single action army. I notice when looking at it that it has the dip down to the barrel that I’m complaining about on the cap and ball pistols. It must be the extra length and extra hardware required for loading that is unpleasant to my eye.
the 1860 New Model Army is the most beautiful of the c&b revolvers in any barrel length. With the 1861 Navy running a close second. IMO...

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Woodnbow

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I just watched the Manny CA video with him firing the Ruger Old Army. Seems like about 1 of 3 or 4 shots misfires. Is that normal for blackpowder percussion revolvers. He took it in stride, but I would find that extremely frustrating.
No, not normal if it’s properly loaded with black powder and caps and balls that fit the chambers and cones...

and... the original 1860 outshines any of the replicas...

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rshveyda

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1851 Navy Engraved.jpg

I'm partial to the 1851 Colt Navy, but only because I got a great deal on this engraved Pietta clone with checkered grips when budsgunshop.com cleared them out for $222 shipped about two years ago. It's chambered in historically inaccurate .44 caliber, but I try not to hold that against it.

I'd love to find an 1860 with similar engraving, something like this Pietta 1860 Army Dlx Engraved "Old Silver," and add checkered grips to it to fill my other hand. Maybe once inventory levels get back to "normal" and prices come back down to "semi-reasonable."

1860_ARMY_DELUXE_CAM44_44.jpg
 

SOLANCO

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ROAs are very nice and built to last. The stainless with ivory grips was my favorite, I have had many pass thru my hands but the both the 60 (and especially the 62) are now top of list. Old age also plays a part. Reduction in hand strength (and increase in pain) changes both perception and ergonomics.
You can help your strength, if you can stand the pain of doing it. The pain you will have to live with. Growing old ain't for sissies.
 

terrycrogers

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Even though I love and prefer the awesome Brass Framed 1851 Navy Griswold & Gunnison, I have to take my hat off and respect the slim and sleek lines of the McCollough Colt 1860 Army.
The "Griz and Gunny" was my first black powder firearm, a High Standard I spotted in the display case at a local feed store in '75. The brass frame caught my eye and over the years of shooting nothing but max loads (the ignorance of youth) I managed to shoot it loose, so it sits forlorn in the safe and was recently replaced by a steel framed Pietta 1851. Just curious, but is there a way to restore the High Standard? Anybody out there familiar with the process? Or is it a wall hanger now...
 

Whitworth

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The "Griz and Gunny" was my first black powder firearm, a High Standard I spotted in the display case at a local feed store in '75. The brass frame caught my eye and over the years of shooting nothing but max loads (the ignorance of youth) I managed to shoot it loose, so it sits forlorn in the safe and was recently replaced by a steel framed Pietta 1851. Just curious, but is there a way to restore the High Standard? Anybody out there familiar with the process? Or is it a wall hanger now...
I have a High Standard Griz and Gunny that should be named "Loosey". It was that way when I bought it just for a display piece with relics. I too have wondered if it could be fixed. The arbor appears to be pinned in the frame, does anybody know if it is?
 

Ponderosaman

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One small thing I like about these guns is how close this trigger is to the back of the trigger guard.
 
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