Point a tenderfoot in the right direction on selecting a kit

Muzzleloading Forum

Help Support Muzzleloading Forum:

Joined
Jul 13, 2018
Messages
396
Reaction score
586
Location
Plano, Texas
Am going to order a winter/foul weather project next week. Last time I did such was with a CVA kit which tells you how many years it has been. Which Traditions kit should I start off with? I put them in an order that I perceive would be best. All are a .50" percussion.

1) Frontier
2) Kentucky Rifle
3) St. Louis Hawken

Where would it be best for a newbie to start off?

Reason I listed the Frontier first as it appears to be simpler and less to screw up. Thinking that then could advance to the Kentucky Rifle and finish with the Hawken.
 

JohnnieT

Percussion Enthusiast
Joined
Sep 20, 2020
Messages
307
Reaction score
369
Location
Dyersburg, TN
The Traditions Deer Hunter is a pretty simple kit that finishes well. It’s available in flint and percussion, but if I remember right the only available caliber is .50.
 
Joined
Aug 17, 2022
Messages
816
Reaction score
1,418
Location
Virginia
I have built two Traditions kits so far with a third coming this winter. The first kit was a Shenendoha rifle kit that I put a lot of work into for a school project. I added a lot of brass inlays and a patch box. The second was a percussion Blunderbuss which pretty much fell together. I have a third kit that is still in parts awaiting winter time so I'll have something to keep my mind and hands a little busy. My point is you can make them as easy or as difficult as you want by changing a few things to make the rifle your own like inlays. If you are handy with tools I would suggest buying the kit you want and dig around Track of The Wolf and similar sites to find ways you can add embellishments to it. Inlays are an easy way to personalize a muzzleloader without breaking the bank if that's something you would be interested in doing. Practice a scrap piece of 2x4 lumber first though. Here is a picture of my first Traditions kit that did not come with any extras. There is also a forum here called The Gun Builders Bench where one can seek advice on tools and how-to's if you have questions on how to proceed.
 

Attachments

  • Week Four 8-2.jpg
    Week Four 8-2.jpg
    123 KB · Views: 0
Joined
Jul 13, 2018
Messages
396
Reaction score
586
Location
Plano, Texas
Dixie Gun Works has Pedersoli Kits . . . not knocking traditions, but many believe Pedersoli is a better rifle.
I am to woodworking as Joe Biden is to politics, “Never under estimate my ability to screw things up.” I won’t be so upset with myself with a mistake with a Traditions as I would be with a Pedersoli.
:doh:

I want get my skills up prior to tackling a higher grade of kit.
 
Joined
Aug 17, 2022
Messages
816
Reaction score
1,418
Location
Virginia
I am to woodworking as Joe Biden is to politics, “Never under estimate my ability to screw things up.” I won’t be so upset with myself with a mistake with a Traditions as I would be with a Pedersoli.
:doh:

I want get my skills up prior to tackling a higher grade of kit.m
Even a better reason to practice with gouges and chisels. When I first started inlaying I cut my fingers in about 30 places. There was blood all over the bare stock. The best part of building a kit is researching and learning how to do it and what tools you need to accomplish the task. I used three chisels, a lot of sandpaper, blocks of wood, and just about everything else in my garage. Heck, I even made several cabinet scrapers out of an old metal paint scraper to remove stock wood when I was thinning it down. The most important tool I was forced to use was patience and by the way, peroxide is great at removing blood stains from wood.
 
Joined
Aug 21, 2022
Messages
334
Reaction score
474
Location
Tampa FL
I built Traditions Kentucky pistol as my first build. Loved the kit and love the finished product! I found my Traditions kit to be well made, and easy to finish. You will enjoy your choice.
 
Joined
Aug 17, 2022
Messages
816
Reaction score
1,418
Location
Virginia
Got most of the tools today that were listed in the NMLRA's 'build a Traditions *****' videos'.
The Frontier kit is due in Thursday.
Gonna find out....
My best advice is to take your time and research each step, especially the desired finish you are wanting. It will be easy to try and hurry the process just to get it completed and shootable. Make sure you post pictures of the finished gun. If you have questions about it, ask because there is a lot of builder experience within the group that are willing to help anyone. Have fun with the build.
 
Joined
Aug 17, 2022
Messages
816
Reaction score
1,418
Location
Virginia
As I understand, Traditions stocks are beach although Traditions list them only as hardwood. I've done a couple of their kits and they do tend to show a few bleached areas. Another member suggested using shellac on the wood first, then staining so I will experiment with that on my next Traditions kit. I have a factory Traditions Crocket rifle (not a kit) that looks perfect regarding the wood, so I'm not sure what wood they used for those but it favors walnut.
 
Joined
Feb 23, 2009
Messages
14,591
Reaction score
2,437
Location
Central Minn
Of your 3?
1. Frontier
2. St Louis Hawken.
Stay away from the split-stock.
Why?
They both are double trigger models vs the single trigger Kentucky, the double trigger models have the full bridle lock with a fly, it's a better grade Spanish made lock.
The primary difference between the two is the minor shape of the butt plate, and with/without a patch box.

Did I mention, stay away from the single trigger split-stock?
 
Joined
Jul 13, 2018
Messages
396
Reaction score
586
Location
Plano, Texas
Of your 3?
1. Frontier
2. St Louis Hawken.
Stay away from the split-stock.
Why?
They both are double trigger models vs the single trigger Kentucky, the double trigger models have the full bridle lock with a fly, it's a better grade Spanish made lock.
The primary difference between the two is the minor shape of the butt plate, and with/without a patch box.

Did I mention, stay away from the single trigger split-stock?
There are double trigger split-stock kits and am all about less problems with a better equipment for just a tad more.
( Traditions Deluxe Kentucky Muzzleloader Rifle Kit, Double Trigger, .50 Cal )

Thanks for the heads-up on why the difference.
Why I keep coming back to this site.
 
Joined
Feb 23, 2009
Messages
14,591
Reaction score
2,437
Location
Central Minn
Wow, interesting, I've never seen or heard of a Traditions Deluxe Kentucky.
What a great idea,, a slow twist long barrel with their double trigger/lock set up!
Those old Jukar and CVA .45 slow twist barrels where/are tack drivers.
 

edw.marshall

32 Cal.
Joined
Sep 2, 2005
Messages
96
Reaction score
90
Location
illinois
Am going to order a winter/foul weather project next week. Last time I did such was with a CVA kit which tells you how many years it has been. Which Traditions kit should I start off with? I put them in an order that I perceive would be best. All are a .50" percussion.

1) Frontier
2) Kentucky Rifle
3) St. Louis Hawken

Where would it be best for a newbie to start off?

Reason I listed the Frontier first as it appears to be simpler and less to screw up. Thinking that then could advance to the Kentucky Rifle and finish with the Hawken.
I prefer the St. Louis Hawken kit. It can be made to look like an Oregon or Santa Fe trail travelers rifle or trade rifle.
 

Bebop Cowboy

32 Cal
Joined
Oct 25, 2022
Messages
24
Reaction score
9
Location
32707
All good advice here Wganz!!! From my experience I have tried Inline, percussion, and now have a traditions flintlock which i love. But guns are like cars. you wont know what you like until you try it. Dont waste your money on guns you dont want. go to an open gun range where they shoot Muzzleloaders and ask to try a few different types. They would love to assist you. There you will get an education and choice that YOU will like.
Smell the Powder. It is the Perfume de la Freedom***
 

Latest posts

Top